UN / EBOLA UPDATE

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01-Aug-2019 00:03:29
On the one-year anniversary of the declaration of an Ebola outbreak in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), which has so far caused 1756 deaths, Ebola Emergency Response Coordinator David Gressly, said that he “never thought we would still be talking about the same outbreak.” UNIFEED

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STORY: UN / EBOLA UPDATE
TRT: 03:29
SOURCE: UNIFEED
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LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 01 AUGUST 2019, NEW YORK CITY / FILE

SHOTLIST:

RECENT - NEW YORK CITY

1. Wide shot, exterior, UN Headquarters

01 AUGUST 2019, NEW YORK CITY

2. Wide shot, press conference with principals on screen
3. Wide shot, reporters
4. SOUNDBITE (English) David Gressly, Ebola Emergency Response Coordinator:
“This is the one-year anniversary of the declaration of the outbreak in Mangina which is just a few kilometres here from Beni City. In fact, in 2018, on the 2nd of August, the next day, I travelled with the Minister of Health to bring not only himself, but also a team of responders, supplies, equipment laboratory, to Mangina to try to get this epidemic under control as quickly as possible. I have to say that I never thought we would still be talking about the same outbreak.”
5. Wide shot, press conference with principals on screen
6. SOUNDBITE (English) David Gressly, Ebola Emergency Response Coordinator:
“The environment is difficult because of the high density of population. It’s difficult because it’s a conflict zone and has been for the last 20, 25 years. It’s an area of opposition politically that has felt marginalized, with a high distrust of the local authorities, all of which make it very complicated to work here. It was also heavily affected by the decision of the National Electoral Commission not to hold presidential elections at the end of 2018, and that created a lot of suspicion about Ebola, whether it was real or not, or why it was used as a pretext not to hold the election.”
7. Wide shot, press conference with principals on screen
8. SOUNDBITE (English) David Gressly, Ebola Emergency Response Coordinator:
“There’s still too many gaps in the response, either geographically, there are zones that are at risk where the virus can come in to and we don’t detect it as quickly as we should. But we need to be able to anticipate where the virus is going, not chasing it around once it starts to replicate in a new area.”
9. Wide shot, press conference with principals on screen
10. SOUNDBITE (English) David Gressly, Ebola Emergency Response Coordinator:
“We had a recent case in Goma which looks like there’s more than one individual that’s infected. It’s a stark reminder that as long as it circulates in this area, it can move into a new area like Goma. There’s a case that crossed into Uganda. We have another case that was close to the border with South Sudan. And the longer it continues to circulate in this area, the more likely we’ll see a chain of transmission established in another part of this country, or a neighbouring country.”
11. Wide shot, press conference with principals on screen
12. SOUNDBITE (English) Margaret Harris, Spokesperson, World Health Organization (WHO):
“We’ve got a 95 percent acceptance of the vaccine, which is extraordinary, when you consider what we see in the rest of the world with vaccines that have been around for a very long time. But Ebola is a little bit special because just one person not being vaccinated and then being infected can seed the virus everywhere else. So, we really need 100 percent acceptance. So, it’s not acceptance of the vaccine, what we do struggle with is acceptance of being identified as a high-risk contact. So, yes, we find all the contacts we think we know of, but there are people who hide their illness, who flee, who go to another place, who think that being taken to an Ebola treatment centre is like being taken to the death house.”
13. Zoom out, end of presser

STORYLINE:

On the one-year anniversary of the declaration of an Ebola outbreak in Mangina, in the north of the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), Ebola Emergency Response Coordinator David Gressly, said he “never thought we would still be talking about the same outbreak.”

Briefing reporters via teleconference from the city of Beni, Gressly explained the difficulties in containing and eradicating the disease. He said, “the environment is difficult because of the high density of population. It’s difficult because it’s a conflict zone and has been for the last 20, 25 years. It’s an area of opposition politically that has felt marginalized, with a high distrust of the local authorities, all of which make it very complicated to work here.”

Particularly, he said the decision of the National Electoral Commission not to hold presidential elections at the end of 2018, “created a lot of suspicion about Ebola, whether it was real or not, or why it was used as a pretext not to hold the election.”

The Ebola Emergency Response Coordinator said, “there’s still too many gaps in the response, either geographically, there are zones that are at risk where the virus can come in to and we don’t detect it as quickly as we should. But we need to be able to anticipate where the virus is going, not chasing it around once it starts to replicate in a new area.”

He noted that following a recent case in Goma, it “looks like there’s more than one individual that’s infected” which is “a stark reminder that as long as it circulates in this area, it can move into a new area.”

Gressly said, “there’s a case that crossed into Uganda. We have another case that was close to the border with South Sudan. And the longer it continues to circulate in this area, the more likely we’ll see a chain of transmission established in another part of this country, or a neighbouring country.”

Also briefing from Beni, the spokesperson for the World Health Organization (WHO) Ebola team in the DRC, Margaret Harris, said, “we’ve got a 95 percent acceptance of the vaccine, which is extraordinary, when you consider what we see in the rest of the world with vaccines that have been around for a very long time. But Ebola is a little bit special because just one person not being vaccinated and then being infected can seed the virus everywhere else. So, we really need 100 percent acceptance.”

Harris said, “what we do struggle with is acceptance of being identified as a high-risk contact. So, yes, we find all the contacts we think we know of, but there are people who hide their illness, who flee, who go to another place, who think that being taken to an Ebola treatment centre is like being taken to the death house.”

According to the WHO, as of 25 July there were 2518 confirmed cases of Ebola Virus Disease in the DRC, with 1756 total deaths.
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