SOMALIA / HUMAN RIGHTS

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25-Jul-2019 00:03:22
The UN independent expert on the situation of human rights in Somalia said despite “considerable progress” in its political, economic, social and humanitarian situation, there was much more to do in the country. UNSOM

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STORY: SOMALIA / HUMAN RIGHTS
TRT: 3:22
SOURCE: UNSOM
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 25 JULY 2019, MOGADISHU, SOMALIA

SHOTLIST:

FILE - NEW YORK CITY

1. Wide shot, Nyanduga at press conference
2. Close up, Nyanduga speaking
3. Wide shot, Nyanduga at press conference
4. SOUNDBITE (English) Bahame Tom Nyanduga, United Nations Independent Expert on the situation of human rights in Somalia:
“There continues to be experiences of inequality and discrimination and challenges to the realization of basic rights such as access to water, access land, access health facilities and education particularly for girls and internally displaced persons, minority clans, and other marginalized communities.”
5. Med shot, videographer
6. Med shot, Nyanduga speaking
7. Close up, Nyanduga speaking
8. SOUNDBITE (English) Bahame Tom Nyanduga, United Nations Independent Expert on the situation of human rights in Somalia:
“I expressed my concern on the delay in the operationalization of the National Human Rights Commission, of which we know the selection process was completed sometime in 2017. The delay in its operationalization affects the appointment of the Judicial Services Commission, which is necessary to ensure the establishment of an independent judiciary. Similarly, there is a lack of progress in the adoption of the Sexual Offences Bill at the federal level. I urge both the Federal Government and Federal Parliament, to address these matters as a matter of priority that is the operationalization of the Human Rights Commission and the adoption of the Sexual Offences Bill because both of them are important for sustaining the protection of human rights in the country.”
9. Close up, a document
10. Close up, Nyanduga reading through a document
11. Med shot, Nyanduga reading through a document
12. SOUNDBITE (English) Bahame Tom Nyanduga, United Nations Independent Expert on the situation of human rights in Somalia:
“Since when I started coming to this country in December 2014, I have witnessed considerable progress in the security, political, economic, social and humanitarian situation. I have witnessed the recovery of territory, towns and cities, and the diminishing of Al-Shabaab’s capability. This is due mainly to the action of the Somali security institutions, with the assistance of AMISOM troops and bilateral forces. I wish to commend the Somalia National Army and AMISOM for their achievement and sacrifices.”
13. Med shot, journalists
14. Close up, document
15. SOUNDBITE (English) Bahame Tom Nyanduga, United Nations Independent Expert on the situation of human rights in Somalia:
“Among the challenges which remained during the last six years, and this one is very important for the members of the media is the continuous reports that I received about the intimidation, arbitrary arrests, and detention and the harassment of journalists across the country. This has been happening in Somaliland, in Puntland and in all other Federal Member States. I am concerned particularly with the harassment in Jubaland which is due to hold elections in a short while.”
16. Wide shot, Nyanduga briefing media

STORYLINE:

The UN independent expert on the situation of human rights in Somalia said despite “considerable progress” in its political, economic, social and humanitarian situation, there was much more to do in the country.

Speaking to reporters in the Somali capital Mogadishu today (25 Jul), Bahame Tom Nyanduga said the country continued to witness “inequality”, “discrimination” and other challenges to the realization of “basic rights such as access to water, access land, access health facilities and education particularly for girls and internally displaced persons, minority clans, and other marginalized communities.”

He urged the international community and Federal Government of Somalia to address the negative effects of climate change on the population and called on the international community to continue helping Somalia strengthen its federal and state institutions and enhance access to basic human rights.

The Independent Expert was speaking on the last day of a 12-day visit, which saw him meet with top officials of the federal government, legislators, members of civil society, trade unionists and officials of the UN and the African Union Mission in Somalia (AMISOM), among others. He also visited Hargeisa and held talks with the leadership of Somaliland.

Nyanduga expressed concern at the delay in the operationalization of the country’s National Human Rights Commission and lack of progress on the enactment of the Sexual Offences Bill. He urged the federal authorities and the federal parliament to prioritize the matter to enhance the protection of human rights in the country.

SOUNDBITE (English) Bahame Tom Nyanduga, United Nations Independent Expert on the situation of human rights in Somalia:
“I expressed my concern on the delay in the operationalization of the National Human Rights Commission, of which we know the selection process was completed sometime in 2017. The delay in its operationalization affects the appointment of the Judicial Services Commission, which is necessary to ensure the establishment of an independent judiciary. Similarly, there is a lack of progress in the adoption of the Sexual Offences Bill at the federal level. I urge both the Federal Government and Federal Parliament, to address these matters as a matter of priority that is the operationalization of the Human Rights Commission and the adoption of the Sexual Offences Bill because both of them are important for sustaining the protection of human rights in the country.”

Nyanduga emphasized that Somalia's continuing conflict and other socio-cultural and economic challenges were hindering the enjoyment of basic rights and must be addressed by the federal authorities and their international partners.

SOUNDBITE (English) Bahame Tom Nyanduga, United Nations Independent Expert on the situation of human rights in Somalia:
“Among the challenges which remained during the last six years, and this one is very important for the members of the media is the continuous reports that I received about the intimidation, arbitrary arrests, and detention and the harassment of journalists across the country. This has been happening in Somaliland, in Puntland and in all other Federal Member States. I am concerned particularly with the harassment in Jubaland which is due to hold elections in a short while.”

Despite the challenges faced, Nyanduga noted that the Federal Government of Somalia and the country’s Federal Member States were enhancing access to basic human rights, including health, water and education for the residents and praised the increasing enrolment of girls in schools as a good development for the realization of women's rights in Somalia.

Nyanduga also noted the recovery of “territory, towns and cities, and the diminishing of Al-Shabaab’s capability; this is due mainly to the action of the Somali security institutions, with the assistance of AMISOM troops and bilateral forces.” He commended the Somalia National Army and AMISOM for their achievement and sacrifices.

The UN Independent Expert’s findings will be presented in a comprehensive report to the Geneva-based UN Human Rights Council in September this year.

Independent Experts like Nyanduga are part of the Council's so-called Special Procedures, which have such experts work on a voluntary basis. They are not UN staff and do not receive a salary for their work. They are independent from any government or organization and serve in their individual capacity.
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