UN / ARCTIC WILDFIRES

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12-Jul-2019 00:01:27
Referencing the World Meteorological Organization (WMO), a UN spokesperson said today that there have been “unprecedented” wildfires in the Arctic since the beginning of June. UNIFEED

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STORY: UN / ARCTIC WILDFIRES
TRT: 1:27
SOURCE: UNIFEED
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 12 JULY 2019, NEW YORK CITY

SHOTLIST:

FILE - NEW YORK CITY

1. Wide shot, UNHQ exterior

JULY 2019, NEW YORK CITY

2. Wide shot, press room
3. SOUNDBITE (English) Farhan Haq, Deputy Spokesperson for the Secretary-General, United Nations:
“There have been unprecedented wildfires in the Arctic since the beginning of June, according to the World Meteorological Organization (WMO). Over 100 intense and long-lived wildfires were recorded in the Arctic Circle. In Alaska and Siberia, some were large enough to cover almost 100,000 football pitches. Unusually hot and dry conditions have contributed to the spread of wildfires. Alaska has had its 2nd hottest June and hit a record high of 32°C, or 90°F, a week ago.”
4. Med shot, journalists
5. SOUNDBITE (English) Farhan Haq, Deputy Spokesperson for the Secretary-General, United Nations:
“WMO says the northern part of the world is warming faster than the planet as a whole. That heat is drying out forests and making them more susceptible to burn. Wildfires also release carbon dioxide into the atmosphere, contributing further to global warming. In June alone, the Arctic fires emitted 50 megatonnes of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. To give you an idea, this is equivalent to Sweden’s annual CO2 emissions. In view of the risks, WMO has initiated a Vegetation Fire and Smoke Pollution Warning and Advisory System to harmonize fire forecasting across the globe and to provide a better picture of related impacts and hazards.”
6. Wide shot, press room

STORYLINE:

Referencing the World Meteorological Organization (WMO), a UN spokesperson said today that there have been “unprecedented” wildfires in the Arctic since the beginning of June.

Speaking to reporters in New York, UN spokesperson Farhan Haq said over 100 “intense and long-lived wildfires were recorded in the Arctic Circle. In Alaska and Siberia, some were large enough to cover almost 100,000 football pitches.”

Haq noted that “unusually hot and dry conditions have contributed to the spread of wildfires” with Alaska having its 2nd hottest June and hitting a record high of 32°C, or 90°F, a week ago.

“WMO says the northern part of the world is warming faster than the planet as a whole. That heat is drying out forests and making them more susceptible to burn,” Haq added.

The UN spokesperson said wildfires also release carbon dioxide into the atmosphere, contributing further to global warming. He said, “In June alone, the Arctic fires emitted 50 megatonnes of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. To give you an idea, this is equivalent to Sweden’s annual CO2 emissions.”

In view of the risks, WMO has initiated a Vegetation Fire and Smoke Pollution Warning and Advisory System to harmonize fire forecasting across the globe and to provide a better picture of related impacts and hazards.
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