SOUTH SUDAN / AFRICAN CHILD DAY

Preview Language:   Original
14-Jun-2019 00:03:40
On the Day of the African Child, sixteen South Sudanese students from various secondary schools took over the airwaves at the United Nations Radio Miraya, echoing their concerns and asking tough questions to various officials, as they demanded the right to education for both boys and girls. UNMISS

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STORY: SOUTH SUDAN / AFRICAN CHILD DAY
TRT: 03:40
SOURCE: UNMISS
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGES: ENGLISH /NATS

DATELINE: 14 JUNE 2019, JUBA, SOUTH SUDAN

SHOTLIST:

1. Wide shot, Radio Miraya Satellite and antennae
2. Close shot, Radio Miraya Logo
3. Med shot, Elizabeth Aguil reading news
4. UPSOUND (English) Elizabeth Aguil, at Juba Diocese Secondary School:
“This is Radio Miraya news, I am Elizabeth Aguil. The headlines, Ministry of Health appeal for 12 million US Dollars for the fight against Ebola. UN Security Council to discuss solution in Sudan. And authorities in Aweil is saying plan to establish centers for children living on the streets.”
5. Close up, news script
6. SOUNDBITE (English) Elizabeth Aguil, Student at Juba Diocese Secondary School:
“It was very interesting reading the news and it was even a life experience. Like when I use to be outside there, I used to think those reading news are maybe I thought those guys are magic. They are awesome. You know if you are coming to something for the first time you feel a little nervous like what should I do, but it was really very interesting I enjoyed reading news I even feel like not coming out I should continue reading.”
7. Various shots, students presenting program in the studio
8. SOUNDBITE (English) Alfred Orono-Orono, Chief of Child Protection UNMISS:
“The children are the future we should all work together to prepare this future. If we expect a bright future lets invest in the future right now and the future is children let’s ensure that all violations against children are eradicated. It is very simple. It requires education, it requires commitment and it requires resources.”
9. Various shots, Students interviewing South Sudan UNICEF staff
10. SOUNDBITE (English) Helene Ryeng, Communication Officer, UNICEF:
“Children should speak up about the issues that are affecting their lives. I understand it can be challenging because I know that in some areas in some places they are not used to being listened to. But is important that they are exercising their right to speak up and getting used to having their voice heard. So, I do encourage all children to speak up about issues that affecting them, addressing them with adults and other influential people in their lives.”
11. Various shots, Students interviewing representative of government
12. SOUNDBITE (English) Mary Kojo, Director General for child and social welfare South Sudan:
“We want to see that these children grow up as good future leaders, and we want them to be mentored by good leaders. And we want to be given that space where we can mentor them in a safe environment.”
13. Various shots, Students interviewing SRSG
14. SOUNDBITE (English) David Shearer, Special Representative of the Secretary General for South Sudan:
“I think children should dream, they should have hopes and they should have dreams. And I think is for us to try to fulfil those dreams not decide for them no you can’t do that it is about us saying yes, I hear you how can we help you fulfil your dream that’s is what adults t should be doing. So, my message to all the grown-ups out there is listen to your kids listen to their dreams and help them to get to where they want to go.”
15. Various shots, Radio Miraya studio

STORYLINE:

On the Day of the African Child, sixteen South Sudanese students from various secondary schools took over the airwaves at the United Nations Radio Miraya, echoing their concerns and asking tough questions to various officials, as they demanded the right to education for both boys and girls.

Hiding her nervousness, as she read the first news bulletin of the day, Elizabeth Aguil soldiered on with confidence and clarity.

SOUNDBITE (English) Elizabeth Aguil, Student at Juba Diocese Secondary School:
“It was very interesting reading the news and it was even a life experience. Like when I use to be outside there, I used to think those reading news are maybe I thought those guys are magic. They are awesome. You know if you are coming to something for the first time you feel a little nervous like what should I do, but it was really very interesting I enjoyed reading news I even feel like not coming out I should continue reading.”

Every year on June 16, since 1991, children across Africa commemorate the Day of the African Child, remembering hundreds who were shot in South Africa’s Soweto during protests against the low-quality education that they were receiving.

The broadcasts, punctuated by some entertainment, also brought out serious discussions relating to violations that many have been experienced in troubled South Sudan.

On the receiving end, the UNMISS head of Child Protection explained the role of his work to the inquisitive day-long ‘news personalities’.

SOUNDBITE (English) Alfred Orono-Orono, Chief of Child Protection UNMISS:
“The children are the future we should all work together to prepare this future. If we expect a bright future lets invest in the future right now and the future is children let’s ensure that all violations against children are eradicated. It is very simple. It requires education, it requires commitment and it requires resources.”

Also at hand to be grilled by the children, was an official from the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF), who underscored the importance of giving children a voice.

SOUNDBITE (English) Helene Ryeng, Communication Officer, UNICEF:
“Children should speak up about the issues that are affecting their lives. I understand it can be challenging because I know that in some areas in some places they are not used to being listened to. But is important that they are exercising their right to speak up and getting used to having their voice heard. So, I do encourage all children to speak up about issues that affecting them, addressing them with adults and other influential people in their lives.”

One of the country’s government officials encouraged the children to loudly articulate themselves to help unite the country’s leaders with the hope for a better future.

SOUNDBITE (English) Mary Kojo, Director General for child and social welfare South Sudan:
“We want to see that these children grow up as good future leaders, and we want them to be mentored by good leaders. And we want to be given that space where we can mentor them in a safe environment.”

With the day’s theme, ‘Humanitarian Action in Africa: Children’s Rights First’ in mind, the young broadcasters also had a chance to put the country’s most senior United Nations official and Head of UNMISS on the spot, prodding him on what he thought they, as children, should do.

SOUNDBITE (English) David Shearer, Special Representative of the Secretary General for South Sudan:
“I think children should dream, they should have hopes and they should have dreams. And I think is for us to try to fulfil those dreams not decide for them no you can’t do that it is about us saying yes, I hear you how can we help you fulfil your dream that’s is what adults t should be doing. So, my message to all the grown-ups out there is listen to your kids listen to their dreams and help them to get to where they want to go.”

The children took the reigns as adults listened, capping an eventful news day for the young broadcasters as they scored a win for themselves, their peers and the UN Radio, Miraya audiences.
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UNMISS
Alternate Title
unifeed190614f
Asset ID
2408480