WHO / MENTAL HEALTH CONFLICT

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11-Jun-2019 00:02:03
New estimates from the World Health Organization (WHO) highlight need for increased, sustained investment in the development of mental health services in areas affected by conflict. WHO

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STORY: WHO / MENTAL HEALTH CONFLICT
TRT: 02:03
SOURCE: WHO
RESTRICTIONS: EMBARGOED UNTIL 22:30 GMT 11 JUNE 2019
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 11 JUNE 2019, GENEVA SWITZERLAND / FILE

SHOTLIST:

FILE - GENEVA SWITZERLAND

1. Wide shot, exterior, WHO Headquarters

11 JUNE 2019, GENEVA SWITZERLAND

2. Med shot, Mark van Ommeren walking down stairs
3. SOUNDBITE (English) Mark van Ommeren, Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse, World Health Organization (WHO):
"The main findings are pretty serious. We find that, first of all, that one in five people have a mental health condition coming out of conflict.”
4. Med shot, van Ommeren talking to interviewer
5. SOUNDBITE (English) Mark van Ommeren, Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse, World Health Organization (WHO):
“The data are from countries, 39 countries who were in the last 10 years in conflict. So, we have one in five for any mental health condition. But even more concerningly so, that 9 percent, that’s almost one in 10 people, had a moderate or severe mental health condition, that means the condition is severe enough that you definitely would want to have access to a mental health service, which is, most people are not getting that access. So that’s very important.”
6. Med shot, van Ommeren talking to interviewer
7. SOUNDBITE (English) Mark van Ommeren, Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse, World Health Organization (WHO):
“It is clear that the rates of mental health conditions in conflict-affected populations are at least double that of populations that are not affected by conflict which, again, has huge implications for priority setting. All communities should have access to mental health care. Mental health is always a priority.”
8. Med shot, van Ommeren talking to interviewer
9. SOUNDBITE (English) Mark van Ommeren, World Health Organization (WHO):
“Policy implications are that in emergencies, we need to make available mental health care. And how do we do that? We make mental health care available at any point where health care is made available, so at any point where there is primary health care, secondary care, emergency hospital, there should be at least one person on staff who is capable of assessing and managing mental health conditions.”
10. Med shot, van Ommeren talking to interviewer
11. SOUNDBITE (English) Mark van Ommeren, World Health Organization (WHO):
“Given that these conditions last, this is more than just an acute emergency issue, it’s very important to build mental health services so that when the society recovers from the conflict, there is mental health services available."
12. Med shot, van Ommeren walking down stairs

STORYLINE:

New estimates from the World Health Organization (WHO) highlight need for increased, sustained investment in the development of mental health services in areas affected by conflict.

One in five people (22 percent) living in an area affected by conflict has depression, anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder, bipolar disorder or schizophrenia, and about 9 percent of conflict-affected populations have a moderate to severe mental health condition, according to an analysis of 129 studies published in The Lancet.

SOUNDBITE (English) Mark van Ommeren, World Health Organization (WHO):
"The main findings are pretty serious. We find that, first of all, that one in five people have a mental health condition coming out of conflict.”

The figures are substantially higher than the global estimate for these mental health conditions in the general population, which stands at one in 14 people. Depression and anxiety appeared to increase with age in conflict settings, and depression was more common among women than men.

SOUNDBITE (English) Mark van Ommeren, Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse, World Health Organization (WHO):
“The data are from countries, 39 countries who were in the last 10 years in conflict. So, we have one in five for any mental health condition. But even more concerningly so, that 9 percent, that’s almost one in 10 people, had a moderate or severe mental health condition, that means the condition is severe enough that you definitely would want to have access to a mental health service, which is, most people are not getting that access. So that’s very important.”

The findings suggest that past studies underestimated the burden of mental health conditions in conflict-affected areas – with higher rates of severe mental health conditions (5 percent at any one time in the new study compared to 3-4 percent over a 12-month-period in the 2005 estimates), and also of mild to moderate mental health conditions (17 percent at any one time in the new estimates compared to 15-20 percent over a 12-month period in previous estimates).

SOUNDBITE (English) Mark van Ommeren, Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse, World Health Organization (WHO):
“It is clear that the rates of mental health conditions in conflict-affected populations are at least double that of populations that are not affected by conflict which, again, has huge implications for priority setting. All communities should have access to mental health care. Mental health is always a priority.”

Overall, the mean prevalence was highest for mild mental health conditions (13 percent), for moderate the prevalence was 4 percent, and for severe conditions the prevalence was 5 percent.

SOUNDBITE (English) Mark van Ommeren, World Health Organization (WHO):
“Policy implications are that in emergencies, we need to make available mental health care. And how do we do that? We make mental health care available at any point where health care is made available, so at any point where there is primary health care, secondary care, emergency hospital, there should be at least one person on staff who is capable of assessing and managing mental health conditions.”

The revised estimates use research from 129 studies and data from 39 countries published between 1980 and August 2017, including 45 new studies published between 2013 and August 2017. Settings that have experienced conflict in the last 10 years were included. There was limited data for bipolar disorder and schizophrenia, so estimates for these conditions were based on global estimates and do not take into account any increased risk of these conditions in conflict settings. Cases were categorised as mild, moderate or severe. Natural disasters and public health emergencies, such as Ebola, were not included.

SOUNDBITE (English) Mark van Ommeren, World Health Organization (WHO):
“Given that these conditions last, this is more than just an acute emergency issue, it’s very important to build mental health services so that when the society recovers from the conflict, there is mental health services available."

Currently, there are major conflict-induced humanitarian crises in a number of countries, including Afghanistan, Iraq, Nigeria, Somalia, South Sudan, Syria, and Yemen. In 2016, the number of armed conflicts reached an all-time high, with 53 ongoing conflicts in 37 countries and 12 percent of the world’s population living in an active conflict zone. Nearly 69 million people worldwide have been forcibly displaced by violence and conflict, the highest number since World War II.
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WHO
Alternate Title
unifeed190611h
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