UN / DIGITAL COOPERATION REPORT

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10-Jun-2019 00:02:22
A new tech report, “the Age of Digital Interdependence,” was released by the UN High Level Panel on Digital Cooperation, almost a year after the Panel was launched by Secretary-General António Guterres. UNIFEED

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STORY: UN / DIGITAL COOPERATION REPORT
TRT: 02:22
SOURCE: UNIFEED
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LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 10 JUNE 2019, NEW YORK CITY / FILE

SHOTLIST:

FILE – RECENT, NEW YORK CITY

1. Wide shot, exterior United Nations headquarters

10 JUNE 2019, NEW YORK CITY

2. Wide shot, Trusteeship Council
3. Wide shot, dais
4. SOUNDBITE (English) António Guterres, Secretary-General, United Nations:
“While digital technology has created enormous opportunities, at the same time, the lack of preparation and cooperation by the international community is leading to some very bad outcomes. Social media enhances our connections to friends and family – but is used to broadcast hate and violence, disrupt social cohesion and invade privacy. We celebrate the achievements of artificial intelligence and automation, but we are wary of their weaponization, of the biases built into their algorithms, and of their impact on employment levels across the globe. This is an urgent, global issue.”
5. Wide shot, dais
6. SOUNDBITE (English) António Guterres, Secretary-General, United Nations:
“Although these technologies are new and revolutionary, we can learn from previous experience. Our predecessors came together in times of great geopolitical strain and divergence, to agree on acceptable use of nuclear technology, biotechnology and space flight. We must do the same.”
7. Wide shot, Trusteeship Council
8. Wide shot, press conference dais
9. SOUNDBITE (English) Nikolai Astrup, Minister of Digitalization, Norway:
“Inclusion in the digital age is at the heart of our report. Our conclusion is that digital technologies can me a decisive contribution to achieving the SDGs, but only if they are embedded in a broader set of measures to drive inclusion. Digital transformation and cooperation must also be guided by international law, including respect for human rights and fundamental freedoms. Focus should be on how to strengthen the application of international law to cyberspace, including norms and principles for acceptable state behaviour.”
10. Wide shot, dais
11. SOUNDBITE (English) Nikolai Astrup, Minister of Digitalization, Norway:
“We can’t win the fight against extreme poverty and inequality unless we ensure that everyone has affordable access to internet and fundamental literacy and digital skills needed to take advantage of this access. We have to make sure that we don’t leave behind the most vulnerable, the poor, women, people with disabilities, and political and ethnic minorities.”
12. Wide shot, end of presser

STORYLINE:

A new tech report, “the Age of Digital Interdependence”, was released today (10 Jun) by the UN High Level Panel on Digital Cooperation, almost a year after the Panel was launched by Secretary-General António Guterres.

The report explores the ways that digital technology can help achieve the UN’s 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development; how digital tech relates to human rights and security; and models for digital cooperation between different parts of society. Several recommendations are contained within the report, based on the three main areas.

At the launch of the report, Guterres said, “while digital technology has created enormous opportunities, at the same time, the lack of preparation and cooperation by the international community is leading to some very bad outcomes.”

Social media, he said, “enhances our connections to friends and family – but is used to broadcast hate and violence, disrupt social cohesion and invade privacy,” and added that while “we celebrate the achievements of artificial intelligence and automation,” we are “wary of their weaponization, of the biases built into their algorithms, and of their impact on employment levels across the globe. This is an urgent, global issue.”

The Secretary-General said that “although these technologies are new and revolutionary, we can learn from previous experience” and just as “our predecessors came together in times of great geopolitical strain and divergence, to agree on acceptable use of nuclear technology, biotechnology and space flight,” we “must do the same.”

The report lays out the risks faced by mankind, such as exploitative behaviour by private companies, a failure to realize human potential, and the stifling of necessary regulation.

At an earlier press encounter, the Minister of Digitalization of Norway, Nikolai Astrup, said “inclusion in the digital age is at the heart of our report. Our conclusion is that digital technologies can me a decisive contribution to achieving the SDGs, but only if they are embedded in a broader set of measures to drive inclusion. Digital transformation and cooperation must also be guided by international law, including respect for human rights and fundamental freedoms. Focus should be on how to strengthen the application of international law to cyberspace, including norms and principles for acceptable state behaviour.”

Astrup said, “we can’t win the fight against extreme poverty and inequality unless we ensure that everyone has affordable access to internet and fundamental literacy and digital skills needed to take advantage of this access. We have to make sure that we don’t leave behind the most vulnerable, the poor, women, people with disabilities, and political and ethnic minorities.”

At a time when around half the world’s population still has no access to the Internet, the panel calls for every adult to have affordable access to digital networks, as well as digitally-enabled financial and health services, by 2030.
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