TUVALU / GUTERRES CLIMATE CHANGE

Preview Language:   Original
17-May-2019 00:04:01
UN chief António Guterres expressed his solidarity with the government and the people of Tuvalu in their determined efforts to preserve their country from the negative impacts of climate change. UNITED NATIONS

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STORY: TUVALU / GUTERRES CLIMATE CHANGE
TRT: 4:06
SOURCE: UNITED NATIONS
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 17 MAY 2019, TUVALU

SHOTLIST:

1.Wide shot, Guterres looking out plane window
2.Various shots, Guterres looking at Tuvalu
3.Various shots, Guterres arriving and greeting Taukelina Finikasu, Minister of Foreign Affairs
4.Various shots, Guard of Honor Welcome Ceremony
5.Various shots, Garlanding
6.Various shots, Traditional Welcome
7.Wide shot, Presser with Prime Minister of Tuvalu
8.SOUNDBITE (English) António Guterres, Secretary-General, United Nations:
"But it’s necessary that those that are still causing the problems that affect Tuvalu understand that they need to change. They need to change their energy policies, their transportation policies, the way they manage their cities, the way they are using fossil fuels in order for this strike of climate change on Tuvalu can be stopped."
9.Various shots, Coconut Tree Planting
10.Various shots, Traditional Canoe Sail
11.Various shots, sea barrier
12.Various shots, Venerable Tuvaluan Family impacted by climate change
13.SOUNDBITE (Tuvalu) Faleta Tanielu, Tuvalu resident:
“We have to take care of ourselves when the big waves coming, and in the time of bad weather such as tsunami and others. Not the big tsunami, but sometimes the weather is too bad, when the first wave coming in, they have to take care of themselves. During rainy time they must go find canvas to protect their place from the rain and the wind.”
14.Various shots, Tuvaluan family walking on the shore
15.SOUNDBITE (English)Taniel Cannielu, Tuvalu resident:
“If king tide coming, all these places will be flooded.”
16.Various shots aerial shots Tuvalu

STORYLINE:

UN chief António Guterres expressed his solidarity with the government and the people of Tuvalu in their determined efforts to preserve their country from the negative impacts of climate change.

Upon his arrival, the Secretary-General was welcomed by the members of the Tuvaluan community and heard the concerns raised by the island’s government. Guterres also witnessed the sea barrier which is built to prevent high waves.

Speaking to reporters at a joint press conference with the Prime Minister of Tuvalu today (17 May), Guterres said, "but it’s necessary that those that are still causing the problems that affect Tuvalu understand that they need to change. They need to change their energy policies, their transportation policies, the way they manage their cities, the way they are using fossil fuels in order for this strike of climate change on Tuvalu can be stopped."

During his speech at lunch, the UN chief also voiced his concern over the vulnerability of the small islands in the face of climate change. He noted that the direct existential threat due to climate change that we are facing in the world is most pronounced here.

Guterres congratulated the Government of Tuvalu on its steadfast efforts to keep the country and the people safe and resilient. He appreciated the Prime Minister’s moral leadership on the subjects of climate change, loss and damage and displacement due to climate change.

The UN chief also commended the Prime Minister’s leadership role in the current constitutional review to bring the Constitution closer to its citizens and enhance accountability and social cohesion. He encouraged Tuvalu to ensure constitutional protection of human rights, including by expanding the Bill of Rights.

Guterres reiterated that the UN remains partner in addressing these crucial challenges and helping Tuvalu achieve its Sustainable Development Goals.

The Secretary-General also participated in a traditional Canoe Sail. Canoe is the livelihood of all Tuvaluan families in the past before the boats and ships. A canoe is used primarily for fishing, and its secondary uses is for transportation of goods from the islets to the main settlements and vice versa. A canoe is also used to carry the most important visitors like the Queen of England. A canoe ride is accorded to VIPs and is also used to welcome visiting dignitaries who arrive by boat.

Faleta Tanielu, a Tuvalu resident whose families living in houses that get inundated during high tides told reporters, “we have to take care of ourselves when the big waves coming, and in the time of bad weather such as tsunami and others. Not the big tsunami, but sometimes the weather is too bad, when the first wave coming in, they have to take care of themselves. During rainy time they must go find canvas to protect their place from the rain and the wind.”
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UNITED NATIONS
Alternate Title
unifeed190517a
Asset ID
2394956