GENEVA / DIENG HATE SPEECH

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01-May-2019 00:02:34
Following a shocking series of recent attacks of temples, churches and mosques in various parts of the world, a three-day summit to establish international guidelines for combating hate speech and to protect religious minorities – as well as refugees and migrants – concluded today at the United Nations in Geneva. UNTV CH

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STORY: GENEVA / DIENG HATE SPEECH
TRT: 2:34
SOURCE: UNTV CH
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 01 MAY 2019 GENEVA, SWITZERLAND

SHOTLIST:

1. Exterior shot, Palais des Nations
2. Wide shot, Room I, Palais des Nations
3. SOUNDBITE (English) Adama Dieng, Under-Secretary General, Special Adviser on the Prevention of Genocide:
“We are speaking about peace, we are speaking about justice, we are speaking about strong institutions. When we see the climate around the world today, just a couple of days ago we witnessed the horrific attack of a synagogue in the US, just before that we had a church burn in Burkina Faso, we had also mosque attack in New Zealand, we had Sri Lanka, so what’s wrong in this world?”
4. Wide shot, journalists
5. SOUNDBITE (English) Adama Dieng, Under-Secretary General, Special Adviser on the Prevention of Genocide:
“It’s easy to accuse the extreme right-wing leaders, but what are the others doing? They need to be more speaking out, they should be better mobilized but sometimes you see also the political opportunism even in those camps. So this is a matter that needs to be addressed in particular as I said today, in Europe. The sign of the ‘30s are resurfacing and we need to bring to an end this cynical politicians discourse. I mean, no migrant, no refugee is responsible for what is happening, of their failing economy, or whatever.”
6. Med shot, panel members
7. SOUNDBITE (English) Adama Dieng, Under-Secretary General, Special Adviser on the Prevention of Genocide:
“Big massacres start always with small actions and language. No one would forget that the holocaust was preceded by hate speech, hate crimes- when the Jews were being dehumanized, named after animal’s names. We witnessed the same in Rwanda, when the Tutsis were dehumanized, named after animal’s names: ‘cancrelat’, snake- so that was the beginning of the genocide. It started with those words. And what we are seeing today, is pretty close.”
8. Close up, journalist
9. Wide shot, Press room
10. Wide shot, journalists
11. Med shot, journalists

STORYLINE:

Following a shocking series of recent attacks of temples, churches and mosques in various parts of the world, a three-day summit to establish international guidelines for combating hate speech and to protect religious minorities – as well as refugees and migrants – concluded today (01 May) at the United Nations in Geneva.

The meeting, billed as “the Second Global Summit on Religion, Peace and Security”, has been described as a collective global response to the increasing divisions between nations and people, in a time when ultra-nationalist parties are challenging multilateralism and democracy.

Adama Dieng, Under-Secretary General, and Special Adviser on the Prevention of Genocide, told journalists on Wednesday, that the focus of the summit was to connect various relevant stakeholders - diplomats, politicians, religious leaders, academics and civil society – for a plan of action to better protect minorities.

“We are speaking about peace, we are speaking about justice, we are speaking about strong institutions”, Dieng, told journalists following the closing of the session. “When we see the climate around the world today, just a couple of days ago we witnessed the horrific attack of a synagogue in the US, just before that we had a church burn in Burkina Faso, we had also mosque attack in New Zealand, we had Sri Lanka, so what’s wrong in this world?” he asked.

Dieng’s comments follow remarks made a few days ago by UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres, who pointed to a "groundswell of intolerance" and "hate-based violence against people of various faiths" threatening the world.

Calling for the international community to stand up and speak out against xenophobia, discrimination and religious incitement, Dieng said today that it was “easy to accuse the extreme right-wing leaders, but what are the others doing?”

“They need to be speaking out more, they should be better mobilized but sometimes you see also the political opportunism even in those camps,” he said, referring to left-wing leaders. “So this is a matter that needs to be addressed in particular as I said today, in Europe, bringing an end to this ‘cynical politicians discourse’, and instead constructing a more constructive and peaceful dialogue," Dieng said. Referring to migrants who are being used as scapegoats by populist politicians, he stressed that “no migrant, no refugee is responsible for what is happening, of their failing economy.”

“Big massacres start always with small actions and language,” Dieng said, stressing the importance that hateful actions and speech play in the victimization of minorities. “No one would forget that the Holocaust was preceded by hate speech, hate crimes- when the Jews were being dehumanized, named after animal’s names. We witnessed the same in Rwanda, when the Tutsis were dehumanized, named after animal’s names: ‘cancrelat’, snake- so that was the beginning of the genocide. It started with those words. And what we are seeing today, is pretty close.”

The recommendations of this summit will be released next week and will aim to enhance the protection of religious minorities, refugees and migrants with strategies to counter hate-speech and to foster inclusivity.
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