WHO / WORLD HEALTH STATISTICS REPORT

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04-Apr-2019 00:02:52
Women outlive men everywhere in the world – particularly in wealthy countries, according to a new report by the World Health Organization, which for the first time disaggregated data by sex. WHO

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STORY: WHO / WORLD HEALTH STATISTICS REPORT
TRT: 2:52
SOURCE: WHO
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LANGUAGE: ENGLISH /NATS

DATELINE: 4 APRIL 2019, GENEVA, SWITZERLAND

SHOTLIST:

FILE

1. Wide shot, exterior, WHO HQ

4 APRIL 2019, GENEVA, SWITZERLAND

2. Wide shot, Asma talking to reporter
3. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Samira Asma, Assistant Director-General for Data, Analytics and Delivery, WHO:
“The world health statistics report that is being launched today tells us about the life, death and health of the world’s population. It tells us about the life expectancy of the people both men and women in high and low-income countries as well as the reasons for increased or reduced life expectancies.”
4. Close up, copy of the report in Asma’s hands
5. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Samira Asma, Assistant Director-General for Data, Analytics and Delivery, WHO:
“The key finding from this report is that the life expectancy of men and women in high income countries are different than the life expectancy for both in the low and middle-income countries but when we look at life expectancy of women in low income countries which is much shorter, relatively shorter than their counterparts in high income countries and this gap ought to be reduced and closed. The other finding is that men access healthcare services at a lesser rate in both high and low-income countries and also they are exposed to unhealthy behaviors including smoking, alcohol drinking and unhealthy diet.”
6. Close up, copy of the report in Asma’s hands
7. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Samira Asma, Assistant Director-General for Data, Analytics and Delivery, WHO:
“The launch of the world health statistics report today coincides with an important theme for the world health day which is universal health coverage and access to primary health care services and the findings of this report underscores that maternal mortality is the leading cause of premature deaths among women in low income countries and that needs to be taken seriously and addressed immediately and now. The report provides evidence to policymakers to take action and improve the health status of the people in their countries.”
8. Tilt down, Asma’s face to report
9. Close up, copy of the report in Asma’s hands
10. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Samira Asma, Assistant Director-General for Data, Analytics and Delivery, WHO:
“Data is lacking in a number of countries and the WHO is now poised to collect and curate data so that we can look at policies and programmes that countries ought to prioritize so that the policies and programmes will be better for both genders, men and women alike.”
11. Wide shot, Asma talking to reporter

STORYLINE:

“The World Health Statistics 2019”, released Wednesday (4 Apr), says that the gap between men’s and women’s life expectancy is narrowest where women lack access to health services. In low-income countries, where services are scarcer, 1 in 41 women dies from a maternal cause, compared with 1 in 3300 in high-income countries. In more than 90 per cent of low-income countries, there are fewer than 4 nursing and midwifery personnel per 1000 people.

SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Samira Asma, Assistant Director-General for Data, Analytics and Delivery, WHO:
“The world health statistics report that is being launched today tells us about the life, death and health of the world’s population. It tells us about the life expectancy of the people both men and women in high and low-income countries as well as the reasons for increased or reduced life expectancies.”

Attitudes to healthcare differ. Where men and women face the same disease, men often seek health care less than women. In countries with generalized HIV epidemics, for example, men are less likely than women to take an HIV test, less likely to access antiretroviral therapy and more likely to die of AIDS-related illnesses than women. Similarly, male TB patients appear to be less likely to seek care than female TB patients.

SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Samira Asma, Assistant Director-General for Data, Analytics and Delivery, WHO:
“The key finding from this report is that the life expectancy of men and women in high income countries are different than the life expectancy for both in the low and middle-income countries but when we look at life expectancy of women in low income countries which is much shorter, relatively shorter than their counterparts in high income countries and this gap ought to be reduced and closed. The other finding is that men access healthcare services at a lesser rate in both high and low-income countries and also they are exposed to unhealthy behaviors including smoking, alcohol drinking and unhealthy diet.”

The report also highlights the difference in causes of death between men and women – some biological, some influenced by environmental and societal factors, and some impacted by availability of and uptake of health services.Of the 40 leading causes of death, 33 causes contribute more to reduced life expectancy in men than in women. In 2016, the probability of a 30-year-old dying from a noncommunicable disease before 70 years of age was 44% higher in men than women.

Global suicide mortality rates were 75% higher in men than in women in 2016. Death rates from road injury are more than twice as high in men than in women from age 15, and mortality rates due to homicide are 4 times higher in men than in women.

Published to coincide with World Health Day on 7 April, which this year focuses on primary health care as the foundation of universal health coverage, the new WHO statistics highlight the need to improve access to primary health care worldwide and to increase uptake.

SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Samira Asma, Assistant Director-General for Data, Analytics and Delivery, WHO:
“The launch of the world health statistics report today coincides with an important theme for the world health day which is universal health coverage and access to primary health care services and the findings of this report underscores that maternal mortality is the leading cause of premature deaths among women in low income countries and that needs to be taken seriously and addressed immediately and now. The report provides evidence to policymakers to take action and improve the health status of the people in their countries.”

Between 2000 and 2016, global life-expectancy at birth increased by 5.5 years, from 66.5 to 72.0 years. Healthy life expectancy at birth - the number of years one can expect to live in full health- increased from 58.5 years in 2000 to 63.3 years in 2016. Life expectancy remains strongly affected by income. In low-income countries, life expectancy is 18.1 years lower than in high-income countries. One child in every 14 born in a low-income country will die before their fifth birthday.

SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Samira Asma, Assistant Director-General for Data, Analytics and Delivery, WHO:
“Data is lacking in a number of countries and the WHO is now poised to collect and curate data so that we can look at policies and programmes that countries ought to prioritize so that the policies and programmes will be better for both genders, men and women alike.”

For the first time, this year, WHO’s Global Health Statistics have been disaggregated by sex. This new analysis has provided insights into the health and needs of people around the world. But many countries still struggle to provide gender disaggregated information.
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