SOUTH SUDAN / MINES

Preview Language:   Original
02-Apr-2019 00:04:04
The United Nations Mine Action Service (UNMAS) recently disposed of the one millionth unexploded ordnance in South Sudan. Since 2004, its teams have cleared 1800 minefields with just 200 remaining. UNMISS

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Description
STORY: SOUTH SUDAN / MINES
TRT: 4:04
SOURCE: UNMISS
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: JUBA ARABIC / NATS

DATELINE: 19 - 20 MARCH, NESITU - JUBA, SOUTH SUDAN

SHOTLIST:

19 MARCH 2019, NESITU, SOUTH SUDAN

1. Various shots, victim of unexploded ordnances
2. SOUNDBITE (Juba Arabic) Mary, Nesitu Resident:
“The doctor has said that after two months I can go back and have a prosthetic. But I’ve lost my leg. I have a small baby. How am I going to survive? Who is going to help me?”
3. Pan right, local community sitting
4. Med shot, local community sitting
5. Various shots, demining operation
6. SOUNDBITE (English) Andrew Majak, deminer, United Nations Mine Action Service (UNMAS):
“I do this to help my people, all the South Sudanese people – to help them, mostly children and women.”
7. Various shots, demining operation

20 MARCH 2019, JUBA, SOUTH SUDAN

8. SOUNDBITE (English) Richard Boulter, Programme Manager for South Sudan, United Nations Mine Action Service (UNMAS):
“One aspect of the job is clearing the area. Another aspect of it is telling people what’s gone on, what’s going on, and promoting confidence so that land gets used. But also, what we really don’t want to do is clear one area, and then drive off to another, and then come back and get a report there was something else just down the road from the first place. So, wherever we work, we need to engage with the local people and hear their concerns and address their concerns; and address their and deal with them, and leave people confident and, for our teams, to leave an area confident they have made it safe.”

19 MARCH 2019, NESITU, SOUTH SUDAN

9. Various shots, community liaison officers at school
10. Various shots, children
11. SOUNDBITE (English) Mary Ajok, Mine Risk Educator, United Nations Mine Action Service (UNMAS):
“The local community, they can ask, what do these things look like? How did these people lay them? We tell them they are buried under the ground and you cannot see them so whenever you move in the bush or anywhere, you follow the right path. These are the questions that they ask. They also ask, what should they do if they come across it? We tell them to stay away from it or if you get yourself in a minefield, stop still, call for help.”
11. Wide shot, cleared area
12. Med Shot, cleared area
13. Closed shot, remnants of unexploded ordinates

STORYLINE:

It should have been a simple journey from her home in the village of Nesitu to the nearby bush to collect firewood. Instead, cutting across the land on a little-used path, has changed Mary’s life forever.

One innocent step resulted in an horrific accident that caused the loss of her lower leg and emotional trauma that will last a lifetime, as she became the latest victim of the countless unexploded ordnances that litter South Sudan after its long and brutal war for independence.

SOUNDBITE (Juba Arabic) Mary, Nesitu Resident:
“The doctor has said that after two months I can go back and have a prosthetic. But I’ve lost my leg. I have a small baby. How am I going to survive? Who is going to help me?”

The consequences of the tragic accident will affect Mary’s future but also that of her baby and elderly parents. She was the family’s sole provider but now doesn’t know how she will support them. To prevent injuries to other community members, the UN Mine Action Service (UNMAS) quickly swung into action, sending a team to survey and clear any unexploded hazards in Nesitu.

SOUNDBITE (English) Andrew Majak, deminer, United Nations Mine Action Service (UNMAS):
“I do this to help my people, all the South Sudanese people – to help them, mostly children and women.”

UNMAS recently disposed of the one millionth unexploded ordnance in South Sudan. Since 2004, its teams have cleared 1800 minefields with just 200 remaining. About 680 battlefields have been demined with just 37 to go and 213 cluster munition strike areas have been cleared, leaving 123 to declare safe.

Infrastructure is also an important focus, with more than 1000 water points, 300 markets, 173 health clinics and 217 schools made safe for communities to access.

This work, not only, protects people from immediate harm, but also enables displaced families to return to their land and rebuild their lives, whether it is farming, building homes or other basic services.

SOUNDBITE (English) Richard Boulter, Programme Manager for South Sudan, United Nations Mine Action Service (UNMAS):
“One aspect of the job is clearing the area. Another aspect of it is telling people what’s gone on, what’s going on, and promoting confidence so that land gets used. But also, what we really don’t want to do is clear one area, and then drive off to another, and then come back and get a report there was something else just down the road from the first place. So, wherever we work, we need to engage with the local people and hear their concerns and address their concerns; and address their and deal with them, and leave people confident and, for our teams, to leave an area confident they have made it safe.”

About 90 percent of the 1000 personnel working for UNMAS in South Sudan are from local communities. While many are hands-on deminers, others educate the community about how to recognise, mitigate and report explosive hazards.

SOUNDBITE (English) Mary Ajok, Mine Risk Educator, United Nations Mine Action Service (UNMAS):
“The local community, they can ask, what do these things look like? How did these people lay them? We tell them they are buried under the ground and you cannot see them so whenever you move in the bush or anywhere, you follow the right path. These are the questions that they ask. They also ask, what should they do if they come across it? We tell them to stay away from it or if you get yourself in a minefield, stop still, call for help.”

As peace slowly returns to South Sudan, the priority for UNMAS is to help give confidence to refugees and internally displaced people going back to their homes by ensuring there is safe ground and a safe home for all.
Series
Category
Geographic Subjects
Creator
UNMISS
Alternate Title
unifeed190402b
Asset ID
2374523