UNICEF / WATER UNDER FIRE

Preview Language:   Original
21-Mar-2019 00:01:52
A new report of the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) said that children living in protracted conflicts are three times more likely to die from water-related diseases than from violence. UNICEF

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EMBARGO 00:01 GMT 22 MARCH 2019

STORY: UNICEF / WATER UNDER FIRE
TRT: 1:52
SOURCE: UNICEF
RESTRICTIONS: PLEASE CREDIT UNICEF ON SCREEN
LANGUAGES: ARABIC / NATS

DATELINEl 30 JANUARY 2018, JUBA, SOUTH SUDAN

SHOTLIST:

1. Wide shot, Charity Arko walking to water source
2. Wide shot, Charity Arko collecting water
3. Med shot, dirty water
4. Wide shot, Charity Arko carrying water home
5. Wide shot, sign identifying borehole location
6. Wide shot, Charity Arko carrying jerry cans to well
7. Wide shot, woman pumps water at the borehole
8. Close up, water being pumped into jerry can
9. Wide shot, Charity Arko carrying clean water home
10. Med shot, Charity gives daughter a cup of clean water to drink
11. Close up, Charity’s daughter drinks clean water from a cup
12. Med shot, Charity washes dishes with clean water
13. Med shot, Charity poses with her four smiling children
14. SOUNDBITE (Arabic) Charity Arko, local resident:
“If we had money then these children could drink clean water. The problem is that I cannot afford clean water. This is why I have to give them this dirty water. But when I do, I think, ‘Why do I have to give them this dirty water?’ I think about how to get clean water, but I cannot get it.”
15. SOUNDBITE (Arabic) Charity Arko, local resident:
“This water from the well is clean. If you drink good water that has been treated, then you will not be sick.”

STORYLINE:

A new report of the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) released today (22 Mar) said that children under the age of 15 living in countries affected by protracted conflict are, on average, almost three times more likely to die from diarrhoeal diseases caused by a lack of safe water, sanitation and hygiene than by direct violence.

Charity Arko and her three children fled violence in South Sudan and now live on the outskirts of Juba. They have very little access to clean water. Charity is faced with a terrible dilemma every day: give her children dirty water or let them die of thirst.

SOUNDBITE (Arabic) Charity Arko, local resident:
“If we had money then these children could drink clean water. The problem is that I cannot afford clean water. This is why I have to give them this dirty water. But when I do, I think, ‘Why do I have to give them this dirty water?’ I think about how to get clean water, but I cannot get it.”

UNICEF drilled a well in Charity’s neighborhood, so now she access to clean water for her children. UNICEF provides clean water for 800,000 people across South Sudan.

SOUNDBITE (Arabic) Charity Arko, local resident:
“This water from the well is clean. If you drink good water that has been treated, then you will not be sick.”

The new UNICEF report called Water Under Fire looks at mortality rates in 16 countries going through prolonged conflicts and finds that, in most of them, children under the age of five are more than 20 times more likely to die from diarrhoea-related deaths linked to lack of access to safe water and sanitation than direct violence.

Without safe and effective water, sanitation and hygiene services, children are at risk of malnutrition and preventable diseases including diarrhoea, typhoid, cholera and polio. Girls are particularly affected: They are vulnerable to sexual violence as they collect water or venture out to use latrines. They deal with affronts to their dignity as they bathe and manage menstrual hygiene. And they miss classes during menstruation if their schools have no suitable water and sanitation facilities.

These threats are exacerbated during conflict when deliberate and indiscriminate attacks destroy infrastructure, injure personnel and cut off the power that keeps water, sanitation and hygiene systems running. Armed conflict also limits access to essential repair equipment and consumables such as fuel or chlorine – which can be depleted, rationed, diverted or blocked from delivery. Far too often, essential services are deliberately denied.

UNICEF works in conflict countries to provide safe drinking water and adequate sanitation services through improving and repairing water systems, trucking water, setting up latrines and promoting awareness of hygiene practices.
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UNICEF
Alternate Title
unifeed190321a
Asset ID
2370027