ILO / GENDER WORK GAPS

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07-Mar-2019 00:01:41
A future of work in which women will no longer lag behind men is within reach, but it will take a quantum leap, not just hesitant incremental steps, to get there, according to a new report by the International Labour Organization. ILO

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STORY: ILO / GENDER WORK GAPS
TRT: 1:41
SOURCE: ILO
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH /NATS

DATELINE: 6 MARCH 2019, GENEVA, SWITZERLAND

SHOTLIST:

1. Wide shot, press room
2. Med shot, Tomei speaking
3. SOUNDBITE (English) Manuela Tomei, Director, Conditions of Work and Equality Department, ILO
“Strong laws and policies that promote not only equality of treatment and opportunity, but also equality of outcomes. In other words, it’s not just about prohibiting discrimination or removing laws and policies that discriminate against women, but it’s also about putting in place proactive measures, such as for instance, equal pay certification processes, setting quotas or numerical targets in order to increase the share of women for instance in managerial positions.”
4. Cutaway, reporter reading report
5. SOUNDBITE (English) Shauna Olney, Chief, Gender, Equality and Diversity & ILOAIDS Branch, ILO:
“The report shows that over the past twenty years, in terms of the key labour market indicators, the gender gaps are not closing in any meaningful way. So if we are going to have a change we really do need a quantum leap and there is some particularly concerning findings in the report.”
6. Cutaway, reporter with report
7. SOUNDBITE (English) Shauna Olney, Chief, Gender, Equality and Diversity & ILOAIDS Branch, ILO:
“For example, if we look at the motherhood employment penalty; so the difference between women with or without children, how often they are getting into employment, what their employment rate is? That gap is actually increasing and over the past 10 years, that has increased for almost 40 % globally and that should really concern us. So, if we don’t want to reproduce the inequalities of the past and we want a future of work that is truly gender equal we will have to make major changes and we will have to make them now.”
8. Close up, report

STORYLINE:

A future of work in which women will no longer lag behind men is within reach, but it will take a quantum leap, not just hesitant incremental steps, to get there, according to a new report by the International Labour Organization.

In advance of International Women’s Day marked every March 8, the International Labour Organization (ILO) launched a report titled “A Quantum leap for gender equality: For a better future of work for all.”

Speaking to reporters in Geneva Wednesday (6 Mar), Manuela Tomei, Director of the Conditions of Work and Equality Department of ILO said “strong laws and policies that promote not only equality of treatment and opportunity, but also equality of outcomes. In other words, it’s not just about prohibiting discrimination or removing laws and policies that discriminate against women, but it’s also about putting in place proactive measures, such as for instance, equal pay certification processes, setting quotas or numerical targets in order to increase the share of women for instance in managerial positions.”

The report is the culmination of five years of work under the ILO’s Women at Work Centenary Initiative.

SOUNDBITE (English) Shauna Olney, Chief, Gender, Equality and Diversity & ILOAIDS Branch, ILO:
“The report shows that over the past twenty years, in terms of the key labour market indicators, the gender gaps are not closing in any meaningful way. So if we are going to have a change we really do need a quantum leap and there is some particularly concerning findings in the report.”

Olney also said that the so called “the motherhood employment penalty” or the difference between women with or without children, how often they are getting into employment, has actually increasing and over the past 10 years, that has increased for almost 40 % globally.

She said “so, if we don’t want to reproduce the inequalities of the past and we want a future of work that is truly gender equal we will have to make major changes and we will have to make them now.”

The report finds that in the last 27 years the difference in the employment rates for men and women has shrunk by less than two percentage points. In 2018, women are still 26 percentage points less likely to be in employment than men. This contrasts with the findings of an ILO-Gallup 2017 global report on women’s and men’s preferences about women’s participation in paid work, which found that 70 per cent of women prefer to have a job rather than staying at home and that men agree.
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ILO
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unifeed190307a
Asset ID
2364872