UN / RUSSIA SALISBURY

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04-Mar-2019 00:02:34
Russian deputy ambassador Dmitry Polyanskiy said there was a “presumption of guilt” of his country in the Salisbury incident in that Russia was being asked to prove it was “not a murder” adding that this was “very absurd from any point of view and absolutely not professional, to put it mildly.” UNIFEED

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STORY: UN / RUSSIA SALISBURY
TRT: 2:34
SOURCE: UNIFEED
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 04 MARCH 2019, NEW YORK CITY

SHOTLIST:

FILE - NEW YORK CITY

1. Wide shot, UNHQ exterior

04 MARCH 2019, NEW YORK CITY

2. Wide shot, press room
3. SOUNDBITE (English) Dmitry A. Polyanskiy, Deputy Permanent Representative of the Russian Federation to the United Nations:
“The absolute must in such a situation would be to initiate contact with the Russian Consul. If the Russian Consul faces a Russian citizen and the Russian citizen says ‘well, I don’t want to deal with the Russian side anymore;’ ok, it’s their right. But, there should be such a contact, physical contact, not through video, not through documents. This is kind of basics of international relations, and these basics are being violated. We don’t know the Skripals, are they alive? Are they in Britain? Are they elsewhere? We don’t know anything. And this situation is considered to be normal by our British colleagues. It’s not normal for us.”
4. Wide shot, journalists
5. SOUNDBITE (English) Dmitry A. Polyanskiy, Deputy Permanent Representative of the Russian Federation to the United Nations:
“Actually, my impression is that the British side right now got everything it wanted. So, it created the impression that Russia is behind this. There is a lot of mystery so there is no proof, but the public opinion, if you ask people in the street, if you ask politicians, they will say ‘yeah of course, it is proven that Russia was behind the Salisbury attack.’ But, there are no concrete facts, there is no concrete evidence.”
6. Wide shot, journalists
7. SOUNDBITE (English) Dmitry A. Polyanskiy, Deputy Permanent Representative of the Russian Federation to the United Nations:
“Why would Russia really poison the Skripals? Why would we seek to get this man who was eight years in our prison, to whom we had access? Why would we target him and his daughter with such a strange way, again, to kill? And if we tried to kill him, why didn’t we kill him actually? Were these agents kind of new comers, they were interns? I don’t know. Why didn’t they do it if they were asked to do it?”
8. Wide shot, Polyanskiy at press conference
9. SOUNDBITE (English) Dmitry A. Polyanskiy, Deputy Permanent Representative of the Russian Federation to the United Nations:
“This is a new method of international relations, accusing somebody. You know about the presumption of innocence, so in this case there is presumption of guilt. You’re being accused of something and please prove that you didn’t do it. We don’t need to prove that you did it, but you prove that you didn’t do it. Prove to us that you are not a murder. I don’t know. This is very absurd from any point of view and absolutely not professional, to put it mildly.”
10. Wide shot, press room

STORYLINE:

Russian deputy ambassador Dmitry Polyanskiy said there was a “presumption of guilt” of his country in the Salisbury incident in that Russia was being asked to prove it was “not a murder” adding that this was “very absurd from any point of view and absolutely not professional, to put it mildly.”

Speaking to reporters in New York today (04 Mar) exactly one year after the incident, Polyanskiy said police in the United Kingdom (UK) had not been able to support the political version of the events in the poisoning of the Russian spy Sergei Skripal and his daughter Yulia with facts and proof. He stressed that all attempts by his country to cooperate with UK authorities had been rejected, adding that the UK was expecting Russia to either admit guilt or that they lost control of those who committed the attack.

Polyanskiy said Russia was worried about its citizens as it did not have any information about their whereabouts or even if they were still alive. He added, “The absolute must in such a situation would be to initiate contact with the Russian Consul. If the Russian Consul faces a Russian citizen and the Russian citizen says ‘well, I don’t want to deal with the Russian side anymore;’ ok, it’s their right. But, there should be such a contact, physical contact, not through video, not through documents. This is kind of basics of international relations, and these basics are being violated.”

The Russian ambassador said the last information they received on the Skripals was through a video last May of Yulia. He claimed she was reading from a text written by non-native Russian speaker, which had raised more questions than answers.

Polyanskiy said the British side “got everything it wanted” by swaying public opinion against Russia without “concrete evidence.”

SOUNDBITE (English) Dmitry A. Polyanskiy, Deputy Permanent Representative of the Russian Federation to the United Nations:
“Why would Russia really poison the Skripals? Why would we seek to get this man who was eight years in our prison, to whom we had access? Why would we target him and his daughter with such a strange way, again, to kill? And if we tried to kill him, why didn’t we kill him actually? Were these agents kind of new comers, they were interns? I don’t know. Why didn’t they do it if they were asked to do it?”

The Russian ambassador said his country had no motive to kill the father and daughter and stressed that such a move would be foolish ahead of presidential elections and the hosting of the World Cup. He noted that his country would try to use official channels to reach the Skripals adding that Russia has reason to qualify their situation as forced detention or even abduction.
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