GENEVA / SAFE LISTENING

Preview Language:   Original
12-Feb-2019 00:01:46
The World Health Organization warned today that over a billion young people are at risk of hearing loss “simply by doing what they really enjoy doing a lot, which is listening regularly to music through their headphones over their devices.” UNTV CH

Available Language: English
Type
Language
Format
Acquire
Original
HD PAL
Original
SD PAL
Original
HD NTSC
/
English
Other Formats
Description
STORY: GENEVA / SAFE LISTENING
TRT: 1:46
SOURCE: UNTV CH
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 12 FEBRUARY 2019, GENEVA, SWITZERLAND

SHOTLIST:

FILE - NEW YORK CITY

1. Wide shot, Palais des Nations exterior

12 FEBRUARY 2019, GENEVA, SWITZERLAND

2. Wide shot, press room
3. Med shot, journalist with laptop
4. SOUNDBITE (English) Shelly Chadha, Technical Officer, Prevention of Deafness and Hearing Loss, World Health Organization (WHO):
“Over a billion young people are at risk of hearing loss simply by doing what they really enjoy doing a lot, which is listening regularly to music through their headphones over their devices.”
5. Close up, journalists typing
6. SOUNDBITE (English) Shelly Chadha, Technical Officer, Prevention of Deafness and Hearing Loss, World Health Organization (WHO):
“At the moment, we don’t really have anything solid other than our instinct to tell us: ‘are we doing this right, or is this something that is going to lead to tinnitus and hearing loss a few years down the line?”
7. Wide shot, journalists
8. SOUNDBITE (English) Shelly Chadha, Technical Officer, Prevention of Deafness and Hearing Loss, World Health Organization (WHO):
“Think of it like driving on a highway but without a speedometer in your car or a speed limit. And what we have proposed is that your smartphone come fitted with a speedometer, with a measurement system that tells you how much sound you’re getting and tells you if you’re going over the limit.”
9. Med shot, journalists
10. SOUNDBITE (English) Shelly Chadha, Technical Officer, Prevention of Deafness and Hearing Loss, World Health Organization (WHO):
“What we propose are certain features like automatic limiting of, or automatic volume reduction and parental control of the volume so that when somebody goes over their sound limit they have the option that the device will automatically reduce the volume to a level which is not going to harm their ears.”
11. Various shots, journalists

STORYLINE:

More than one billion ages 12 to 35 risk irreversible hearing loss from exposure to loud sounds such as music played on their smartphone, UN health experts said today (12 Feb) as they unveiled new guidelines to make it safer to do so.

The recommendations to prevent deafness and related conditions such as tinnitus, commonly experienced as a ringing sound in your ears, include functions on personal audio devices that monitor how loud and for how long people listen to music.

“Over a billion young people are at risk of hearing loss simply by doing what they really enjoy doing a lot, which is listening regularly to music through their headphones over their devices,” said Dr Shelly Chadha, Technical Officer, Prevention of Deafness and Hearing Loss at the World Health Organization (WHO).

She added, “At the moment, we don’t really have anything solid other than our instinct to tell us: are we doing this right or is this something that is going to lead to tinnitus and hearing loss a few years down the line.”

The joint World Health Organization (WHO) and International Telecommunications Union (ITU) initiative is an attempt to tackle the lack of awareness about what constitutes too much noise, amid data showing that one in two young people listen to unsafe levels of sound through personal audio devices including smartphones, whose use continues to grow globally.

Today, hearing loss which is not addressed is estimated to cost the global economy 750 million USD according to WHO.

“Think of it like driving on a highway but without a speedometer in your car or a speed limit,” Dr Chadha explained. “And what we have proposed is that your smartphone comes fitted with a speedometer, with a measurement system that tells you how much sound you’re getting and tells you if you’re going over the limit.”

A parental volume control option is also included in the UN recommendations to industry, which participated in two years of discussions, along with experts from government, consumer bodies and civil society.

The guidelines also propose using technology to generate individualized listener profiles by monitoring how much people use their audio devices, then letting them know how safely – or not – they have been listening.
“What we propose are certain features like automatic limiting of, or automatic volume reduction and parental control of the volume,” explained Dr Chadha, “So that when somebody goes over their sound limit they have the option that the device will automatically reduce the volume to a level which is not going to harm their ears.”

According to the WHO, more than one in 20 people has disabling hearing loss which impacts on their quality of life amounting to 432 million adults and 34 million children.

Most sufferers live in poor and middle-income countries, the UN agency noted, adding that by 2050, more than 900 billion people will have significantly impaired hearing.

WHO said around half of all cases of hearing loss could be prevented through public health measures. Its recommendations coming ahead of World Hearing Day on Sunday 3 March.
Series
Category
Topical Subjects
Creator
UNTV CH
Alternate Title
unifeed190212a
Asset ID
2356796