WHO / WORLD CANCER DAY

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04-Feb-2019 00:02:50
On the occasion of World Cancer Day, the World Health Organization (WHO) said it is focusing on the global health challenge of cervical cancer and new momentum to eliminate the disease, one of the leading killers of women worldwide. WHO

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STORY: WHO / WORLD CANCER DAY
TRT: 2:50
SOURCE: WHO
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LANGUAGE: ENGLISH/ FRENCH / NATS

DATELINE: 31 JANUARY 2019, GENEVA, SWITZERLAND / FILE

SHOTLIST:

FILE - GENEVA, SWITZERLAND

1. Wide shot, WHO flag

31 JANUARY 2019, GENEVA, SWITZERLAND

2. Wide shot, Simelela and Broutet walking down hallway
3. SOUNDBITE (English) Princess Nothemba Simelela, Assistant Director-General for Family, Women, Children and Adolescents, World Health Organization:
"The message for women and young girls out there is we've got a vaccine that can prevent you from getting cervical cancer. Therefore, the sooner you access this vaccine, ask ensure that you're vaccinated, the better."

FILE - APRIL 2014, SAO PAULO, BRAZIL

4. Med shot, healthcare professional giving child HPV vaccine
5. Med shot, child receiving HPV vaccine
6. Wide shot, HVP vaccine campaign poster

31 JANUARY 2019, GENEVA, SWITZERLAND

7. SOUNDBITE (English) Princess Nothemba Simelela, Assistant Director-General for Family, Women, Children and Adolescents, World Health Organization:
“The last report from the global cancer survey showed us that 330,000 women are dying annually, but what is sad about this is that nine out of ten of these deaths occur in lower-income and low-income countries. This means it's a disease of inequity. But what is extremely exciting is that we've got the right tools, we've got the right technology, we've got the right mechanisms to treat this disease.”
8. Med shot, Simelela and Broutet walking down hallway
9. SOUNDBITE (French) Nathalie Broutet, Department of Reproductive Health, World Health Organization:
“It must be understood that there are 570,000 new cases of cervical cancer every year in the world, and that the distribution of these cases is very uneven. There is concentration in the countries of southern Africa, in Latin America and in some Asian countries, and that is our challenge. Cervical cancer is a cancer that can be prevented, treated and healed. So, we have to make sure that in countries where there are the greatest numbers of cervical cancer, we reduce the inequality that exists and that we increase access to interventions that we know are effective for women who should be treated or those for which cervical cancer can be prevented.”

FILE - APRIL 2014, SAO PAULO, BRAZIL

10. Wide shot, healthcare professional speaking to class of girl about HPV vaccine
11. Med shot, healthcare professional speaking to class of girl about HPV vaccine
12. Med shot, Healthcare professional loading vaccine into syringe
13. Med shot, child receiving HPV vaccine
14. Close up, information pamphlet
15. Wide shot, child speaking to healthcare professional
16. Med shot, child receiving HPV vaccine

STORYLINE:

On the occasion of World Cancer Day, the World Health Organization (WHO) said it is focusing on the global health challenge of cervical cancer and new momentum to eliminate the disease, one of the leading killers of women worldwide.

In an interview, WHO Assistant Director-General for Family, Women, Children and Adolescents Princess Nothemba Simelela had a message.

SOUNDBITE (English) Princess Nothemba Simelela, Assistant Director-General for Family, Women, Children and Adolescents, World Health Organization:
"The message for women and young girls out there is we've got a vaccine that can prevent you from getting cervical cancer. Therefore, the sooner you access this vaccine, ask ensure that you're vaccinated, the better."

Simelela said cervical cancer was one of the most prominent challenges facing the world as it was the fourth largest killer of women, claiming some 330,000 lives annually. She said, “What is sad about this is that nine out of ten of these deaths occur in lower-income and low-income countries. This means it's a disease of inequity. But what is extremely exciting is that we've got the right tools, we've got the right technology, we've got the right mechanisms to treat this disease.”

WHO said many women in developing countries do not have access to key cervical cancer services that can prevent, detect and treat the disease, as well as high-quality palliative care.

Nathalie Broutet, from WHO’s Department of Reproductive Health, said there are 570,000 new cases of cervical cancer every year in the world, concentrated mainly in the countries of southern Africa, in Latin America and in some Asian countries. She said, “Cervical cancer is a cancer that can be prevented, treated and healed. So, we have to make sure that in countries where there are the greatest numbers of cervical cancer, we reduce the inequality that exists and that we increase access to interventions that we know are effective for women who should be treated or those for which cervical cancer can be prevented.”

WHO said urgent action is needed to scale up implementation of proven cost-effective measures towards the elimination of cervical cancer as a global public health problem. These actions include vaccination against human papillomavirus, especially of girls age nine to 14, screening and treatment of pre-cancer, early detection and prompt treatment of early invasive cancers and palliative care. WHO said this would require political commitment and greater international cooperation and support for equitable access, including strategies for resource mobilization.
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WHO
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unifeed190204a
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