UN / CLIMATE CHANGE SECURITY

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25-Jan-2019 00:02:06
Addressing a Security Council open debate on the impact of climate-related disasters on international peace and security, Under-Secretary-General for Political and Peacebuilding Affairs, Rosemary Di Carlo, said “these trends represent a security risk for the entire world,” but “are felt most strongly in regions that are already vulnerable.” UNIFEED

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STORY: UN / CLIMATE CHANGE SECURITY
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DATELINE: 25 JANUARY 2019, NEW YORK CITY / FILE

SHOTLIST:

FILE – RECENT, NEW YORK CITY

1. Wide shot, exterior United Nations headquarters

25 JANUARY 2019, NEW YORK CITY

2. Wide shot, Security Council
3. SOUNDBITE (English) Rosemary DiCarlo, Under-Secretary-General for Political Affairs, United Nations:
“A report released by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change last October predicted more heat waves, heavier rain events, higher sea levels, and more severe damage to agriculture. These trends represent a security risk for the entire world. However, their consequences are felt most strongly in regions that are already vulnerable, where climate change and extreme weather compound existing grievances and threats.”
4. Med shot, delegates
5. SOUNDBITE (English) Rosemary DiCarlo, Under-Secretary-General for Political Affairs, United Nations:
“In recent months, the Council has recognized the adverse effects of climate change, among other factors, on the stability of Mali, Somalia, West Africa and the Sahel, Central Africa, and the Sudan. The Secretary-General, for his part, has articulated a broad vision for prevention and made it a priority to improve our ability to address wider stresses and shocks that can exacerbate crises and lead to violent conflict.”
6. Med shot, delegates
7. SOUNDBITE (English) Pavel Kabat, Chief Scientist, World Meteorological Organization:
“Climate change, as already mentioned, has a multitude of security impacts - rolling back the gains in nutrition and access to food; heightening the risk of wildfires and exacerbating air quality challenges; increasing the potential for water conflict; leading to more internal displacement and migration. It is increasingly regarded as a national security threat.”
8. Med shot, delegates
9. SOUNDBITE (English) Abdulla Shahid, Secretary for Foreign Affairs, Maldives:
“Climate change is destroying our tiny island country for years. It is eroding our beaches, killing the coral reefs protecting our islands, contaminating our fresh water with sea water, and we are losing our fish stock. But most importantly, climate change is going to take our home away from us.”
10. Med shot, delegates
11. Wide shot, Council

STORYLINE:

Addressing a Security Council open debate on the impact of climate-related disasters on international peace and security, Under-Secretary-General for Political and Peacebuilding Affairs, Rosemary Di Carlo, said “these trends represent a security risk for the entire world,” but “are felt most strongly in regions that are already vulnerable.”

Di Carlo told the Council climate change affects peace and security in indirect but serious ways. In the Sahel, competition for resources has fuelled tensions between herders and farmers; in the Lake Chad Basin drought has reduced economic opportunities and threatened the livelihoods of many who are turning to armed groups; and in Asia, studies have shown a link between the impact of climate change on livelihoods and the intensity of civil conflicts.

She noted that the Council “has recognized the adverse effects of climate change, among other factors, on the stability of Mali, Somalia, West Africa and the Sahel, Central Africa, and the Sudan.”

Di Carlo told the Council the UN is intensifying efforts to address climate-related security risks and is leveraging its partnerships with Member States and civil society to act with urgency on this collective problem.

She said, “the Secretary-General, for his part, has articulated a broad vision for prevention and made it a priority to improve our ability to address wider stresses and shocks that can exacerbate crises and lead to violent conflict.”

Di Carlo also pointed to climate-related displacement as an acute problem which drives up local tension as well as human trafficking and child exploitation.

Members of the Council also heard from the Chief Scientist of the World Meteorological Organization, Pavel Kabat.

Kabat said climate change “has a multitude of security impacts - rolling back the gains in nutrition and access to food; heightening the risk of wildfires and exacerbating air quality challenges; increasing the potential for water conflict; leading to more internal displacement and migration.”

He stressed that “it is increasingly regarded as a national security threat.”

In his address to the Council, the Secretary for Foreign Affairs of the Maldives, Abdulla Shahid, said
“climate change is destroying our tiny island country for years. It is eroding our beaches, killing the coral reefs protecting our islands, contaminating our fresh water with sea water, and we are losing our fish stock. But most importantly, climate change is going to take our home away from us.”

Climate change has long been considered a serious threat to low-lying islands like the Maldives, whose landmass is close to sea level.
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