DRC / EBOLA SURVIVORS

Preview Language:   Original
22-Jan-2019 00:02:30
As of 20 January, 422 people have died in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) Ebola outbreak, while 245 have survived. To support Ebola survivors, the Ministry of Health, the World Health Organization (WHO), and partners, have put in place a programme that covers three fields: clinical, biological, and psychosocial. WHO

Available Language: French
Type
Language
Format
Acquire
/
French
Other Formats
Description
STORY: DRC / EBOLA SURVIVORS
TRT: 02:30
SOURCE: WHO
RESTRICTIONS: PLEASE CREDIT WHO ON SCREEN
LANGUAGE: FRENCH / SWAHILI / NATS

DATELINE: 6 JANUARY 2019, BENI, DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF THE CONGO

SHOTLIST:

1. Various shots, Faustin Kalivanda, Ebola survivor, going through temperature check and disinfection before entering the hospital facility
2. SOUNDBITE (Swahili) Faustin Kalivanda, Ebola Survivor:
“I want to thank all the doctors in the Ebola treatment centre, all the hygienists, who kept the treatment room clean, the psychologists who gave us advice on the disease and psychological support to bring us back to life. And all others who are part of the response team, for helping us, for providing food. For all of that, I want to thank them.”
3. Various shots, Kalivanda sitting with Kainto Baoma Kinema, clinical psychologist, during their meeting
4. Various shots, Dr Mory Keita, WHO surveillance team leader, greeting health workers
5. SOUNDBITE (French) Mory Keita, Surveillance Team Leader, WHO:
“This program is fully supported by WHO, in implementing the follow-up of people cured of Ebola for a period of one year. WHO has already funded the renovation of three monitoring sites. A site in Beni, a site in Butembo, and one site in Mangina.”
6. Various shots, Kalivanda being examined by Dr Kakule Monjobo John, who oversees follow-up of survivors
7. SOUNDBITE (French) Kakule Monjobo John, Medical Doctor:
“Today on his second visit, the patient tells me that he is feeling well, there is no threat for his life in the future, that he will evolve very well, and that he is in good health.”
8. Pan left, Kalivanda leaving the Ebola treatment centre

STORYLINE:

As he does every month, Faustin Kalivanda, a father of four, returns to the Beni General Hospital for a check-up. But this isn’t a routine check-up. Kalivanda has survived Ebola and was under treatment at this very hospital until November. He lost his wife and their five-year-old daughter Ester to the disease.

He still remembers not only the disease but also the people who helped him recover.

Kalivanda said, “I want to thank all the doctors in the Ebola treatment centre, all the hygienists, who kept the treatment room clean, the psychologists who gave us advice on the disease and psychological support to bring us back to life. And all others who are part of the response team, for helping us, for providing food. For all that, I want to thank them.”

On 1 November, Kalivanda was discharged after he tested free of the virus. To support survivors like Kalivanda, the DRC Ministry of Health, WHO and partners have put in place a programme that covers three fields: clinical, biological, and psychosocial. The program was established in Beni in November, just as Kalivanda was released.

WHO’s surveillance team leader, Dr Mory Keita, said, “this program is fully supported by WHO, in implementing the follow-up of people cured of Ebola for a period of one year. I said that the WHO has already funded the renovation of three monitoring sites. A site in Beni, a site in Butembo, and one site in Mangina.”

Each survivor is provided with follow-up visits every month over a period of six months and then every three months for a year.

Dr Kakule Monjobo John, who oversees the follow-up of survivors, said, “today on his second visit, the patient tells me that he is feeling well, there is no threat for his life in the future, that he will evolve very well, and that he is in good health.”

As of 20 January, 422 people have died in this outbreak, while 245 have survived. Two hundred and seventeen of these survivors are participating in the programme. To support them, 46 staff have been trained on the medical, biological, and psychological follow-up of survivors.

Since his recovery, Kalivanda has decided to bring his experience to the service of other people infected with the virus. Now he works at the treatment centre himself as a nurse assistant, carrying patients from ambulances to the treatment centre and cleaning patient rooms. He believes that as a survivor he has a mission to help change the perception of Ebola in his community, by showing how survivors can contribute.
Series
Category
Topical Subjects
Creator
WHO
Alternate Title
unifeed190122c
Asset ID
2349056