UN / LIBYA

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18-Jan-2019 00:02:16
UN Special Representative in Libya Ghassan Salamé said the political deadlock in the country has been underpinned by a “complex web of narrow interests, a broken legal framework and the pillaging of Libya’s great wealth” adding that only Libyans themselves could plot a path “out of this malaise, towards stability and prosperity.” UNIFEED

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STORY: UN / LIBYA
TRT: 2:16
SOURCE: UNIFEED
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LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 18 JANUARY 2019, NEW YORK CITY

SHOTLIST:

FILE - NEW YORK CITY

1. Wide shot, UNHQ exterior

18 JANUARY 2019, NEW YORK CITY

2. Wide shot, Security Council
3. SOUNDBITE (English) Ghassan Salamé, Special Representative of the Secretary-General and Head of the United Nations Support Mission in Libya:
“Fighting in Derna is not over. Civilians have been killed in the conflict, families displaced and homes looted. Unconditional, unimpeded and sustained humanitarian access to the affected civilians in the old city is essential but denied. Civilians, including women and children have been arrested and held in detention facilities, without charge.”
4. Wide shot, Libyan ambassador
5. SOUNDBITE (English) Ghassan Salamé, Special Representative of the Secretary-General and Head of the United Nations Support Mission in Libya:
“The life of an SRSG is also one of a firefighter, and the fires are many that need to be extinguished. Clearly, this cannot be done from abroad, we must be here.”
6. Wide shot, Security Council
7. SOUNDBITE (English) Ghassan Salamé, Special Representative of the Secretary-General and Head of the United Nations Support Mission in Libya:
“We can fight fires, but eventually, there will be an inferno that cannot be extinguished. And so, we must go beyond, and tackle the underlying dysfunctionalities of the Libyan state. The political deadlock in Libya has been underpinned by a complex web of narrow interests, a broken legal framework and the pillaging of Libya’s great wealth. Only Libyans themselves can plot a path out of this malaise, towards stability and prosperity.”
8. Wide shot, Security Council
9. SOUNDBITE (English) Ghassan Salamé, Special Representative of the Secretary-General and Head of the United Nations Support Mission in Libya:
“I beseech the members of the various Libyan institutions to see the National Conference as a patriotic concern that transcends partisan and personal interests. To embrace it as a means to be the leaders this great country needs.”
10. Wide shot, Security Council
11. SOUNDBITE (English) Ghassan Salamé, Special Representative of the Secretary-General and Head of the United Nations Support Mission in Libya:
“Without the concerted support of the international community, spoilers will sabotage the political process and undo any progress made. If this were to be allowed, Libya’s progress will be set back years and almost certainly open the door to those who believe there is only a martial solution to Libya’s woes.”
12. Wide shot, Security Council

STORYLINE:

UN Special Representative in Libya Ghassan Salamé said the political deadlock in the country has been underpinned by a “complex web of narrow interests, a broken legal framework and the pillaging of Libya’s great wealth” adding that only Libyans themselves could plot a path “out of this malaise, towards stability and prosperity.”

Addressing the Security Council today (18 Jan) via teleconference from the Libyan capital Tripoli, Salamé said the South, which is the source of much of the country’s natural wealth, had been neglected as the conditions there deteriorate at an alarming rate despite years of promises to address the situation. He said agencies would continue to carry out their work to help the region but added that it was the Libyan authorities who must shoulder the burden.

The Special Representative said fighting in the eastern city of Derna was not over. He added, “Civilians have been killed in the conflict, families displaced and homes looted. Unconditional, unimpeded and sustained humanitarian access to the affected civilians in the old city is essential but denied. Civilians, including women and children have been arrested and held in detention facilities, without charge.”

However, Salamé pointed to some progress to stabilize the country in the last few months. He said changes to the cabinet had improved the UN’s scope to support service delivery and reform and the ceasefire negotiated between the major armed actors in September remained in place. He added that the economy continued to stabilize as inflation had steadied and commodity prices had dropped substantially.

Salamé told the Council that the UN Mission (UNSMIL) had returned to Libya in full force and expected to re-open the Mission’s office in Benghazi at the end of this month. He stressed the importance for UNSMIL to be in Libya adding that the life of a Special Representative is “also one of a firefighter, and the fires are many that need to be extinguished; clearly, this cannot be done from abroad, we must be here.”

The Special Representative warned that while fires could be fought, “eventually there will be an inferno that cannot be extinguished.” He added, “We must go beyond, and tackle the underlying dysfunctionalities of the Libyan state.”

Salamé highlighted the importance that the expected National Conference be held under the right conditions. He said once the essential elements for a new consensus on a national agenda to rebuild a capable and united Libyan civil state have been agreed upon by the major players, he would be ready to state the exact date and venue of the Conference. He added, “I beseech the members of the various Libyan institutions to see the National Conference as a patriotic concern that transcends partisan and personal interests. To embrace it as a means to be the leaders this great country needs.”

The Special Representative said without the concerted support of the international community, “spoilers will sabotage the political process and undo any progress made; if this were to be allowed, Libya’s progress will be set back years and almost certainly open the door to those who believe there is only a martial solution to Libya’s woes.”
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