SOUTH SUDAN / MOBILE COURT RAPE CASES

Preview Language:   Original
14-Dec-2018 00:03:34
A United Nations-supported mobile court has begun hearing cases in the town of Bentiu in South Sudan’s remote north, bringing legal justice back to the town for the first time in more than four years. UNMISS

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STORY: SOUTH SUDAN / MOBILE COURT RAPE CASES
TRT: 3:34
SOURCE: UNMISS
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
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DATELINE: 11 DECEMBER 2018, BENTIU, SOUTH SUDAN

SHOTLIST:

11 DECEMBER 2018, BENTIU, SOUTH SUDAN

1. Wide shot, convoy of trooper vehicles
2. Wide shot, vehicles arriving at court
3. Various shots, peacekeepers bringing suspect into court
4. Close up, handcuffs being removed
5. Various shots, inside court
6. SOUNDBITE (Arabic) Peter Mazen, Senior Judge, Juba and Bentiu Mobile Court:
“We are working for justice so that the accused can be tried fast. They should either be charged or released if they didn’t commit a crime. They should be in jail only if they did something wrong. One is not supposed to be held without trial. This means there is delay in justice. But now, with the presence of lawyers, here to defend what law demands, it is something good and it encourages me to go ahead because the lawyers are here for the accused.”
7. Various shots, peacekeepers protecting court
8. Close up, mobile court register
9. SOUNDBITE (Arabic) Peter Mazen, Senior Judge, Juba and Bentiu Mobile Court:
“There are places, including Bentiu, where the administration could not bring in a judge to work because there isn’t even a place to stay. There is no court. There isn’t equipment for a court or even. There is no police to work in the court. So, all this prevented the administration from trying to establish the old courts, including Bentiu court, and bring judges for them.”
10. Various shots, court proceeding
11. SOUNDBITE (Arabic) Peter Mazen, Senior Judge, Juba and Bentiu Mobile Court:
“We have started this mobile court with everything provided and nothing missing. Our security has is good and the halls are provided. All the capacities of all sides are available. The accused and their defence are ready; and the plaintiffs and their witnesses are ready. So, we are being encouraged with all this, to work until late on the first day.”
12. Wide shot, witnesses seated outside
13. Med shot, peacekeeper on guard

STORYLINE:

A United Nations-supported mobile court has begun hearing cases in the town of Bentiu in South Sudan’s remote north, bringing legal justice back to the town for the first time in more than four years.

The court heard one murder and two rape cases marking the beginning of legal proceedings that will see 27 suspects go on trial in a period of two weeks, with some having waited a whole year for their day in court.

The mobile court comprises two judges, two prosecutors, one investigator and two defense counsels, and will operate from United Nations Protection of Civilians sites (PoCs).

SOUNDBITE (Arabic) Peter Mazen, Senior Judge, Juba and Bentiu Mobile Court:
“We are working for justice so that the accused can be tried fast. They should either be charged or released if they didn’t commit a crime. They should be in jail only if they did something wrong. One is not supposed to be held without trial. This means there is delay in justice. But now, with the presence of lawyers, here to defend what law demands, it is something good and it encourages me to go ahead because the lawyers are here for the accused.”

The UN mission in South Sudan (UNMISS) helped in refurbishing the courthouse within its existing resources and now, at the directive of the country’s Chief Justice, the court has been set up to try serious crimes committed inside and outside the Mission’s protections sites.

A senior legal officer from UNMISS’ Rule of Law Section, Anees Ahmed, says there has been delayed justice, or a complete absence of justice for the last four years, because of the war in South Sudan. His office works to protect civilians by ensuring justice and rule of law. Judge Mazen said the capacity of the judicial system in the country is minimal. He explained why justice has been delayed here in Bentiu.

SOUNDBITE (Arabic) Peter Mazen, Senior Judge, Juba and Bentiu Mobile Court:
“There are places, including Bentiu, where the administration could not bring in a judge to work because there isn’t even a place to stay. There is no court. There isn’t equipment for a court or even. There is no police to work in the court. So, all this prevented the administration from trying to establish the old courts, including Bentiu court, and bring judges for them.”

The team of mobile High Court officials began their work at the partly run-down building just after 8 a.m., immediately settling down to their business of the day: studying files for cases they had scheduled to start on Tuesday afternoon.

SOUNDBITE (Arabic) Peter Mazen, Senior Judge, Juba and Bentiu Mobile Court:
“We have started this mobile court with everything provided and nothing missing. Our security has is good and the halls are provided. All the capacities of all sides are available. The accused and their defence are ready; and the plaintiffs and their witnesses are ready. So, we are being encouraged with all this, to work until late on the first day.”
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unifeed181214e
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2333652