MARRAKESH / GLOBAL COMPACT FOR MIGRATION

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11-Dec-2018 00:03:21
After more than 160 world governments unanimously adopted a historic global framework to manage international migration in a safer and more dignified way, the Secretary-General’s Special Representative for International Migration, Louise Arbour, said that “rather than ignore the impetus of some to relocate, or worse, to attempt to crush it at unconscionable cost, we are now committed to safer and fairer ways of managing borders.” UN VIDEO

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STORY: MARRAKESH / GLOBAL COMPACT FOR MIGRATION CLOSING
TRT: 03:21
SOURCE: UN VIDEO
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / FRENCH / NATS

DATELINE: 11 DECEMBER 2018, MARRAKESH, MOROCCO

SHOTLIST:

1. Wide shot, Marrakech city street
2. Wide shot, man walks past cactus garden
3. Wide shot, plenary hall
4. SOUNDBITE (English) Louise Arbour, Special Representative of the United Nations Secretary-General for International Migration:
“There is probably no principle more fundamental in the organization of international affairs than the geographic allocation of space on this planet, confirmed by the universal recognition of state sovereignty. And yet, the drawings of lines on maps have never sufficed to confine people whose needs, ambitions, dreams and opportunities expanded their horizons. Rather than ignore the impetus of some to relocate, or worse, to attempt to crush it at unconscionable cost, we are now committed to safer and fairer ways of managing borders.”
5. Various shots, plenary hall, people clapping
6. SOUNDBITE (French) Nasser Bourita, Minister of Foreign Affairs and International Cooperation, Morocco:
“I now declare closed the Intergovernmental Conference to Adopt the Global Compact for Safe, Orderly and Regular Migration.”
7. Meds hot, audience clapping
8. Various shots, Arbour and Bourita embrace
9. Pan right, conference site plaza
10. SOUNDBITE (English) Ellen Sirleaf Johnson, Chairperson for the High-Level panel for International Migration in Africa and former President of Liberia:
“It’s that resistance to all of what was called the migrant crisis, and all the different activities that took place in the last year or so. That resistance I think will move away, when they read the reports of the true story of migration, and the fact that it benefits, it does not harm countries. Neither the origin countries, nor the host countries. And I think once they see the record, and they see the statistics, and they see the studies, and they see the benefits, that they too will change their minds and they will join in this movement that is really in the interest of humankind.”
11. Wide shot, people walking on plaza
12. SOUNDBITE (English) Tarek Yousef, Director of the Brookings Doha Center:
“Financial inclusion of migrants happens to be an important area of interest and focus. It is precisely the technology developers working with startups in the financial services industry, and with other more established companies, that are now offering solutions for migrants to become more integrated in the financial system. To access banking accounts. To be able to save. And more importantly from the perspective of sending countries to be able to also transmit remittances at lower cost and to do this efficiently. And to do it without all the traditional bureaucratic procedures, which either migrants are frightened by, or don’t have access to. So, to the extent that the private sector is leading with innovations in the space of technology, they are already playing a bigger role and they should be encouraged and incentivized to do even more.”
13. Wide shot, fountain and tent at sunset

STORYLINE:

After more than 160 world governments unanimously adopted a historic global framework to manage international migration in a safer and more dignified way, the Secretary-General’s Special Representative for International Migration, Louise Arbour, said that “rather than ignore the impetus of some to relocate, or worse, to attempt to crush it at unconscionable cost, we are now committed to safer and fairer ways of managing borders.”

Countering arguments that the Compact infringes on the principle of nation sovereignty, Arbour said, “there is probably no principle more fundamental in the organization of international affairs than the geographic allocation of space on this planet, confirmed by the universal recognition of state sovereignty. And yet, the drawings of lines on maps have never sufficed to confine people whose needs, ambitions, dreams and opportunities expanded their horizons.”

Commenting on the adoption of the Compact, former Liberian president Ellen Johnson Sirleaf said, “it’s that resistance to all of what was called the migrant crisis, and all the different activities that took place in the last year or so. That resistance I think will move away, when they read the reports of the true story of migration, and the fact that it benefits, it does not harm countries. Neither the origin countries, nor the host countries. And I think once they see the record, and they see the statistics, and they see the studies, and they see the benefits, that they too will change their minds and they will join in this movement that is really in the interest of humankind.”

The director of Brookings Doha Center, Tarek Yousef, highlighted the role of technological innovation in making promising solutions effective and widespread.

He said, “financial inclusion of migrants happens to be an important area of interest and focus. It is precisely the technology developers working with startups in the financial services industry, and with other more established companies, that are now offering solutions for migrants to become more integrated in the financial system. To access banking accounts. To be able to save. And more importantly from the perspective of sending countries to be able to also transmit remittances at lower cost and to do this efficiently. And to do it without all the traditional bureaucratic procedures, which either migrants are frightened by, or don’t have access to. So, to the extent that the private sector is leading with innovations in the space of technology, they are already playing a bigger role and they should be encouraged and incentivized to do even more.”

More than 2,000 attended the Intergovernmental Conference on the Global Compact for Migration, including government officials, representatives of business, labour unions, civil society, mayors and many others who have a vital role to play in ensuring that migration is managed in a manner that brings benefits for all.
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