WHO / ROAD SAFETY REPORT

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06-Dec-2018 00:02:38
A new report by the World Health Organization (WHO) indicates road traffic deaths continue to rise, with an annual 1.35 million fatalities. WHO

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STORY: WHO / ROAD SAFETY REPORT
TRT: 2:38
SOURCE: WHO /FILE
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH /NATS

DATELINE: 6 DECEMBER 2018, GENEVA, SWITZERLAND /FILE

SHOTLIST:

FILE – 2009, VIETNAM

1. Tracking shot, four people riding on one scooter in traffic
2. Various shots, congested traffic

FILE – JUNE 22016, KINSHASA, DR CONGO

3. Tracking shot, people running over congested streets

6 DECEMBER 2018, GENEVA, SWITZERLAND

4. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Etienne Krug, Director, Department for Management of Noncommunicable Diseases, Disability, Violence and Injury Prevention:
“The number should be going down because governments have committed to a 50% reduction over five years of road traffic deaths and instead we're seeing a slight increase still, because we're not taking the necessary measures.”

FILE – DATE, LOCATION UNKNOWN

5. Various shots, women and children crossing busy streets

6 DECEMBER 2018, GENEVA, SWITZERLAND

6. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Etienne Krug, Director, Department for Management of Noncommunicable Diseases, Disability, Violence and Injury Prevention:
“What's particularly shocking is that road traffic crashes have become the leading cause of death for young people. We already knew it was a leading cause of death for the 15 to 29 year olds. Now, it's also the leading cause of that for the five to fourteen year old. These are young children, going to school, going out to play and getting killed because there's no sidewalk, because there's no safe playground, because basically governments haven't put in place the infrastructure to allow them to do so safely.”

FILE – DATE, LOCATION UNKNOWN

7. Med shot, little girl crossing a busy street

6 DECEMBER 2018, GENEVA, SWITZERLAND

8. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Etienne Krug, Director, Department for Management of Noncommunicable Diseases, Disability, Violence and Injury Prevention:
“We know what needs to be done. Good legislation on key risk factors such as drink driving, speeding, wearing seatbelts or motorcycle helmets and making sure this legislation is enforced. Appropriate infrastructure, so many new roads are still being built without sidewalks for kids to walk, or bicycle lanes, or even safe lanes for motorcyclists. And making sure vehicles are safe airbags, seatbelts, electronic stability control, these are all relatively cheap features that make vehicles much safer.”

FILE – DATE, LOCATION UNKNOWN

9. Various shots, bicycle lanes

6 DECEMBER 2018, GENEVA, SWITZERLAND

10. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Etienne Krug, Director, Department for Management of Noncommunicable Diseases, Disability, Violence and Injury Prevention:
“Some countries like Sweden, the Netherlands, and others have managed to dramatically decrease their numbers and rates of road traffic deaths by implementing a series of well-known interventions. Their rates are now 10 times lower than in those countries where it's not happening.”

FILE – DATE, LOCATION UNKNOWN

11. Various shots, organized traffic

STORYLINE:

A new report by the World Health Organization (WHO) indicates road traffic deaths continue to rise, with an annual 1.35 million fatalities.

The WHO Global status report on road safety 2018 highlights that road traffic injuries are now the leading killer of children and young people aged 5-29 years.

The WHO Global status report on road safety 2018 documents that despite an increase in the overall number of deaths, the rates of death relative to the size of the world population have stabilized in recent years. This suggests that existing road safety efforts in some middle- and high-income countries have mitigated the situation.

In the settings where progress has been made, it is largely attributed to better legislation around key risks such as speeding, drinking and driving, and failing to use seat-belts, motorcycle helmets and child restraints; safer infrastructure like sidewalks and dedicated lanes for cyclists and motorcyclists; improved vehicle standards such as those that mandate electronic stability control and advanced braking; and enhanced post-crash care.

The report documents that these measures have contributed to reductions in road traffic deaths in 48 middle- and high-income countries. However, not a single low-income country has demonstrated a reduction in overall deaths, in large part because these measures are lacking.

In fact, the risk of a road traffic death remains three times higher in low-income countries than in high-income countries. The rates are highest in Africa (26.6 per 100 000 population) and lowest in Europe (9.3 per 100 000 population). On the other hand, since the previous edition of the report, three regions of the world have reported a decline in road traffic death rates: Americas, Europe and the Western Pacific.

Variations in road traffic deaths are also reflected by type of road user. Globally, pedestrians and cyclists account for 26% of all road traffic deaths, with that figure as high as 44% in Africa and 36% in the Eastern Mediterranean. Motorcycle riders and passengers account for 28% of all road traffic deaths, but the proportion is higher in some regions, e.g. 43% in South-East Asia and 36% in the Western Pacific.

WHO’s global status reports on road safety are released every two to three years, and serve as the key monitoring tool for the Decade of Action for Road Safety 2011-2020.

Compared to the previous report in the series released in 2015, other findings from the Global status report on road safety 2018 include:
• 22 additional countries amended their laws on one or more risk factors to bring them in line with best practice, covering an additional 1 billion people;
• 46 countries representing 3 billion people have laws setting speed limits that align with best practice;
• 45 countries representing 2.3 billion people currently have drink-driving laws that align with best practice;
• 49 countries representing 2.7 billion people, currently have laws on motorcycle helmet use that align with best practice;
• 105 countries representing 5.3 billion people, currently have laws on seat-belt use that align with best practice;
• 33 countries representing 652 million people, currently have laws on the use of child restraint systems that align with best practice;
• 114 countries currently undertake some systematic assessment or star rating of existing roads;
• Only 40 countries representing 1 billion people, have implemented at least 7 or all of the 8 priority UN vehicle safety standards;
• More than half of countries (62%) have a telephone number with full country coverage to activate the emergency care system;
• 55% of countries have a formal process to train and certify pre-hospital care providers.

The Global Status Report on Road Safety was funded by Bloomberg Philanthropies.
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WHO
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