ILO / GLOBAL WAGE GROWTH REPORT

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26-Nov-2018 00:02:09
Global wage growth in 2017 fell to its lowest rate since 2008, far below levels before the global financial crisis, according to a new International Labour Organization (ILO) report. ILO

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STORY: ILO / GLOBAL WAGE GROWTH REPORT
TRT: 2:09
SOURCE: ILO
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH /NATS

DATELINE: 26 NOVEMBER 2018, GENEVA, SWITZERLAND

SHOTLIST:

1. Pan right, press room
2. SOUNDBITE (English) Guy Ryder, Director-General, International Labour Organization:
“We believe that we are in our report taking a more sophisticated, and more accurate measure of the gender pay gap. The average figure we come up with is that women continue to be paid about 20 per cent less than men for work of equal value around the world.”
3. Close up, reporter
4. SOUNDBITE (English) Guy Ryder, Director-General, International Labour Organization:
“In high income countries the gender pay gap tends to be higher among top income earners, reflecting to some extent, I think, the phenomenon of the glass ceiling, whereas in emerging and developing countries the gap tends to be much greater at the bottom end of the wage scale.”
5. Med shot, reporter typing
6. SOUNDBITE (English) Guy Ryder, Director-General, International Labour Organization:
“It’s interesting I think to note and worrying as well that there is very clear motherhood penalty for women. The gender pay gap is increased when women have children, young children and contrary to that, it’s almost a mirror image there’s actually a fatherhood premium on wages, that is to say men with young children actually do better than their counterparts without children.”
7. Med shot, reporters
8. SOUNDBITE (English) Guy Ryder, Director-General, International Labour Organization:
“Wages continue to lag behind productivity so the share of wealth and share of richness in our countries is going away from working people. And that inevitably has an impact on demand in our economy. So when people don't have money in their pocket to spend, I think there is a real danger that our economies grow more slowly. People can't find investment opportunities and enterprises suffer as well. So this is not good news and we hope that we can find ways of bringing about improvements.”
9. Close up, report

STORYLINE:

Global wage growth in 2017 fell to its lowest rate since 2008, far below levels before the global financial crisis, according to a new International Labour Organization (ILO) report. The Global Wage Report 2018/19 found that in real terms - adjusted for price inflation, global wage growth declined to 1.8 per cent in 2017 from 2.4 per cent in 2016. The findings are based on data from 136 countries.

The director-general of the International Labour Organization Guy Ryder told reporters in Geneva today that “women continue to be paid about 20 per cent less than men for work of equal value around the world” and that “In high income countries the gender pay gap tends to be higher among top income earners, reflecting to some extent, I think, the phenomenon of the glass ceiling, whereas in emerging and developing countries the gap tends to be much greater at the bottom end of the wage scale.”

Using empirical evidence, the report also shows that traditional explanations, such as differences in the levels of education between men and women who work in paid employment, play a limited role in explaining gender pay gaps.

Another factor which weighs on the gender wage gap is motherhood. The report shows that mothers tend to have lower wages compared to non-mothers. This may be related to a host of factors, including labour market interruptions, reductions in working time, employment in more family-friendly jobs with lower wages, or stereotypical promotion decisions at enterprise level.

According to the report, a more equitable sharing of family duties between men and women would in many instances lead to women making different occupational choices.

Surprisingly, the evidence shows that even before women reach motherhood, there is already a pay gap. This suggests a need to combat stereotypes and discrimination at the point of entry into the labour market.
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