MALI / GUINEAN PEACEKEEPERS

Preview Language:   Original
12-Nov-2018 00:02:08
Every morning at dawn break, Guinean peacekeepers climb into two armored personnel carriers (APC), that would rumble out the UN base soon, to carry out a dangerous task of “search and detect” explosive devices buried in the sandy roads in and around Kidal, northern Mali. MINUSMA

Available Language: French
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Description
STORY: MALI / GUINEAN PEACEKEEPERS
TRT: 2:08
SOURCE: MINUSMA
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: FRENCH / NATS

DATELINE: NOVEMBER 2018, KIDAL, MALI

SHOTLIST:

1 Wide shot, sunrise over Guinean camp
2. Various shots, Guinean blue helmets getting ready for early morning patrol
3. Pan right, Guinean peacekeepers carrying “search and detect” equipment
4. Med shot, Guinean soldiers getting into armored vehicle
5. Med shot, soldiers inside armored vehicle
6. Pan left, armored ambulance passing by on sandy road
7. Wide shot, Guinean peacekeepers getting out of APC
7. Various shots, “search and detect” equipment assembly
8. SOUNDBITE (French) Sgt Mamady Keita, Guinean Blue Helmet:
“It is too sandy, so it is easy for an insurgent to put something [bomb] inside, without leaving trace. So, to avoid the risk, we are checking the road to make sure there is nothing hidden under it.”
9. Various shots, Guinean soldiers on foot searching for explosive devices
10. SOUNDBITE (French) Sgt Mamady Keita, Guinean Blue Helmet:
“We, “The Search&Detect Team” have a very important, crucial task in the implementation of the mission’s mandate. In other words, if we don’t go out to assess and clean the roads from explosive devices, not one United Nations vehicle, including military ones, could go out here, in Kidal.”
11. Tracking shot, soldier with Guinee sign walking

STORYLINE:

Every morning at dawn break, Guinean peacekeepers climb into two armored personnel carriers (APC), that would rumble out the UN base soon, to carry out a dangerous task of “search and detect” explosive devices buried in the sandy roads in and around Kidal, northern Mali.

The threat of landmines is always present in the restive northern Mali, where lack of infrastructure means that most of the roads are no more but tracks in sand making it easy for insurgents from numerous armed groups to plant a landmine and erase all giveaway signs that would otherwise warn the incoming vehicles of danger.

The so-called search and detect team from the Guinean peacekeeping contingent, on foot, carefully comb the sand for explosive devices and hiding places for landmines.

SOUNDBITE (French) Sgt Mamady Keita, Guinean Blue Helmet:
“It is too sandy, so it is easy for an insurgent to put something [bomb] inside, without leaving trace. So, to avoid the risk, we are checking the road to make sure there is nothing hidden under it.”

All Guinean soldiers, like all military personnel joining the United Nations peacekeeping mission in Mali, known under its French acronym MINUSMA, have to go through intense in-country pre-deployment training on explosive threats and risks. These pre-deployment trainings are meant to better equip the Blue helmets with skills to protect themselves, help them protect others and improve resilience and safety for the delivery of the MINUSMA’s mandate.

The search&detect team from Guinea has also an added task in making sure roads are safe for others to use.

SOUNDBITE (French) Sgt Mamady Keita, Guinean Blue Helmet:
“We, “The Search&Detect Team” have a very important, crucial task in the implementation of the mission’s mandate. In other words, if we don’t go out to assess and clean the roads from explosive devices, not one United Nations vehicle, including military ones, could go out here, in Kidal.”

The job comes with daily challenges. This morning patrol was uneventful, and the Blue helmets returned safe and sound to the base. But the next day, a UN vehicle run over a mine. Fourteen peacekeepers were injured.

Almost 850 peacekeepers from Guinea are serving in Mali, which is one of the largest contributing countries to MINUSMA. Since 2013, MINUSMA has recorded 600 improvised explosive devices (IEDs), which have caused nearly 1,500 casualties.

Established in 2013, MINUSMA supports the inter-Malian peace agreement by helping to restore the State authority, advance diplomacy, strengthen security and promote human rights.
Series
Category
Geographic Subjects
Creator
MINUSMA
Alternate Title
unifeed181112a
Asset ID
2307086