DRC / EBOLA THERAPEUTICS DRUGS

Preview Language:   Original
04-Oct-2018 00:02:43
For the first time in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), new therapeutic drugs are part of the Ebola response. Five investigational therapeutics have been approved for use, and four have been used so far. As of 1 October, 47 patients have been provided with the therapeutics. Patients are now receiving them within hours of Ebola confirmation. WHO

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STORY: DRC / EBOLA THERAPEUTICS DRUGS
TRT: 2:46
SOURCE: WHO
RESTRICTION: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / FRENCH /NATS

DATELINE: 27 AUGUST 2018, BENI, DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF THE CONGO

SHOTLIST:

1. Various shots, traffic in Beni
2. Various shots, health workers at ALIMA (the Alliance for International Medical Action) Ebola Treatment Centre (ETC), one of the facilities where the new therapeutics are being administered
3. Various shots, new therapeutics
4. SOUNDBITE (English) William Fischer, Case Management Coordinator, World Health Organization (WHO):
“I would say that there is a mix of emotions when you go into an And it gives me an incredible amount of hope. Ebola treatment unit and deliver one of these therapeutics. On one hand, you are incredibly nervous because not many people were given these drugs before and not many people have received them. But on the other hand, there is a sense of excitement and hope because for the first time we have something to use to directly fight against the virus.”
5. Various shots, a treatment unit where the therapeutics are administered with a patient inside
6. SOUNDBITE (English) William Fischer, Case Management Coordinator, World Health Organization (WHO):
“I also think the important thing is that we are actually improving access to the same care regardless where you are. Whether you are in a research-rich area or resource-limited area. And for me this equal access to care is a critical issue.”
7. Various shots, ALIMA Ebola Treatment Centre
8. SOUNDBITE (English) William Fischer, Case Management Coordinator, World Health Organization (WHO):
“I think this really represents a paradigm shift in our treatment approach to Ebola virus disease. It really represents this next step after more aggressive, supportive care. Now we have the opportunity to give these therapeutics that potentially could act against the virus. For me this really represents a monumental step forward in terms of what we have available. to patients with this disease.”
9. Various shots, health workers at the Ebola treatment centre
10. UPSOUNDBITE (French) Richard Kojan, President, Alliance for International Medical Action (ALIMA):
“In particular I am happy that the therapeutics are finally available for the Congolese people, even for those living far away from the capital, that the molecules are available so that we as doctors are able to administer them to the patients.”
11. Various shots, health workers administering the therapeutics to a patient

STORYLINE:

For the first time in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), new therapeutic drugs are part of the Ebola response. Five investigational therapeutics have been approved for use, and four have been used so far. As of 1 October, 47 patients have been provided with the therapeutics. Patients are now receiving them within hours of Ebola confirmation.

William Fischer, Case Management Coordinator from the World Health Organization (WHO) said “I think this really represents a paradigm shift in our treatment approach to Ebola virus disease. It really represents this next step after more aggressive, supportive care. Now we have the opportunity to give these therapeutics that potentially could act against the virus. For me this really represents a monumental step forward in terms of what we have available. to patients with this disease.”

Fischer added “I would say that there is a mix of emotions when you go to Ebola treatment unit and deliver one of these therapeutics. On one hand, you are incredibly nervous because not many people were given these drugs before and not many people have received them. But on the other hand, there is a sense of excitement and hope because for the first time we have something to use to directly fight against the virus.”

Richard Kojan, the President of the Alliance for International Medical Action (ALIMA) said “in particular I am happy that the therapeutics are finally available for the Congolese people, even for those living far away from the capital, that the molecules are available so that we as doctors are able to administer them to the patients.”

Treatments are administered under a compassionate use framework known as the Monitored Emergency Use of Unregistered and Investigational Interventions (MEURI). WHO clinicians are involved on the ground in helping determine best treatment depending on clinical criteria, complexity of administration and monitoring capacities.

There are parallel efforts underway to establish clinical trials for the treatments as soon as possible.
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WHO
Alternate Title
unifeed181004e
Asset ID
2255546