UNOOSA / INTERNATIONAL SPACE STATION

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20-Jun-2018 00:02:59
Calling from the International Space Station (ISS) via videolink into an event on space taking place in Vienna today, Commander Drew Feustel said that the goal for space exploration should not necessarily be to dominate it, but to help facilitate access so that humankind as a species, can continue on the path to the future. UNIFEED

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STORY: UN / INTERNATIONAL SPACE STATION
TRT: 02:59
SOURCE: UNIFEED
RESTRICTION: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 20 JUNE 2018, VIENNA, AUSTRIA

SHOTLIST:

1. Exterior, Vienna International Centre
2. Various shots, conference room
3. SOUNDBITE (English) Commander Drew Feustel, Astronaut, National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA):
“I hope as we continuing forward as an international group that we all put the common thoughts and rational thoughts to prevail, in the way that we utilize space and really recognize that the goal should not necessarily to be dominate space but actually to help facilitate access so that we as a species, not just an individual nation and individual species as people, but we as species to continue on path to the future to come.”
4.Wide shot, conference room
5. SOUNDBITE (English) Alexander Gerst, Astronaut and Geophysicist, European Space Agency (ESA)
“In the future if we want to be successful in space, we need to partner up, we need to cooperate, so for the new countries that are coming in, that means partnering up with the countries that are having more experience already, and build something on top of that. We have this fantastic international cooperation that built the International Space Station, and it is our duty to use it for future projects.”
6. Wide shot, conference room
7. SOUNDBITE (English) Serena Auñón-Chancellor, Astronaut, National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA):
“What I tell young girls and young women is to bother. Bother people if you are interested in their work, bother them if you are interested in their research. Get them to tell you about it, ask questions. If you are too much of a bother, they will tell you to go away, but until then, ask, explore, discover and that’s the best way, I think for young girls and women to become more interested in the STEM field. Don’t be afraid, step up, ask and bother.”
8. Wide shot, conference room
9. SOUNDBITE (English) Ricky Arnold, Astronaut, National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA):
“The day to day work we do here is twofold. And it focuses on improving life on earth, and trying to understand how our planet functions, human health and developing medicines and tools to deal with diagnostic challenges we have in medicine, to preparing and laying the groundwork for what happens to humans.”
10. Med shot, audience
11.SOUNDBITE (English) Ricky Arnold, Astronaut, National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA):
“I think that the six of us together up here with thousands of the people all over the world, the overall arching idea here is that we have found a higher plane of agreement and people from different cultures and different backgrounds and different languages have come together and have shown that we are capable of remarkable things as species. And the international space station a proof of that.”
12.Wide shot, audience
13.Wide shot, International Space Station

STORYLINE:

Calling from the International Space Station (ISS) via videolink into an event on space taking place in Vienna today, Commander Drew Feustel said that the goal for space exploration should not necessarily be to dominate it, but to help facilitate access so that humankind as a species, can continue on the path to the future.

As part of UNISPACE+50 events in Vienna, Director of the United Nations Office of Outer Space Affairs (UNOOSA) Simonetta Di Pippo, together with the UN Champion for Space Scott Kelly and NASA’s Chief Scientist Jim Green, conducted a video call with the ISS Expedition Crew 56.

On her first flight to space, NASA Astronaut Serena Auñón-Chancellor encouraged young girls and women who are interested in STEM field to ask, explore, and discover.

She said “what I tell young girls and young women is to bother. Bother people if you are interested in their work, bother them if you are interested in their research. Get them to tell you about it, ask questions. If you are too much of a bother, they will tell you to go away.”

Asked about how countries who are newer users of space can engage in ISS research and educational activities, European Space Agency’s (ESA) astronaut and geophysicist Alexander Gerst said “in the future if we want to be successful in space, we need to partner up, we need to cooperate. So for the new countries that are coming in, that means partnering up with the countries that are having more experience already, and build something on top of that. “

Gerst added “we have this fantastic international cooperation that built the International Space Station, and it is our duty to use it for future projects.”

Asked about how the work on the ISS improves the daily lives of people on Earth, NASA’s astronaut Ricky Arnold said “The day to day work we do here is twofold. And it focuses on improving life on earth, and trying to understand how our planet functions, human health and developing medicines and tools to deal with diagnostic challenges we have in medicine, to preparing and laying the groundwork for what happens to humans.”

Arnold continued “the six of us together up here with thousands of the people all over the world, the overall arching idea here is that we have found a higher plane of agreement and people from different cultures and different backgrounds and different languages have come together and have shown that we are capable of remarkable things as species. And the international space station a proof of that.”

Several research studies are being conducted on Expedition 56. One is to test navigation tools aboard the ISS for emergency navigation on missions in deep space as humans begin to travel farther from Earth, in case of communications and main computers being compromised. Other researches include Identifying microbes aboard the ISS and studying Ultra-Cold Atoms.

The crews on board are Commander Drew Feustel (NASA), Latvian astronaut Oleg Artemyev (ROSCOSMOS), Ricky Arnold (NASA), Serena Auñón-Chancellor (NASA), Russian astronaut Sergey Prokopyev and Alexander Gerst (ESA).
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