UN / INTERNATIONAL LAW

Preview Language:   Original
ENGLISH 17-May-2018 00:02:46
Polish President Andrzej Duda said the international community could not deal with its security challenges if it does not invest in the very foundation of global order, the respect for international law. UNIFEED
Type
Language
Format
Acquire
Original
HD PAL
Original
SD PAL
Original
HD NTSC
/
English
Other Formats
Description
STORY: UN / INTERNATIONAL LAW
TRT: 02:46
SOURCE: UNIFEED
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 17 MAY 2018, NEW YORK CITY

SHOTLIST:

FILE - NEW YORK CITY

1. Wide shot, UNHQ exterior

17 MAY 2018, NEW YORK CITY

2. Wide shot, Security Council
3. SOUNDBITE (English) Andrzej Duda, President, Republic of Poland:
“Impunity of those responsible for chemical attacks in Syria is not only contrary to international law. It also undermines the peace process and our common security. Therefore, we fully support the establishment of an independent impartial and professional mechanism to attribute responsibility for the use of chemical weapons. Any such crime must be properly investigated, and those responsible held accountable. Those crimes should never happen again.”
4. Wide shot, Polish President in Security Council Chamber
5. SOUNDBITE (English) Andrzej Duda, President, Republic of Poland:
“Poland supports the idea of deploying UN peacekeeping operation in Eastern Ukraine. The mandate of such operation should not be limited to the protection of the OSCE Special Monitoring Mission, but should cover the whole area of the conflict, including the entire Ukrainian-Russian internationally recognized border. The international community should not lose its focus on the ongoing desperate plight of the Crimean Tatars and human rights activists in the occupied Crimea, who are subject to constant intimidation.”
6. Wide shot, Security Council
7. SOUNDBITE (English) Stef Blok, Minister of Foreign Affairs, Kingdom of the Netherlands:
“The situation in Syria has been a stark reminder of a deep crisis. A protection crisis. A crisis of respect for the hard-won gains in international law we fought for since the end of the First World War. From the Geneva Conventions, to the Charter of the UN, to the Chemical Weapons Convention - in Syria, all of these norms were trampled.”
8. Pan right, Security Council
9. SOUNDBITE (English) Theodor Meron, President of the International Residual Mechanism for Criminal Tribunals:
“In action and outright intransigence risk – let me be quite clear about it - undermining accountability gains in quite a verity of fora. If efforts to ensure accountability for violations of international law are to succeed in the long run, this Council, its Members, and the international community more generally must continue to actively engage with and sustain them.”
10. Wide shot, Security Council

STORYLINE:

Polish President Andrzej Duda said the international community could not deal with its security challenges if it does not invest in the very foundation of global order, the respect for international law.

Addressing the Security Council today (17 May), Duda said all actors in Syria must be called upon to take actions to prevent the use of weapons of mass destruction, including chemical weapons. He added, “Impunity of those responsible for chemical attacks in Syria is not only contrary to international law; it also undermines the peace process and our common security.”

Duda said Poland fully supports the establishment of an independent impartial and professional mechanism to attribute responsibility for the use of chemical weapons in Syria. He stressed, “Any such crime must be properly investigated, and those responsible held accountable; those crimes should never happen again.”

The Polish President said his country also supports deploying UN peacekeepers to Eastern Ukraine, adding that the mission should cover “the whole area of the conflict, including the entire Ukrainian-Russian internationally recognized border.” He said the illegal annexation of Crimea and the separatists in Donbas are a major challenge not only to Ukraine, but also to the stability of the Europe as a whole. He added that the international community should not “lose its focus on the ongoing desperate plight of the Crimean Tatars and human rights activists in the occupied Crimea, who are subject to constant intimidation.”

Dutch Foreign Minister Stef Blok said, despite the vast progress made, the international rulebook is under serious pressure. He said the situation in Syria has been “a stark reminder” of a deep crisis. He added, “From the Geneva Conventions, to the Charter of the UN, to the Chemical Weapons Convention - in Syria, all of these norms were trampled.” He reiterated his call on the Security Council to refer the situation in Syria to the International Criminal Court.

Judge Theodor Meron, President of the International Residual Mechanism for Criminal Tribunals, also spoke at the Council’s debate which focused on upholding international law within the context of the maintenance of international peace and security. Meron said the work of the Council nearly 25 years ago resulted in an ever-increasing expectation in communities around the world that where atrocities are committed in violation of international law, accountability will follow. He noted however that there was a long way to go adding that the world was facing a period of contraction in the efforts to advance accountability after a remarkable period of expansion.

SOUNDBITE (English) Theodor Meron, President of the International Residual Mechanism for Criminal Tribunals:
“In action and outright intransigence risk – let me be quite clear about it - undermining accountability gains in quite a verity of fora. If efforts to ensure accountability for violations of international law are to succeed in the long run, this Council, its Members, and the international community more generally must continue to actively engage with and sustain them.”

Judge Meron said this meant not simply expressing support in rhetorical terms but taking concrete steps to affirmatively contribute to the work of existing courts, such as the International Criminal Court (ICC). This included complying with judicial orders, arrest warrants, enforcing sentences, and complying with investigations among others. Meron said it was time for a paradigm shift in the Council which would simply refer possible violations of international law to the appropriate judicial actors. He said doing so would not only enhance accountability but also the Council’s efficiency and credibility through demonstrating consistency in its approach to accountability.
Series
Category
Topical Subjects
Geographic Subjects
Corporate Subjects
Creator
UNIFEED
Alternate Title
unifeed180517a
Asset ID
2154257