DRC / CHILDREN FORMERLY ASSOCIATED WITH THE MILITIA

Preview Language:   Original
ENGLISH , KISWAHILI 16-May-2018 00:01:34
The conflict in the Greater Kasai region of the Democratic Republic of Congo has had a devastating impact on children, leaving some 2.3 million in desperate humanitarian need. UNICEF
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STORY: DRC / CHILDREN FORMERLY ASSOCIATED WITH THE MILITIA
TRT: 1:34
SOURCE: UNICEF
RESTRICTIONS: PLEASE CREDIT UNICEF ON SCREEN
LANGUAGE: LOCAL /ENGLISH /NATS

DATELINE: 9-10 MAY 2018, KANANGA, KASAI-CENTRAL PROVINCE, DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF THE CONGO

SHOTLIST:

1. Shift focus, flowers in field to huts
2. Med shot, kids walking by
3. Close up, Matisse’s* profile
4. SOUNDBITE (Local) Matisse* sixteen, formerly associated with the militia:
“I became a member of the militia because they promised us lots of stuff like motorbikes, land and nice houses.”
5. Close up, Matisse’s hand
6. SOUNDBITE (Local) Matisse* sixteen, formerly associated with the militia:
“It is like the Kayanda baptism when they put a red band around your head. It makes you disappear. So, they tied it around you and you’d vanish. The Tumbulundu baptism makes you immune to punches and no bullet can piece your body.”
7. Various shots, boys playing football
8. SOUNDBITE (English) Fatoumata Ndiaye, UNICEF Deputy Executive Director: “To help former child soldiers, we have children in transitional orientation centers. We are giving them psychosocial support, life-saving skills. We are also keeping them safe in that environment to help the reintegration into the families and communities.”
9. Close up, Matisse playing with ball

STORYLINE:

The conflict in the Greater Kasai region of the Democratic Republic of Congo has had a devastating impact on children, leaving some 2.3 million in desperate humanitarian need.

The violence has resulted in a massive malnutrition and protection crisis. Grave violations against children have been committed – children were made to fight, kill and young girls raped and forced into child marriage.

Last year, Matisse*, who was 16 years old at the time, joined a militia because he was promised money, land, a car, anything he wanted as long as he won battles. Matisse was also given potions to make him feel invincible.

SOUNDBITE (Local) Matisse* sixteen, formerly associated with the militia:
“It is like the Kayanda baptism when they put a red band around your head. It makes you disappear. So, they tied it around you and you’d vanish. The Tumbulundu baptism makes you immune to punches and no bullet can piece your body.”

Now, as the conflict has lulled, many children like Matisse have left the militia. He is now staying in a UNICEF-supported Transit and Orientation Center in Kananga. These types of centers are a lifeline and a safe haven for children like Matisse.

SOUNDBITE (English) Fatoumata Ndiaye, UNICEF Deputy Executive Director: “To help former child soldiers, we have children in transitional orientation centers. We are giving them psychosocial support, life-saving skills. We are also keeping them safe in that environment to help the reintegration into the families and communities.”

Matisse is determined to study and go to university so that he can become a lawyer and help children live a safe and fruitful life.
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UNICEF
Alternate Title
unifeed180516a
Asset ID
2152853