UN / WOMEN PEACE SECURITY

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16-Apr-2018 00:03:23
Speaking at a Security Council meeting on sexual violence in conflict, the Deputy Secretary-General, Amina Mohammed, said “gender-based discrimination is the invisible driver of most crimes of sexual violence,” adding that “the lower a woman’s status -- in terms of health, wealth and education -- the greater is her vulnerability and exposure to harm.” UNIFEED

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STORY: UN / WOMEN PEACE SECURITY
TRT: 03:23
SOURCE: UNIFEED
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LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 16 APRIL 2018, NEW YORK CITY

SHOTLIST:

RECENT – NEW YORK CITY

1. Exterior, United Nations Headquarters

16 APRIL 2018, NEW YORK CITY

2. Various shots, Security Council
3. SOUNDBITE (English) Amina Mohammed, United Nations Deputy Secretary-General:
“Gender-based discrimination is the invisible driver of most crimes of sexual violence. And, the lower a woman’s status -- in terms of health, wealth and education -- the greater is her vulnerability and exposure to harm.”
4. Med shot, delegates
5. SOUNDBITE (English) Amina Mohammed, United Nations Deputy Secretary-General:
“Our responsibility must be to bring justice, recognition and reparations to the survivors of these horrendous crimes. Not only justice in the courtrooms, but also social justice and economic empowerment.”
6. Med shot,
7. SOUNDBITE (English) Pramila Patten, Special Representative of the Secretary-General on Sexual Violence in Conflict, United Nations:
“Stigma and victim-blame give the weapon of rape its uniquely destructive power, including the power to shred the social fabric, and turn victims into outcasts. It is also the reason that sexual violence remains one of the least -reported of all crimes.”
8. Med shot, delegates
9. SOUNDBITE (English) Pramila Patten, Special Representative of the Secretary-General on Sexual Violence in Conflict, United Nations:
“It is a travesty and an outrage that not a single member of ISIL or Boko Haram has yet been convicted for sexual violence as an international crime.”
10. Med shot, delegates
11. SOUNDBITE (English) Pramila Patten, Special Representative of the Secretary-General on Sexual Violence in Conflict, United Nations:
12. Med shot, delegates
13. SOUNDBITE (English) Pramila Patten, Special Representative of the Secretary-General on Sexual Violence in Conflict, United Nations:
“Socioeconomic reintegration support for sexual violence survivors and their children must infuse peace-building, reconstruction and reconciliation efforts.”
14. Wide shot, Security Council
15. SOUNDBITE (English) Razia Sultana, Rohingya Lawyer and Senior Researcher of Kaladan Press:
“The international community, especially the Security Council, has failed us. This latest crisis should have been prevented if the warning signs since 2012 had not been ignored.”
16. Wide shot, Security Council
17. SOUNDBITE (English) Razia Sultana, Rohingya Lawyer and Senior Researcher of Kaladan Press:
“Sexual violence involved hundreds of soldiers and occurred across a vast part of Rakhine State. Such scale and breadth provide strong evidence that rape was systematically planned and used as a weapon against my people.”
18. Wide shot, Security Council
19. SOUNDBITE (English) Razia Sultana, Rohingya Lawyer and Senior Researcher of Kaladan Press:
“It is hypocritical to condemn the human rights violation and express horror at the new violence, while then also selling arms to Myanmar and seek explorative licenses to mine its natural resources.”
20. Wide shot, Security Council
21. SOUNDBITE (English) Razia Sultana, Rohingya Lawyer and Senior Researcher of Kaladan Press:
“Member States committed to conflict prevention and sustaining peace cannot turn a blind eye to state-sanctioned ethnic minority persecution, discrimination or other human rights violations including sexual violence, for trade.”
22. SOUNDBITE (English) Alice Bah Kuhnke, Minister for Culture and Democracy, Sweden:
“The importance of women in peacekeeping no longer needs to be justified. The evidence speaks to itself. With more female peacekeepers and police officers we can achieve more, and reach the whole population in a conflict area.”
23. Various shots, Security Council

STORYLINE:

The United Nations (UN) Deputy Secretary-General said today “gender-based discrimination is the invisible driver of most crimes of sexual violence,” adding that “the lower a woman’s status, the greater is her vulnerability and exposure to harm.”

Speaking today (16 Apr) at the Security Council open debate on sexual violence in conflicts, the UN deputy chief Amina Mohammed said that in Myanmar and in many other conflict situations, the widespread threat and use of sexual violence has, once again, been used as a tactic to advance military, economic and ideological objectives.

She said that the international community’s responsibility “must be to bring justice, recognition and reparations to the survivors of these horrendous crimes. Not only justice in the courtrooms, but also social justice and economic empowerment.”

Last year, the Deputy Secretary-General travelled with the Special Representative of the Secretary-General (SRSG) on Sexual Violence in Conflict Pramila Patten to Nigeria and the Democratic Republic of Congo, where they visited the survivors of sexual violence.

Highlighting that survivors endured multiple, intersecting stigmas in the wake of sexual violence, including the stigma of association with an armed or terrorist group, and of bearing children conceived through rape, SRSG Patten said “stigma and victim-blame give the weapon of rape its uniquely destructive power, including the power to shred the social fabric, and turn victims into outcasts.”

She added “it is also the reason that sexual violence remains one of the least -reported of all crimes.”

Despite some landmark cases, such as the ICC ruling in the trial of Bosco Ntaganda in 2017, Patten stated that mass rape continues to be met with mass impunity.

She said “it is a travesty and an outrage that not a single member of ISIL or Boko Haram has yet been convicted for sexual violence as an international crime.”

Patten called on the international community to give serious consideration to the establishment of a reparations fund for survivors of conflict-related sexual violence, to help them rebuild their lives and livelihood.

She also noted that there should be a more operational response to stigma alleviation, saying that “socioeconomic reintegration support for sexual violence survivors and their children must infuse peace-building, reconstruction and reconciliation efforts.”

Razia Sultana, a Rohingya Lawyer who has been working directly with Rohingya women and girls in the refugee camps in Bangladesh since 2014 told the Council that “the international community, especially the Security Council, has failed us.”

She said “this latest crisis should have been prevented if the warning signs since 2012 had not been ignored.”

Speaking about her research and interviews providing evidence that Government troops raped over 300 women and girls in 17 villages in Rakhine States, Saltana said “sexual violence involved hundreds of soldiers and occurred across a vast part of Rakhine State,” adding that “such scale and breadth provide strong evidence that rape was systematically planned and used as a weapon against my people.”

The Rohingya Lawyer reiterated “it is hypocritical to condemn the human rights violation and express horror at the new violence, while then also selling arms to Myanmar and seek explorative licenses to mine its natural resources.”

She added, “Member States committed to conflict prevention and sustaining peace cannot turn a blind eye to state-sanctioned ethnic minority persecution, discrimination or other human rights violations including sexual violence, for trade.”

On women’s role in peacekeeping, Alice Bah Kuhnke, the Swedish Minister for Culture and Democracy said “the importance of women in peacekeeping no longer needs to be justified. The evidence speaks to itself. With more female peacekeepers and police officers we can achieve more, and reach the whole population in a conflict area.”
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