WHO / ANTIBIOTICS

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07-Nov-2017 00:02:21
The World Health Organization (WHO) launched new guidelines recommending that farmers and the food industry stop using antibiotics routinely to promote growth and prevent disease in healthy animals. WHO

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STORY: WHO / ANTIBIOTICS
TRT: 02:21
SOURCE: WHO
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 07 NOVEMBER 2017, GENEVA, SWITZERLAND

SHOTLIST:

1. Zoom out, from report to experts discussing guidelines
2. SOUNDBITE (English) Awa Aidara-Kane, Coordinator, Department of Food Safety, World Health Organization (WHO):
“The guidelines that we are launching today build on 20 years of WHO work on antimicrobial use in animals and impacts on public health. And these recommendations have been dealt before by WHO, but now we have gathered more evidence to back these recommendations.”
3. Close up, Dr Aidara-Kane talking
4. SOUNDBITE (English) Awa Aidara-Kane, Coordinator, Department of Food Safety, World Health Organization (WHO):
“The main recommendations are reducing overall use of antimicrobials and, how do we do this? First, stop using antimicrobials as growth promotion. Stop unnecessary use, for example, for prevention, certain types of prevention, and also, use antimicrobials only for treatment and control of established infections in animals.”
5. Pan left, experts discussing guidelines
6. SOUNDBITE (English) Awa Aidara-Kane, Coordinator, Department of Food Safety, World Health Organization (WHO):
“The good news is that these guidelines have been implemented now in many countries, in Europe for example, and we are seeing significant impact on the reduction of resistant bacteria in the human population.”
7. Tilt up, from report to experts discussing guidelines
8. SOUNDBITE (English) Kazuaki Miyagishima, Director, Department of Food Safety, World Health Organization (WHO):
“In some countries, up to 80 percent of antimicrobials, or antibiotics, are given to animals, not to humans. In addition, a majority of these antibiotics are the same as, or belong to the same classes of antibiotic used in humans.”
9. Med shot, experts discussing guidelines
10. SOUNDBITE (English) Kazuaki Miyagishima, Director, Department of Food Safety, World Health Organization (WHO):
“The resistant bacteria that emerge in animals can jump to humans through food, through direct contact with animals, and through environment.”
11. Med shot, experts discussing guidelines
12. SOUNDBITE (English) Kazuaki Miyagishima, Director, Department of Food Safety, World Health Organization (WHO):
“This is the reason why we need to take actions, not only in human medicine to curb unnecessary use of antibiotics, but we have to also take actions in animal production to reduce unnecessary use of antibiotics in animal production.”
13. Close up, report

STORYLINE:

The World Health Organization (WHO) today (07 Nov) launched new guidelines on use of medically important antimicrobials in food-producing animals, recommending that farmers and the food industry stop using antibiotics routinely to promote growth and prevent disease in healthy animals.

SOUNDBITE (English) Awa Aidara-Kane, Coordinator, Department of Food Safety, World Health Organization (WHO):
“The guidelines that we are launching today build on 20 years of WHO work on antimicrobial use in animals and impacts on public health. And these recommendations have been dealt before by WHO, but now we have gathered more evidence to back these recommendations.”

Overuse and misuse of antibiotics in animals and humans is contributing to the rising threat of antibiotic resistance. Some types of bacteria that cause serious infections in humans have already developed resistance to most or all of the available treatments, and there are very few promising options in the research pipeline.

SOUNDBITE (English) Awa Aidara-Kane, Coordinator, Department of Food Safety, World Health Organization (WHO):
“The main recommendations are reducing overall use of antimicrobials and, how do we do this? First, stop using antimicrobials as growth promotion. Stop unnecessary use, for example, for prevention, certain types of prevention, and also, use antimicrobials only for treatment and control of established infections in animals.”

Many countries have already taken action to reduce the use of antibiotics in food-producing animals. For example, since 2006, the European Union has banned the use of antibiotics for growth promotion. Consumers are also driving the demand for meat raised without routine use of antibiotics, with some major food chains adopting “antibiotic-free” policies for their meat supplies.
Alternative options to using antibiotics for disease prevention in animals include improving hygiene, better use of vaccination, and changes in animal housing and husbandry practices.

SOUNDBITE (English) Awa Aidara-Kane, Coordinator, Department of Food Safety, World Health Organization (WHO):
“The good news is that these guidelines have been implemented now in many countries, in Europe for example, and we are seeing significant impact on the reduction of resistant bacteria in the human population.”

The new WHO recommendations aim to help preserve the effectiveness of antibiotics that are important for human medicine by reducing their unnecessary use in animals. In some countries, approximately 80 percent of total consumption of medically important antibiotics is in the animal sector, largely for growth promotion in healthy animals.

SOUNDBITE (English) Kazuaki Miyagishima, Director, Department of Food Safety, World Health Organization (WHO):
“In some countries, up to 80 percent of antimicrobials, or antibiotics, are given to animals, not to humans. In addition, a majority of these antibiotics are the same as, or belong to the same classes of antibiotic used in humans.”

WHO strongly recommends an overall reduction in the use of all classes of medically important antibiotics in food-producing animals, including complete restriction of these antibiotics for growth promotion and disease prevention without diagnosis. Healthy animals should only receive antibiotics to prevent disease if it has been diagnosed in other animals in the same flock, herd, or fish population.

SOUNDBITE (English) Kazuaki Miyagishima, Director, Department of Food Safety, World Health Organization (WHO):
“The resistant bacteria that emerge in animals can jump to humans through food, through direct contact with animals, and through environment.”

Where possible, sick animals should be tested to determine the most effective and prudent antibiotic to treat their specific infection. Antibiotics used in animals should be selected from those WHO has listed as being “least important” to human health, and not from those classified as “highest priority critically important”. These antibiotics are often the last line, or one of limited treatments, available to treat serious bacterial infections in humans.

SOUNDBITE (English) Kazuaki Miyagishima, Director, Department of Food Safety, World Health Organization (WHO):
“This is the reason why we need to take actions, not only in human medicine to curb unnecessary use of antibiotics, but we have to also take actions in animal production to reduce unnecessary use of antibiotics in animal production.”

The overall objective is to encourage prudent use to slow down antimicrobial resistance and preserve the effectiveness of the most critical antibiotics for medicine. The guidelines issued today incorporate this objective in its recommendations for antibiotic use in agriculture.
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