UNFPA / WORLD POPULATION REPORT

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16-Oct-2017 00:01:16
A new United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) report released today says that inequalities in women’s reproductive health are linked to economic inequality. UNFPA / FILE

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STORY: UNFPA / WORLD POPULATION REPORT
TRT: 1:16
SOURCE: UNFPA
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LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 15 SEPTEMBER 2017, UNFPA HEADQUARTERS, NEW YORK CITY / 16 OCTOBER 2017, NEW YORK CITY / FILE

SHOTLIST:

16 OCTOBER 2017, NEW YORK CITY

1. Various shots, report cover

15 SEPTEMBER 2017, UNFPA HEADQUARTERS, NEW YORK CITY

2. SOUNDBITE (English) Natalia Kanem, Executive Director, United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA):
“The new UNFPA report clearly shows that inequalities in women’s reproductive health relates directly to economic inequality.”

16 OCTOBER 2017, NEW YORK CITY

3. Various shots, report

15 SEPTEMBER 2017, UNFPA HEADQUARTERS, NEW YORK CITY

4. SOUNDBITE (English) Natalia Kanem, Executive Director, United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA):
“A woman who cannot enjoy her reproductive health, her reproductive rights is someone who is not going to be able to have a fair shake in the economy.”

16 OCTOBER 2017, NEW YORK CITY

5. Close up, report

15 SEPTEMBER 2017, UNFPA HEADQUARTERS, NEW YORK CITY

6. SOUNDBITE (English) Natalia Kanem, Executive Director, United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA):
“Being wealthy should have nothing to do with a woman or a girl being able to enjoy her reproductive health and rights. And that is the point that is being made in the 2017 UNFPA State of World Population Report - to end inequality.”

FILE – UNFPA – MAY 2015, JORDAN

7. Various shots, women at health centre

STORYLINE:

A new United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) report released today (17 Oct) says that inequalities in women’s reproductive health are linked to economic inequality.

The Executive Director of UNFPA Natalia Kanem said “a woman who cannot enjoy her reproductive health, her reproductive rights, is someone who is not going to be able to have a fair shake in the economy.”

According to the State of World Population report, the unmet demand for family planning in developing countries, is generally greatest among women at the bottom of the wealth scale. Without access to contraception, women who are less educated and live in rural areas, are at heightened risk of unintended pregnancy. This results in greater health risks and lifelong economic repercussions for herself and her children.

The report says that in developing countries, 12.8 million adolescent girls have an unmet need for family planning. Adolescents, especially those who are not married or in a union, face more obstacles than adults in obtaining contraceptives because of restrictive laws and policies, concerns about confidentiality, or stigma associated with sex at an early age. An estimated 89 million unintended pregnancies occur annually in the developing world.

Kanem said “being wealthy should have nothing to do with a woman or a girl being able to enjoy her reproductive health and rights. And that is the point that is being made in the 2017 UNFPA State of World Population Report - to end inequality.”

The report also says that reproductive health inequalities are deeply affected by the quality and reach of health system and by gender inequality, which can have a profound impact on how much control a woman has over her own sexual and reproductive health. Overcoming these obstacles and tackling underlying gender inequality are critical to progress in reducing inequalities in sexual and reproductive health and could lead to progress in reducing economic inequalities.

The report also notes that inequality is often understood in terms of income or wealth—the dividing line between the rich and poor. But, in reality, economic disparities are only one part of the inequality story. Many other social, racial, political and institutional dimensions feed on each other, and together block hope for progress among people on the margins.

Two critical dimensions are gender inequality, and inequalities in realizing sexual and reproductive health and rights; the latter, in particular, still receives inadequate attention. Neither explains the totality of inequality in the world today, but both are essential pieces that demand much more action.

UNFPA is the lead UN agency for delivering a world where every pregnancy is wanted, every childbirth is safe and every young person's potential is fulfilled.
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unifeed171016b
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2003983