UN / BOKO HARAM OBRIEN

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12-Jan-2017 00:02:58
United Nations (UN) humanitarian head, Stephen O’Brien, told the Security Council that what began as a protection crisis in the Lake Chad Basin, has become a major food and nutrition crisis, “one of the largest humanitarian crises in the world.” UNIFEED / FILE

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STORY: UN / BOKO HARAM
TRT: 02:58
SOURCE: UNIFEED / OCHA
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LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 12 JANUARY 2017, NEW YORK CITY / FILE

SHOTLIST:

FILE – RECENT, NEW YORK CITY

1. Wide shot, exterior United Nations headquarters

12 JANUARY 2017, NEW YORK CITY

2. Wide shot, Security Council
3. Pan right, delegates
4. SOUNDBITE (English) Stephen O'Brien United Nations Under-Secretary-General for Humanitarian Affairs:
“The humanitarian crisis across north-east Nigeria and parts of Cameroon, Chad and Niger, triggered by the horrendous, violent and inhuman campaign of Boko Haram, is deepening. Although Boko Haram has lost much of the territory that it once controlled – but by no means all – raids and suicide bombings targeting civilians continue to cause widespread death and destruction, fear, psychological and physical traumas, prevent people from accessing essential services, and wipe out livelihoods and infrastructure.”
5. Wide shot, Council
6. SOUNDBITE (English) Stephen O'Brien United Nations Under-Secretary-General for Humanitarian Affairs:
“What started as a protection crisis has become also a major food and nutrition crisis, today one of the largest humanitarian crisis in the world. One year ago, there were three million severely food insecure people in need of assistance across the Lake Chad Basin; despite the government’s security offensive ratchetted up over the last six months, it has regained land and released people and communities trapped and captured at the tyrannous hands of Boko Haram, thus pealing back the visibility of the numbers of oppressed, hungry, abused people at a rapid pace, often more rapidly than the humanitarian response could accelerate, or, for us to raise more funds from you, the international community, to keep up.”
7. Wide shot, Council
8. SOUNDBITE (English) Samantha Power, Permanent Representative of the United States to the United Nations:
“The Chibok girls, kidnapped more than 1,000 days ago from their school, remain the most well-known examples of Boko Haram brutality. With 195 of those girls in captivity to this day, they are among though, just the thousands and thousands of people held by Boko Haram, as millions across the region live in fear that Boko Haram will capture them or their loved ones next. The deepening linkages between Boko Haram and the Islamic State are alarming and suggest ominously that this clear and present threat to international peace and security may get worse.”
9. Wide shot, Council

FILE – OCHA - 30 NOVEMBER 2016, MAIDUGURI, NIGERIA

10. Various shots, women and children outside their shelters at IDP camp
11. Various shots, women and children collecting food items from camp officials

STORYLINE:

United Nations (UN) humanitarian head, Stephen O’Brien, told the Security Council today (12 Jan) that what began as a protection crisis in the Lake Chad Basin, has become a major food and nutrition crisis, “one of the largest humanitarian crises in the world.”

O’Brien said that the humanitarian crisis across the region “triggered by the horrendous, violent and inhuman campaign of Boko Haram, is deepening,” and noted that “raids and suicide bombings targeting civilians continue to cause widespread death and destruction, fear, psychological and physical traumas, prevent people from accessing essential services, and wipe out livelihoods and infrastructure.”

He noted that “despite the government’s security offensive ratchetted up over the last six months, it has regained land and released people and communities trapped and captured at the tyrannous hands of Boko Haram, thus pealing back the visibility of the numbers of oppressed, hungry, abused people at a rapid pace, often more rapidly than the humanitarian response could accelerate, or, for us to raise more funds from you, the international community, to keep up.”

United States Ambassador Samantha Power, in her address to the Council recalled that 195 of the Chibok girls kidnapped by Boko Haram almost three years ago, remain in captivity to this day.

She said they are among “the thousands and thousands of people held by Boko Haram, as millions across the region live in fear that Boko Haram will capture them or their loved ones next.”

Power said “the deepening linkages between Boko Haram and the Islamic State are alarming and suggest ominously that this clear and present threat to international peace and security may get worse.”
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UNIFEED
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unifeed170112e
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1813124