GA / GLOBAL TOWNHALL 2

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12-Jul-2016 00:02:57
For the first time, candidates for the position of next Secretary-General took part in a globally televised and webcast event in the General Assembly Hall and took questions from diplomats and the public at large. The second set of candidates included Helen Clark (New Zealand), Danilo Turk (Slovenia), Christiana Figueres (Costa Rica), Igor Lukšić (Montenegro) and Irina Bokova (Bulgaria). UNIFEED-UNTV

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STORY: GA / GLOBAL TOWNHALL 2
TRT: 02:57
SOURCE: UNIFEED-UNTV
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 12 JULY 2016, NEW YORK CITY / RECENT

SHOTLIST:

RECENT, NEW YORK CITY

1. Wide shot, United Nations Headquarters

12 JULY 2016, NEW YORK CITY

2. Wide shot, General Assembly
3. Wide shot, audience
4. SOUNDBITE (English) Helen Clark, Administrator of the United Nations Development Programme:
“We have to get better at preventing conflict and resolving conflict. I believe the long term answers lie in building peaceful and inclusive societies which will talk their differences out and not fight them out. But in the short term, we have to get a lot better at anticipating those warning signs of what could spill over into serious human rights abuses and conflict.”
5. Wide shot, applause
6. SOUNDBITE (English) Danilo Turk, Former President of Slovenia:
“We need commitment and we need vision. And I believe that in my 30 years of work with the United Nations I have gained a great deal of experience in human rights, in dealing with political issues in the General Assembly and the Security Council, and later as Assistant Secretary-General for Political Affairs. The interesting thing is that in all this time, my commitment to the United Nations has only grown stronger.”
7. Wide shot, applause
8. SOUNDBITE (English) Christiana Figueres, Former Executive Secretary of the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC):
“My vision is that of a community of nations coming together to work in a deeply collaborative manner to address the toughest problems of our planet. I know that this is difficult. I know it is difficult because I have done it.”
9. Med shot, moderator
10. SOUNDBITE (English) Igor Lukšić, Former Prime Minister of Montenegro:
“I come from a country which 20 years ago was in a region that was engulfed in war. We had mass massacres, we had a number of different other problems, but we have managed to come out of the crisis, we have managed to sustain peace, we have always been investing a lot in multi-religiousness, multi-culturality of my country, and I believe we have developed also a certain transitional experience that can show to the world certain examples that can be actually what the world today needs.”
11. Wide shot, candidates on stage
12. SOUNDBITE (English) Irina Bokova, Director-General of UNESCO:
“I am a deep believer in multilateralism, coming from a country that is multicultural bridge between the East and the West. And coming from East Europe, we in Eastern Europe – and I turn to Igor and Danilo - have gone through a profound change. We know what transformation of societies. We know what it is to make democratic societies and to instil some democratic values. And I think we are deep believers precisely because of that.”
14. Wide shot, applause

STORYLINE:

For the first time, candidates for the position of next Secretary-General today (12 July) took part in a globally televised and webcast event in the General Assembly Hall and took questions from diplomats and the public at large.

The event was webcast and broadcast live by UNTV and Al Jazeera Media Network across multiple broadcast and social media channels.

Ten of the 12 official candidates, nominated by their governments to take over at the helm of the UN Secretariat when current Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon leaves at the end of the year, engaged in a wide-ranging 60-minute discussion about the challenges and opportunities facing the organization.

The Administrator of the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), Helen Clark from New Zealand, said the United Nations must “get better at preventing conflict and resolving conflict.”

Clark said “we have to get a lot better at anticipating those warning signs of what could spill over into serious human rights abuses and conflict.”

Former President of Slovenia, Danilo Turk, said “we need commitment and we need vision.”

Turk lauded his 30 years of experience with the United Nations, where he held various posts, including Assistant Secretary-General for Political Affairs and said “the interesting thing is that in all this time, my commitment to the United Nations has only grown stronger.”

Christiana Figueres from Costa Rica, who is the Former Executive Secretary of the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) said “my vision is that of a community of nations coming together to work in a deeply collaborative manner to address the toughest problems of our planet. I know that this is difficult. I know it is difficult because I have done it.”

Figueres played a leading role in the negotiations that ended with the signing of the historic Paris Agreement on climate change last December.

The Former Prime Minister of Montenegro, Igor Lukšić, spoke about the changes that have occurred in the past 20 years in his country and in Eastern Europe.

He said “we had mass massacres, we had a number of different other problems, but we have managed to come out of the crisis, we have managed to sustain peace, we have always been investing a lot in multi-religiousness, multi-culturality of my country, and I believe we have developed also a certain transitional experience that can show to the world certain examples that can be actually what the world today needs.”

Striking a similar note, Irina Bokova from Bulgaria who is the Director-General of UNESCO, said Eastern European countries “have gone through a profound change. We know what transformation of societies. We know what it is to make democratic societies and to instil some democratic values. And I think we are deep believers precisely because of that.”

The General Assembly Hall’s 1,900 seats were filled to capacity with ambassadors, diplomats, UN staff, journalists and leaders from business and civil society. UN-accredited journalists are also invited to film and record from the media booths.

The 10-confirmed candidates were split into two groups of five (determined by draw of lots) for a one-hour discussion and Q and A led by moderators James Bays and Folly Bah Thibault from Al Jazeera English. Questions to the candidates from Member States and the global public will come from the floor and via video from around the world.

The first group included Vesna Pusić (Croatia), António Guterres (Portugal) Susana Malcorra (Argentina), Vuk Jeremic (Serbia) and Natalia Gherman (Moldova).

The second group featured Helen Clark (New Zealand), Danilo Turk (Slovenia), Christiana Figueres (Costa Rica), Igor Lukšić (Montenegro) and Irina Bokova (Bulgaria).

The two candidates unable to attend the event in New York are Srgjan Kerim (Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia) and Miroslav Lajčák (Slovak Republic). However, both have been invited to send video messages that can be used in the event.
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