UN / BROOKLYN

Preview Language:   Original
11-Feb-2016 00:03:46
The Academy Award nominated film Brooklyn was screened at the United Nations. The film, starring Oscar-nominated actress Saoirse Ronan, tells the story of a young girl from Ireland who migrates to New York in the 1950s.

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STORY: UN / BROOKLYN
TRT: 03:46
SOURCE: UNIFEED - UNTV / FOX SEARCHLIGHT PICTURES
RESTRICTIONS: APTN LIBRARY – NO ACCESS
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 11 FEBRUARY 2016, NEW YORK CITY / FILE

SHOTLIST:

1. Wide shot, exterior UN headquarters
2. Various shots, Saoirse Ronan at UN Headquarters
3. SOUNDBITE (English) Saoirse Ronan, Actress:
“For all of us that have comfortable homes, and have work, and are able to move about as we please, for us to individualize and sort of zone in on one individual story, it’s really important and it’s really the only way that we’ll be able to sort of emotionally connect to these people and understand, or try to understand their struggle and help.”

FOX SEARCHLIGHT PICTURES HANDOUT

4. Various shots, scenes from the film Brooklyn

11 FEBRUARY 2016, NEW YORK CITY

5. SOUNDBITE (English) Saoirse Ronan, Actress:
“Hopefully if people see a film like Brooklyn and it’s something that really hit home they can understand after following this young girl’s story that it could be like this for someone else right now and they can be part of making a change.”

FOX SEARCHLIGHT PICTURES HANDOUT

6. Various shots, scenes from the film Brooklyn

11 FEBRUARY 2016, NEW YORK CITY

7. Close up, book reading sign
8. Wide shot, book reading
9. Close up, woman holding open book
10. Various shots, Colm Tóibín signing books
11. SOUNDBITE (English) Colm Tóibín, Author:
“Moving from one country to another, if you are young, and no matter what age you are, brings with it an immense amount of difficulty, emotional difficulty, and indeed financial and economic difficulty. But that you are two people, that you become conflicted. And I think if we start thinking about migration in that way, not wandering what effect it will have on the country, but what effect it will have on the people, on the individuals who migrate, we might start getting somewhere.”
12. Various shots, Tóibín’s book Brooklyn on the shelves
13. SOUNDBITE (English) Colm Tóibín, Author:
“Would you like someone to do this to you, or to have done it to your grandparents or to do it to your grandchildren? Would you like that? If you wouldn’t, and you probably wouldn’t, then, could you then start imagining what it is like to be somebody else and offer them assistance in whatever way you can, even if it is by how you vote in an election for a party that doesn’t represent for example racial hatred.”
14. Wide shot, Karen AbuZayd at her desk
15. SOUNDBITE (English) Karen AbuZayd, Special Adviser on the Summit on Addressing Large Movements of Refugees and Migrants:
“The developed countries need many of these people. They need a workforce. We talk about the demographics of an aging population, they need young people. Many of these people, especially those Syrians who are on the move, many are very sophisticated, well educated, looking to make a kind of contribution.”
16. Wide shot, Karen AbuZayd at her desk

FILE – UNICEF - SEPTEMBER 2015, LESBOS, GREECE

15. Wide shot, refugees arriving by boat
16. Various shots, volunteers helping refugees off the boat

FILE - UNHCR - 2 JANUARY 2014, HADALAT BORDER AREA, NORHT-EASTERN JORDAN

17. Wide shot, silhouette of refugees crossing the desert
18. Pan right, refugee child walking
19. Wide shot, refugees crossing a sand ditch
20. Wide shot, refugees walking across desert

STORYLINE:

The Academy Award nominated film Brooklyn was screened today (11 Feb) at the United Nations. The film, starring Oscar-nominated actress Saoirse Ronan, tells the story of a young girl from Ireland who migrates to New York in the 1950s.

Ronan spoke about the significance of the film in today’s context.

She said “for all of us that have comfortable homes, and have work, and are able to move about as we please, for us to individualize and sort of zone in on one individual story, it’s really important and it’s really the only way that we’ll be able to sort of emotionally connect to these people and understand, or try to understand their struggle and help.”

The actress, who was born in New York to Irish migrant parents, said “hopefully if people see a film like Brooklyn and it’s something that really hit home they can understand after following this young girl’s story that it could be like this for someone else right now and they can be part of making a change.”

Also today at the UN, best-selling author Colm Tóibín read excerpts from his novel “Brooklyn”, on which the film is based.

Tóibín called for a change of mind set in understanding migration and “then start imagining what it is like to be somebody else and offer them assistance in whatever way you can, even if it is by how you vote in an election for a party that doesn’t represent for example racial hatred.”

Karen AbuZayd, who is the Secretary-General’s Special Adviser on the Summit on Addressing Large Movements of Refugees and Migrants said developed countries need a younger workforce and should be open to migrants.

She said “many of these people, especially those Syrians who are on the move, many are very sophisticated, well educated, looking to make a kind of contribution.”

The Summit on Addressing Large Movements of Refugees and Migrants is scheduled in the UN General Assembly for 19 September, one day before the opening of the Assembly’s 2016 General Debate.
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