PAKISTAN / DISPLACED LIVESTOCK

Preview Language:   Original
01-Sep-2014 00:06:17
Around one million people from North Waziristan have been displaced after the Pakistan Army launched a full-scale military operation on 15 June to clear out militants based there. Livestock health is essential to protect the livelihoods of both the IDPs and their hosting communities; as many as 70 percent of the displaced families have carried their animals with them.  UNIC PAKISTAN

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STORY: PAKISTAN / DISPLACED LIVESTOCK
TRT: 6.17
SOURCE: UNIC PAKISTAN
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: PUSHTO / URDU / NATS

DATELINE: RECENT, BANNU, PAKISTAN

SHOTLIST:

1. Wide shot, IDP bringing water for his goat
2. Med shot, IDP bringing water for his goat
3. Close up, IDP standing with his goat
4. Med shot, IDP standing with his cow
5. Wide shot, cow grazing
6. Med shot of host community sitting with IDPs
7. SOUNDBITE (Pushto) Kawtar Khan, 60-Year-Old Farmer from Miran Shah:
“When the operation started we came by foot and left everything behind. We came in a hurry and only brought some animals. Many died along the way.”
8. Close up, Khan’s eyes
9. SOUNDBITE (Pushto) Kawtar Khan, 60-Year-Old Farmer from Miran Shah:
“There is no land to grow food for the animals or shelter. We are worried about their food. There are fears of diseases in the animals as they are out in the open and in the heat. We need help from the Government.”
10. Wide shot, animal registration of IDPs
11. Various shots, livestock rep during registration process
12. SOUNDBITE (Urdu) Dr Rafi Ullah Qureshi, Department of Livestock, Bannu:
“Our work with the IDPs firstly involves getting them registered- their names and where they’ve come from. We then record how many animals they’ve brought- large ones like cows and buffalos, smaller ones like goats and sheep or donkeys or horses. We ask about any problems they may have as they have travelled for a long time and try to solve those. But if they have no problems we vaccinate them according to profile like we vaccinate cows and buffalos for HS (hemorrhagic septicemia) and we vaccinate small castles like sheep and goats for ETV. Third, from FAO who have given us PPR so we vaccinate the livestock?”
13. Wide shot, animal registration of IDPs
14. Various shots, livestock rep during registration process
15. SOUNDBITE (Urdu) Dr Rafi Ullah Qureshi, Department of Livestock, Bannu:
“The condition of the animals was very bad because for an animal, a journey of one or two days on foot can be very difficult. When these people first arrived in June it was very hot and many animals suffered from heat stroke, weight loss and females were unable to produce any milk. Their overall condition was very poor.”
16. Wide shot, cow grazing in a dry land
17. Med shot, cow grazing in a dry land
18. Wide shot, goats under direct sun without shade
19. Med shot, medicine distribution to local community and IDPs for their animal
20. SOUNDBITE (Urdu) Mohammad Khan, 28-year-old Farmer:
“Our animals are now hungry as earlier we had enough food for our animals. We had enough grazing land, grass and fodder. But now on a humanitarian basis we are sharing this food and fodder for animals with the IDPs and we can’t ask them to stop grazing their cattle on our lands because on humanitarian bases we are already sharing many things. We shared our houses and we have not rented out these houses all of it is on a humanitarian basis.”
21. Various shots, animal vaccination
22. Various shots, animals grazing

STORYLINE:

Around one million people from North Waziristan have been displaced after the Pakistan Army launched a full-scale military operation on 15 June to clear out militants based there. Livestock health is essential to protect the livelihoods of both the IDPs and their hosting communities; as many as 70 percent of the displaced families have carried their animals with them.

SOUNDBITE (Pushto) Kawtar Khan, 60-Year-Old Farmer from Miran Shah:
“When the operation started we came by foot and left everything behind. We came in a hurry and only brought some animals. Many died along the way.”

Livestock are invaluable assets to rural families for meat, daily milk production and sale, as well as draught/ tillage power. Loss of their livestock would make people more vulnerable – and more heavily dependent on humanitarian aid.

SOUNDBITE (Pushto) Kawtar Khan, 60-Year-Old Farmer from Miran Shah:
“There is no land to grow food for the animals or shelter. We are worried about their food. There are fears of diseases in the animals as they are out in the open and in the heat. We need help from the Government.”

The displaced livestock need shelter, feed, water, and veterinary care. Many of the animals are carrying ticks which may carry several deadly human and animal diseases (such as Congo virus, Leishmaniasis or Anthrax).

SOUNDBITE (Urdu) Dr Rafi Ullah Qureshi, Department of Livestock, Bannu:
“Our work with the IDPs firstly involves getting them registered- their names and where they’ve come from. We then record how many animals they’ve brought- large ones like cows and buffalos, smaller ones like goats and sheep or donkeys or horses. We ask about any problems they may have as they have travelled for a long time and try to solve those. But if they have no problems we vaccinate them according to profile like we vaccinate cows and buffalos for HS (hemorrhagic septicemia) and we vaccinate small castles like sheep and goats for ETV. Third, from FAO who have given us PPR so we vaccinate the livestock?”

Some displaced animals are also suffering from infectious diseases which can be transmitted to animals of the hosting areas. Another area where UN is providing assistance is livestock support; FAO has provided 100,000 vaccines to the Government of Khyber Pakhtunkkhwa Veterinarian Department, to prevent the spread of diseases.

SOUNDBITE (Urdu) Dr Rafi Ullah Qureshi, Department of Livestock, Bannu:
“The condition of the animals was very bad because for an animal, a journey of one or two days on foot can be very difficult. When these people first arrived in June it was very hot and many animals suffered from heat stroke, weight loss and females were unable to produce any milk. Their overall condition was very poor.”

IDP livestock may carry several infectious diseases transmittable to other animals and to humans, which puts not only the IDP and hosting community livestock, but also humans at risk of disease.

FAO is also working to raise funds to provide more vaccines as well as shelter, feed, and water to the IDP animals, to ensure that livestock continues serving as a source of food and income security for the displaced families.

SOUNDBITE (Urdu) Mohammad Khan, 28-year-old Farmer:
“Our animals are now hungry as earlier we had enough food for our animals. We had enough grazing land, grass and fodder. But now on a humanitarian basis we are sharing this food and fodder for animals with the IDPs and we can’t ask them to stop grazing their cattle on our lands because on humanitarian bases we are already sharing many things. We shared our houses and we have not rented out these houses all of it is on a humanitarian basis.”

According to the KP Livestock Department, some 80,000 large ruminants, 100,000 sheep and goats, and 160,000 chickens have been brought to the hosting districts by the end of June.
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Geographic Subjects
Creator
 UNIC PAKISTAN
Asset ID
1154724