UN / POPULATION AND DEVELOPMENT LAUNCH

12-Feb-2014 00:03:01
Top United Nations officials stressed that while nearly 1 billion people have escaped extreme poverty in the past 20 years and child and maternal mortality have been cut by almost one half, much more work remains to be done to address inequalities and ensure the rights and dignity of all, especially women and children.
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STORY: UN / POPULATION AND DEVELOPMENT LAUNCH
TRT: 3.01
SOURCE: UNTV / UNICEF
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH/ NATS

DATELINE: 12 FEBRUARY 2014, NEW YORK CITY / FILE
SHOTLIST
FILE – RECENT, NEW YORK CITY

1. Wide shot, exterior United Nations headquarters

12 FEBRUARY 2014, NEW YORK CITY

2. Wide shot, dais
3. Med shot, audience
4. SOUNDBITE (English) Ban Ki-moon, United Nations Secretary-General:
“The report we launch today represents a significant contribution to discussions on the post-2015 development agenda. It points to major achievements over the past 20 years. Nearly one billion people have escaped extreme poverty. Child and maternal mortality have been cut by nearly one half. There are more laws to uphold and protect human rights, but enormous inequalities remain in the realization of those rights and access to basic services.”
5. Med shot, journalists
6. SOUNDBITE (English) Ban Ki-moon, United Nations Secretary-General:
“I hope Member States will use the wealth of information in this report in their deliberations on the way forward beyond 2015. I count on the international community to build on the success of the Cairo conference by giving priority to reproductive health reproductive rights.”
7. Med shot, journalists
8. SOUNDBITE (English) Babatunde Osotimehin, Executive Director of the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA):
“Maternal mortality worldwide has fallen by nearly half between 1990 and 2010. More women today have access to education, welcome political participation; more children – particularly girls – are going to school, with primary school enrolment approaching 90 percent. And as the Secretary General has pointed out, nealy one billion people have moved out of extreme poverty. ”
9. Med shot, journalists
10. SOUNDBITE (English) Babatunde Osotimehin, Executive Director of the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA):
“The report reveals in stark detail that persistent inequalities and discrimination threatened to derail development. In many countries and regions, progress is limited to the wealthy, with enormous numbers of people being excluded from the process and the benefits of development. More than half of the absolute gains in global income from 1998 to 2008 went to the richest 5 percent, and none went to the bottom 10 percent.”
11. Zoom out, end of press conference

FILE – UNICEF - 23 NOVEMBER 2013, ADWAL REGION SOMALILAND

12. Med shot, woman holding up her child
13. Med shot, woman being counselled by midwife
14. Tilt up, woman in labour to midwife
15. Wide shot, women walking by health centre
16. Wide shot, health centre
17. Pan left, hospital beds
18. Med shot, woman lying on cot
19. Med shot, woman in a wheelchair
20. Med shot, woman in hospital bed
21. Various shots, women at health centre
STORYLINE
While nearly 1 billion people have escaped extreme poverty in the past 20 years and child and maternal mortality have been cut by almost one half, much more work remains to be done to address inequalities and ensure the rights and dignity of all, especially women and children, top United Nations officials stressed today (12 February).

Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, at a news conference at UN Headquarters to launch the International Conference on Population and Development Global Review Report, said the report “represents a significant contribution to discussions on the post-2015 development agenda” as it points to major achievements over the past 20 years.

He said that despite these achievements, “enormous inequalities remain in the realization of those rights and access to basic services.”

Ban expressed hope that Member States will use the information contained in the report during deliberations on the way forward beyond 2015.

He called on the international community “to build on the success of the Cairo conference by giving priority to reproductive health reproductive rights.”

The International Conference on Population and Development (IPCD), held in Cairo in 1994, was a milestone in the history of population and development, as well as in the history of women’s rights.

A total of 179 Governments signed up to the ICPD Programme of Action, which set out to provide universal access to family planning and sexual and reproductive health services and reproductive rights, and deliver gender equality, empowerment of women and equal access to education for girls.

While describing some of the achievements cited in the report, Babatunde Osotimehin, Executive Director of the UN Population Fund (UNFPA), said that progress over the past 20 years does not tell the whole story.

He highlighted that “more women today have access to education” and “more children – particularly girls – are going to school,” but also noted that “the report reveals in stark detail that persistent inequalities and discrimination threatened to derail development.”

He said that “in many countries and regions, progress is limited to the wealthy, with enormous numbers of people being excluded from the process and the benefits of development. More than half of the absolute gains in global income from 1998 to 2008 went to the richest 5 percent, and none went to the bottom 10 percent.”

Among other challenges, he noted that around 800 women die daily while giving birth; one in three women worldwide report having experienced physical or sexual abuse; and one in three girls in the developing world is married before the age of 18, despite the fact that marriage under 18 is illegal in 158 countries.

The Executive Director went on to add that there is no country today in which women are equal to men in political and economic power. In addition, too many people, particularly the poor, live without access to sexual and reproductive health services, including family planning. Indeed, more than 200 million women in the developing world who want contraception are not getting it.
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