WMO/ GREENHOUSE GAS

06-Nov-2013 00:02:16
The World Meteorological Organization (WMO) said the amount of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere reached a new record high last year, with a 32 percent increase in radiative forcing between 1990 and 2012. CH UNTV / FILE
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STORY: WMO/ GREENHOUSE GAS
TRT: 2.16
SOURCE: UNTV CH / WORLD BANK / UNICEF
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 6 NOVEMBER 2013, GENEVA, SWITZERLAND/ FILE
SHOTLIST
FILE – RECENT, GENEVA, SWITZERLAND

1. Wide shot, Palais des Nations

6 NOVEMBER 2013, GENEVA, SWITZERLAND

2. Pan left, press room
3. SOUNDBITE (English) Michel Jarraud, Secretary General World Meteorological Organization:
“The news are not good news, the news are if you look at the major greenhouse gases in particular CO2, Methane and Nitrous Oxide for all these major greenhouse gasses, the concentrations are reaching once again record levels.”
4. Close up, Greenhouse Gas report
5. SOUNDBITE (English) Michel Jarraud, Secretary General World Meteorological Organization:
“For CO2 we are reaching about 141percent of pre-industrial concentration, in other words we have increased by 41 percent compared to pre-industrial time.”
6. Tilt up, pan from press release to face
7. SOUNDBITE (English) Michel Jarraud, Secretary General World Meteorological Organization:
“CO2 is a very stable gas so it means that there is no sort of chemical reaction which would destroy naturally the CO2 from the atmosphere, so it stays for very long periods, hundreds of years or even more and that’s why as a consequence the actions we take now or the actions we don’t take now will have consequences for very, very long period.”
8. Wide shot, press room
9. SOUNDBITE (English) Michel Jarraud, Secretary General World Meteorological Organization:
10. “For CO2 we know that the concentrations are the highest for more than 800,000 years.”
11. Med shot, hands
12. SOUNDBITE (English) Michel Jarraud, Secretary General World Meteorological Organization: “This year is worse than last year 2011, 2011 was worse than 2010, every year we are reaching new things and the more time is passing without action the more the concentration and as a result the more the impact on the climate change.”
13. Wide shot, press room

FILE – WORLD BANK – 2008, VIETNAM

14. Wide shot, street scene

FILE – WORLD BANK – MAY 2008, INDIA

15. Wide shot, traffic on street
16. Aerial shot, traffic on roads

FILE – UNICEF – FEBRUARY 2008, CHELYABINSK, RUSSIA

17. Close up, smoking chimneys
18. Zoom in, power plant
19. Wide shot, train in front of industrial landscape
20. Close up, exhaust from the car
21. Wide shot, industrial pollution
STORYLINE
The amount of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere reached a new record high in 2012, the World Meteorological Organisation (WMO) said on Wednesday.

The WMO's annual Greenhouse Gas Bulletin shows that between 1990 and 2012 there was a 32 percent increase in radiative forcing – the warming effect on our climate – because of carbon dioxide (CO2) and other heat-trapping long-lived gases such as methane and nitrous oxide.

"The news is not good news, all major greenhouse gasses the concentrations are reaching once again record levels,” WMO Secretary-General Michel Jarraud told a news conference in Geneva at which he presented the U.N. climate agency's annual Greenhouse Gas Bulletin.

Carbon dioxide, mainly from fossil fuel-related emissions, accounted for 80% of this increase. The atmospheric increase of CO2 from 2011 to 2012 was higher than its average growth rate over the past ten years, according to the Greenhouse Gas Bulletin.

Since the start of the industrial era in 1750, the global average concentration of CO2 in the atmosphere has increased by 41 percent, methane by 160 percent and nitrous oxide by 20percent.

This year is worse than last year 2011, 2011 was worse than 2010, every year we are reaching new things and the more time is passing without action the more the concentration and as a result the more the impact on the climate change,” said Jarraud.
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