ETHIOPIA / MALNUTRITION RATE DROP

12-Aug-2013 00:02:06
A nutrition program in Mancha Ethiopia has shown that in the past three years, malnutrition rates have dropped from 20 percent to five percent and severe
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STORY: ETHIOPIA / MALNUTRITION RATE DROP
TRT: 2.06
SOURCE: UNICEF
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / LOCAL DIALECT / NATS

DATELINE: APRIL 2013 MANCHA, ETHIOPIA
SHOTLIST
1. Various shots, mothers with children being weighed in a tree
2. Wide shot, villagers sit in circle.
3. SOUNDBITE (Local Dialect) Wudnesh Zebdios Health Extension Worker
“I’m very pleased with the condition of the children who came today. It’s very good.”
Various, outdoor clinic
4. SOUNDBITE (Local language) Haile Bekele, Disease Prevention and Health Promotion Officer
“In the past the nutrition activities that were being implemented focused largely on treating malnutrition. Children would be treated after they became sick – that’s the work that was being done. But this programme is focusing on prevention for children before they get sick, before they become malnourished.”
5. Various shots, Wudnesh visits grandmother and granddaughter at hom
6. SOUNDBITE (Local Dialect) Kumete Alaro, Grandmother
“In the past we would take our milk and butter to the market. We used to sell the milk and butter in the market because we didn’t know its importance. Now we keep it and feed it to the children and they are benefitting.”
7. Various shots, Wudnesh inpsects sanitary facilities
8. Various shots, villagers dancing
STORYLINE
It’s weighing day for children in this village in southern Ethiopia. Once a month children two years and younger are checked for signs of malnutrition.

It’s part of the Ethiopian government’s Community Based Nutrition Programme supported by UNICEF and the European Union.

And it aims to catch signs of malnutrition early and also to educate families on how to prevent it.

The programme involves the entire community, which meets regularly to assess the health of their children.
SOUNDBITE (Local Dialect) Wudnesh Zebdios Health Extension Worker
“I’m very pleased with the condition of the children who came today. It’s very good.”

The programme is showing results. In this region in the past three years malnutrition rates have dropped from 20 per cent to five per cent and severe malnutrition is down from five per cent to around one per cent.
SOUNDBITE (Local Dialect) Haile Bekele, Disease Prevention and Health Promotion Officer

“In the past the nutrition activities that were being implemented focused largely on treating malnutrition. Children would be treated after they became sick – that’s the work that was being done. But this programme is focusing on prevention for children before they get sick, before they become malnourished.”

Home visits are also part of Wudnesh’s work. Today she visits Kumete Alaro whose granddaughter she treated for severe malnutrition one year ago.

SOUNDBITE (Local Dialect) Kumete Alaro, Grandmother
“In the past we would take our milk and butter to the market. We used to sell the milk and butter because we didn’t know its importance. Now we keep it and feed it to the children and they are benefitting.”

Improvements in water supply, hygiene and sanitation also helping to keep children and their families healthy and Wudnesh checks the facilities at Kumete’s home.

Outside, neighbours gather in a festive mood. This is a community where not too long ago you would always find severely malnourished children. The fact that there are none is cause for celebration.
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Geographic Subjects