NEW YORK / NUTRITION REPORT

15-Apr-2013 00:02:27
A new UNICEF report reveals the terrible toll that undernutrition takes on the world’s children. One in four under the age of five are stunted. And this stunting is disproportionate. Eighty percent of the world’s 165 million stunted children live in just 14 countries, mostly in sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia. UNICEF
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STORY: NEW YORK / NUTRITION REPORT
TRT: 2.27
SOURCE: UNICEF
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 2 APRIL 2013, NEW YORK CITY / FILE
SHOTLIST
1 OCTOBER 2012, BURKINA FASO

1. Medium shot, girl with bananas on head

21 MARCH 2013, GUATAMALA

2. Medium shot, woman scooping out food from pot

28 FEBRUARY 2013, NUSA TENGGARA BARAT PROVINCE, INDONESIA

3. Medium shot, two women feeding babies
4. Close up, baby eating

31 MAY 2012, DEDER, ETHIOPIA

5. Wide shot, man with woman putting baby on hanging scale
6. Close Up, scale

28 MARCH 2013, PHILIPPINES

7. Medium shot, woman measuring child's length

15 SEPTEMBER 2012, LAOS

8. Close up pan up from child's arm with arm measuring tape to profile

2 APRIL 2013, NEW YORK CITY

9. SOUNDBITE (English) Werner Schultink, UNICEF Chief of Nutrition:
“For example brain cells develop less well. There’ll be less of them, connectivity is less. That in turn leads to decreased school functioning it leads in turn to decreased performance in your work life, leading again to more poverty and you can imagine that if in a country almost half of kids or more than half of kids suffer from undernutrition what the enormous consequences would be.”

27 FEBRUARY 2013, NIGER

10. Medium shot, doctor weighs baby

8 JUNE 2012, NIGER

11. Medium shot, baby being fed from pink cup

12 FEBRUARY 2013, SOMALIA

12. Close up, child's arm measured

15 SEPTEMBER 2012, LAOS

13. Close Up of feet of child being measured

9 SEPTEMBER 2013, MALAWI

14. Medium shot, child placed on scale

15 SEPTEMBER 2012, LAOS

15. Medium shot, of mother and baby listening to nurse

28 FEBRUARY, 2013, NUSA TENGGARA BARAT PROVINCE, INDONESIA

16. Medium shot, mother breastfeeding baby
17. Close up, baby being breastfed

22 FEBRUARY 2012, DJORLA, CHAD

18. CU of child receiving immunization drops

16 FEBRUARY 2012, NEPAL

19. Close up, girl drinking water
20. Close up, profile of young girl

15 JUNE 2012, INDIA

21. Medium shot, newborn baby on mother’s lap
22. Close up, little girl

2 APRIL 2013, NEW YORK CITY

23. SOUNDBITE (English) Werner Schultink, UNICEF Chief of Nutrition
“And very importantly also we know that if you try to do too much after that very small window in the period of a life cycle, you’re too late.”

8 NOVEMBER 2013, SINDH PROVINCE, PAKISTAN

24. Close up, two little girls

1 OCTOBER 2012, BURKINA FASO

25. Wide shot, girl on bicycle with mother and baby.

2 APRIL 2013, NEW YORK CITY

26. SOUNDBITE (English) Werner Schultink, UNICEF Chief of Nutrition:
“If we want to achieve a world where there is better equity where there is less poverty and where we’re able to reduce poverty levels in a sustained manner we need to put people on the right track in life and the most fundamental thing to do that is by ensuring that there is good nutrition in the period of pregnancy and two years of age. In a way if you want, if you want to tackle poverty you need to tackle stunting.”

28 FEBRUARY 2013, NUSA TENGGARA BARAT PROVINCE, INDONESIA

27. Medium shot, mothers with babies
28. Medium shot, toddler eating

15 OCTOBER 2012, BANGLADESH

29. Medium shot, two women and toddler eating
STORYLINE
We all need food in order to live. But in order to reach our potential we need the right type of food and, even more importantly, we need it at the right time.

A new UNICEF report reveals the terrible toll that undernutrition takes on the world’s children.

One in four under the age of five are stunted.

Stunting’s a hidden epidemic with devastating consequences for entire societies.

SOUNDBITE (English) Werner Schultink, UNICEF Chief of Nutrition:
“For example brain cells develop less well. There’ll be less of them, connectivity is less. That in turn leads to decreased school functioning it leads in turn to decreased performance in your work life, leading again to more poverty and you can imagine that if in a country almost half of kids or more than half of kids suffer from undernutrition what the enormous consequences would be.”

The report shows that the burden of stunting is disproportionate. Eighty percent of the world’s 165 million stunted children live in just 14 countries, mostly in sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia.

Malnourished children can also grow up with increased risk of disease and of becoming obese.

Yet treating malnutrition is not complicated. Simple techniques such as encouraging mothers to exclusively breastfeed for six months, ensuring that children are immunized and have clean water and hygienic living conditions have worked in countries such as Nepal.

But timing is critical. And the window of opportunity is very small— from pregnancy to two years old.

SOUNDBITE (English) Werner Schultink, UNICEF Chief of Nutrition:
“And very importantly also we know that if you try to do too much after that very small window in the period of a life cycle, you’re too late.”

The report says that this new knowledge presents an unprecedented opportunity to make stunting a thing of the past.

SOUNDBITE (English) Werner Schultink, UNICEF Chief of Nutrition:
“If we want to achieve a world where there is better equity where there is less poverty and where we’re able to reduce poverty levels in a sustained manner we need to put people on the right track in life and the most fundamental thing to do that is by ensuring that there is good nutrition in the period of pregnancy and two years of age. In a way if you want, if you want to tackle poverty you need to tackle stunting.”
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