HAITI / QUAKE ANNIVERSARY

12-Jan-2013 00:04:02
More than 200,000 people lost their lives and 1.5 million were displaced when a catastrophic earthquake struck Haiti on 12 January 2010. Three years on, Haitians are continuing to rebuild their lives. UNDP
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STORY: HAITI / QUAKE ANNIVERSARY
TRT: 4.02
SOURCE: UNDP
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / FRENCH / NATS

DATELINE: 6 -8 DECEMBER 2012, PORT-AU-PRICE, BRAZIL
SHOTLIST
1. Various shots, reconstruction projects around the Haitian capital
2. Various shots, rehabilitation projects in Morne Hercule neighbourhood
3. SOUNDBITE (English) Marc-André Franche, Former Senior Country Director UNDP Haiti:
“You can see a lot of improvement. Not only has the debris been managed, 80 percent of debris has been managed, faster than any recorded disaster in history. And I think Haitians need to be proud of this. Rehabilitation of neighbourhoods has started. Quite a bit of investments are now visible in those neighbourhoods, in terms of water, sanitation, rehabilitation.”
4. Various shots, producing materials recycled from debris
5. SOUNDBITE (English) Marc-André Franche, Former Senior Country Director UNDP Haiti:
“People are the biggest wealth to rebuild their lives. They know what to do, they know what needs to be done and they’re the ones who can put the most energy in doing it.”
6. Various shots, neighbourhood council in Morne Hercule neighbourhood
7. SOUNDBITE (French) Marie-Josette Darius, Member of the Local Neighbourhood Council of Morne Hercule:
“There’s a representative for each area. There’s a women’s representative and a representative for grassroots groups. We did that to bring everyone together to identify the priority needs in the area. We had lots of problems after the earthquake, but some are, more urgent than others.”
8. Various shots, Neighbourhood Council of Morne Hercule
9. SOUNDBITE (French) Marie-Josette Darius, Member of the Local Neighbourhood Council of Morne Hercule:
“There are streetlights. Before women were being attacked in the neighbourhood. Now with the streetlights, it’s completely lit up everywhere.”
10. Various shots, construction projects
11. SOUNDBITE (English) Afke Bootsman, Project Director UNDP Haiti:
“Just the sheer location of the debris is a huge challenge. Port-au-Prince is on many mountains where no heavy machinery can come.”
12. Various of rehabilitation of corridor project in Carrefour-Feuilles neighbourhood
13. SOUNDBITE (English) Afke Bootsman, Project Director UNDP Haiti:
“The combination of community planning, debris removal, demolition, recycling, and bringing back those recycled products into the neighbourhoods at this scale is unprecedented.”
14. Various shots, using recycled building materials
15. SOUNDBITE (English) Marc-André Franche, Former Senior Country Director UNDP Haiti:
“The local economy has now started again. Jobs have been created in Port-au-Prince and outside. These are only a few examples where sure we’re not as far as we’d like to be but it gives us hope that, and it demonstrates that when the international community and government get together and provide the money and investments are made, change is possible.”
16. Various shots, managing debris
17. SOUNDBITE (French) Marie-Josette Darius, Member of the Local Neighbourhood Council of Morne Hercule:
“I never thought I’d see Morne Hercule like this. I though it was a dream. Before it was just muddy everywhere.”
18. Various shots, kids in Port-au-Prince.

STROYLINE:

At 4:53 in the afternoon on 12 January 2010, Haiti was hit by one of the most disastrous earthquakes in history. More than 200,000 people lost their lives and 1.5 million were displaced.

The capital suffered catastrophic damage, crippling government buildings and destroying millions of homes.

Three years later Haitians are continuing to rebuild their lives.

SOUNDBITE (English) Marc-André Franche, Former Senior Country Director UNDP Haiti:
“You can see a lot of improvement. Not only has the debris been managed, 80 percent of debris has been managed, faster than any recorded disaster in history. And I think Haitians need to be proud of this. Rehabilitation of neighbourhoods has started. Quite a bit of investments are now visible in those neighbourhoods, in terms of water, sanitation, rehabilitation.”

In many cases, it has been the people themselves who have taken matters into their own hands.

SOUNDBITE (English) Marc-André Franche, Former Senior Country Director UNDP Haiti:
“People are the biggest wealth to rebuild their lives. They know what to do, they know what needs to be done and they’re the ones who can put the most energy in doing it.”

The residents of Morne Hercule are recycling debris left from the earthquake to rehabilitate their neighbourhood.

Marie-Josette Darius is a 35 year old mother of two. She has recently been trained as a brick-maker and represents the women of her community at the local neighbourhood council.

SOUNDBITE (French) Marie-Josette Darius, Member of the Local Neighbourhood Council of Morne Hercule:
“There’s a representative for each area. There’s a women’s representative and a representative for grassroots groups. We did that to bring everyone together to identify the priority needs in the area. We had lots of problems after the earthquake, but some are, more urgent than others.”

With the help of the United Nations Development Programme, neighbourhood councils like these empower residents to prioritize issues and get access to resources.

SOUNDBITE (French) Marie-Josette Darius, Member of the Local Neighbourhood Council of Morne Hercule:
“There are streetlights. Before women were being attacked in the neighbourhood. Now with the streetlights, it’s completely lit up everywhere.”

In the neighbourhood of Carrefour-Feuilles, high in the hills of Port-au-Prince, UNDP supported a project to reconstruct and improve roads, alleyways, drainage systems, public spaces and build disaster-resistant homes, using recycled material.

SOUNDBITE (English) Afke Bootsman, Project Director UNDP Haiti:
“Just the sheer location of the debris is a huge challenge. Port-au-Prince is on many mountains where no heavy machinery can come. The combination of community planning, debris removal, demolition, recycling, and bringing back those recycled products into the neighbourhoods at this scale is unprecedented.”

The results can now be clearly seen.

SOUNDBITE (English) Marc-André Franche, Former Senior Country Director UNDP Haiti:
“The local economy has now started again. Jobs have been created in Port-au-Prince and outside. These are only a few examples where sure we’re not as far as we’d like to be but it gives us hope that, and it demonstrates that when the international community and government get together and provide the money and investments are made, change is possible.”

For people like Marie-Josette, these are welcome developments.

SOUNDBITE (French) Marie-Josette Darius, Member of the Local Neighbourhood Council of Morne Hercule:
“I never thought I’d see Morne Hercule like this. I though it was a dream. Before it was just muddy everywhere.”

Si
STORYLINE
TI / QUAKE ANNIVERSARY
TRT: 4.02
SOURCE: UNDP
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / FRENCH / NATS

DATELINE: 6 -8 DECEMBER 2012, PORT-AU-PRICE, BRAZIL

SHOTLIST:

1. Various shots, reconstruction projects around the Haitian capital
2. Various shots, rehabilitation projects in Morne Hercule neighbourhood
3. SOUNDBITE (English) Marc-André Franche, Former Senior Country Director UNDP Haiti:
“You can see a lot of improvement. Not only has the debris been managed, 80 percent of debris has been managed, faster than any recorded disaster in history. And I think Haitians need to be proud of this. Rehabilitation of neighbourhoods has started. Quite a bit of investments are now visible in those neighbourhoods, in terms of water, sanitation, rehabilitation.”
4. Various shots, producing materials recycled from debris
5. SOUNDBITE (English) Marc-André Franche, Former Senior Country Director UNDP Haiti:
“People are the biggest wealth to rebuild their lives. They know what to do, they know what needs to be done and they’re the ones who can put the most energy in doing it.”
6. Various shots, neighbourhood council in Morne Hercule neighbourhood
7. SOUNDBITE (French) Marie-Josette Darius, Member of the Local Neighbourhood Council of Morne Hercule:
“There’s a representative for each area. There’s a women’s representative and a representative for grassroots groups. We did that to bring everyone together to identify the priority needs in the area. We had lots of problems after the earthquake, but some are, more urgent than others.”
8. Various shots, Neighbourhood Council of Morne Hercule
9. SOUNDBITE (French) Marie-Josette Darius, Member of the Local Neighbourhood Council of Morne Hercule:
“There are streetlights. Before women were being attacked in the neighbourhood. Now with the streetlights, it’s completely lit up everywhere.”
10. Various shots, construction projects
11. SOUNDBITE (English) Afke Bootsman, Project Director UNDP Haiti:
“Just the sheer location of the debris is a huge challenge. Port-au-Prince is on many mountains where no heavy machinery can come.”
12. Various of rehabilitation of corridor project in Carrefour-Feuilles neighbourhood
13. SOUNDBITE (English) Afke Bootsman, Project Director UNDP Haiti:
“The combination of community planning, debris removal, demolition, recycling, and bringing back those recycled products into the neighbourhoods at this scale is unprecedented.”
14. Various shots, using recycled building materials
15. SOUNDBITE (English) Marc-André Franche, Former Senior Country Director UNDP Haiti:
“The local economy has now started again. Jobs have been created in Port-au-Prince and outside. These are only a few examples where sure we’re not as far as we’d like to be but it gives us hope that, and it demonstrates that when the international community and government get together and provide the money and investments are made, change is possible.”
16. Various shots, managing debris
17. SOUNDBITE (French) Marie-Josette Darius, Member of the Local Neighbourhood Council of Morne Hercule:
“I never thought I’d see Morne Hercule like this. I though it was a dream. Before it was just muddy everywhere.”
18. Various shots, kids in Port-au-Prince.

STROYLINE:

At 4:53 in the afternoon on 12 January 2010, Haiti was hit by one of the most disastrous earthquakes in history. More than 200,000 people lost their lives and 1.5 million were displaced.

The capital suffered catastrophic damage, crippling government buildings and destroying millions of homes.

Three years later Haitians are continuing to rebuild their lives.

SOUNDBITE (English) Marc-André Franche, Former Senior Country Director UNDP Haiti:
“You can see a lot of improvement. Not only has the debris been managed, 80 percent of debris has been managed, faster than any recorded disaster in history. And I think Haitians need to be proud of this. Rehabilitation of neighbourhoods has started. Quite a bit of investments are now visible in those neighbourhoods, in terms of water, sanitation, rehabilitation.”

In many cases, it has been the people themselves who have taken matters into their own hands.

SOUNDBITE (English) Marc-André Franche, Former Senior Country Director UNDP Haiti:
“People are the biggest wealth to rebuild their lives. They know what to do, they know what needs to be done and they’re the ones who can put the most energy in doing it.”

The residents of Morne Hercule are recycling debris left from the earthquake to rehabilitate their neighbourhood.

Marie-Josette Darius is a 35 year old mother of two. She has recently been trained as a brick-maker and represents the women of her community at the local neighbourhood council.

SOUNDBITE (French) Marie-Josette Darius, Member of the Local Neighbourhood Council of Morne Hercule:
“There’s a representative for each area. There’s a women’s representative and a representative for grassroots groups. We did that to bring everyone together to identify the priority needs in the area. We had lots of problems after the earthquake, but some are, more urgent than others.”

With the help of the United Nations Development Programme, neighbourhood councils like these empower residents to prioritize issues and get access to resources.

SOUNDBITE (French) Marie-Josette Darius, Member of the Local Neighbourhood Council of Morne Hercule:
“There are streetlights. Before women were being attacked in the neighbourhood. Now with the streetlights, it’s completely lit up everywhere.”

In the neighbourhood of Carrefour-Feuilles, high in the hills of Port-au-Prince, UNDP supported a project to reconstruct and improve roads, alleyways, drainage systems, public spaces and build disaster-resistant homes, using recycled material.

SOUNDBITE (English) Afke Bootsman, Project Director UNDP Haiti:
“Just the sheer location of the debris is a huge challenge. Port-au-Prince is on many mountains where no heavy machinery can come. The combination of community planning, debris removal, demolition, recycling, and bringing back those recycled products into the neighbourhoods at this scale is unprecedented.”

The results can now be clearly seen.

SOUNDBITE (English) Marc-André Franche, Former Senior Country Director UNDP Haiti:
“The local economy has now started again. Jobs have been created in Port-au-Prince and outside. These are only a few examples where sure we’re not as far as we’d like to be but it gives us hope that, and it demonstrates that when the international community and government get together and provide the money and investments are made, change is possible.”

For people like Marie-Josette, these are welcome developments.

SOUNDBITE (French) Marie-Josette Darius, Member of the Local Neighbourhood Council of Morne Hercule:
“I never thought I’d see Morne Hercule like this. I though it was a dream. Before it was just muddy everywhere.”

Since 2010, 1.2 million people have returned home, and 10 million cubic meters of rubble have been removed, enabling Haiti to transition from disaster to long-term development.
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