BRAZIL / RIO +20 PLENARY WRAP

21-Jun-2012 00:03:32
A flurry of activity continued today (21 June) in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, for the second day of the United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development (Rio+20), which seeks to shape new policies to promote global prosperity, reduce poverty and advance social equity and environmental protection. UNTV
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STORY: BRAZIL / RIO +20 PLENARY WRAP
TRT: 3.32
SOURCE: UNTV
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / SPANISH / NATS

DATELINE: 21 JUNE 2012, RIO DE JANEIRO, BRAZIL / RECENT
SHOTLIST
20 JUNE 2012, RIO DE JANEIRO, BRAZIL

1. Various shots, interior Rio+20 venue

21 JUNE 2012, RIO DE JANEIRO, BRAZIL

2. Wide shot, Rio + 20 venue
3. Wide shot, plenary
4. Med shot, conference vice-president
5. SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Evo Morales, President of Bolivia:
“The countries of the North enrich themselves in a predatory orgy of the natural sources of life. They force the countries from the South to be their poor park rangers. They intend to eliminate our sovereignty over our own natural resources, limiting and controlling our use for our own advantage. They want to create mechanisms of intrusion to elevate, monitor and judge our national policies. They pretend to judge and punish the use of our own natural resources with environmental discourses.”
6. Med shot, vice president
7. SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Rafael Correa, President of Ecuador:
“The group of the twenty richest nations got together in Mexico and probably eighty percent of those participants did not come to this summit. Perhaps for them it is not important, and will continue to be not so important as long as this power relationship doesn’t change. In the South we can call upon a global conscience, but I think that our level of incidence it is still small. The hope is that the citizens of the North, who are also victims of the system which works for the capitals, not for human beings, will be the ones to rebel and change this power relation.”
8. Zoom out, audience applause
9. SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Juan Manuel Santos Calderón, President of Colombia:
“There is a will to achieve a model of coherent development with our social and economic interests. The magnitude of the goals will be the test that the time for diagnosis and discussions is over and hopefully the moment of pursuing and achieving concrete objectives has come. The option of the sustainable development goals demonstrates that we did not meet in vain. The legacy of Rio is alive. It must always remain alive in benefit of this generation and mostly of the generations to come.”
9. Wide shot, conference

10. Wide shot, luncheon in honour of heads of state and government hosted by the President of Brazil
11. SOUNDBITE (English) Ban Ki-moon, United Nations Secretary-General:
“The outcome document which leaders will adopt tomorrow afternoon is a very solid, concrete, ambitious and good one, providing a firm foundation for building a sustainable future. And the commitment we will announce are the bricks and cement that we can build it with, billions of dollars worth of pledge and partnership. I congratulate the leaders present here for your strong commitment, and I highly commend President Rousseff for her leadership.”
12. Wide shot, luncheon
STORYLINE
A flurry of activity continued today (21 June) in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, for the second day of the United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development (Rio+20), which seeks to shape new policies to promote global prosperity, reduce poverty and advance social equity and environmental protection.

President Evo Morales of Bolivia, who has pioneered an alternative path to sustainable development, was highly critical of the path proposed by industrialized nations.

In his speech to the plenary, Morales accused the “countries of the North” of forcing “the countries from the South to be their poor park rangers.”

He said that developed countries “intend to eliminate our sovereignty over our own natural resources, limiting and controlling our use for our own advantage” and “intend to judge and punish the use of our own natural resources with environmental discourses.”

In a similar tone President Rafael Correa of Ecuador pointed out that “probably 80 percent” of the leaders of the G-20 nations that met earlier in the week in Los Cabos, Mexico, did not attend this meeting.

He said that “perhaps for them it is not important, and will continue to be not so important as long as this power relationship doesn’t change.”

Another South American President, Juan Manuel Santos Calderón of Colombia, in a more conciliatory tone commended the outcome document of Rio + 20 and said that there was “a will to achieve a model of coherent development with our social and economic interests.”

He added that “the magnitude of the goals will be the test that the time for diagnosis and discussions is over and hopefully the moment of pursuing and achieving concrete objectives has come.”

Speaking at a luncheon for heads of state hosted by Brazil’s President Dilma Rousseff earlier in the day, UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon praised the assembled leaders for agreeing on an “ambitious” outcome document to Rio+20, to be adopted when the conference closes tomorrow.

He said the outcome document provided a “firm foundation for building a sustainable future” and welcomed “billions of dollars” worth of pledges.

More than 100 heads of state and government are gathered in Rio for the three-day summit known as Rio+20, which seeks to shape new policies to promote global prosperity, reduce poverty and advance social equity and environmental protection.

Rio+20’s outcome document, entitled “The Future We Want,” calls for a wide range of actions, including on establishing new sustainable development goals, the green economy and corporate sustainability.

In addition to the outcome document, there have been nearly 500 voluntary commitments on sustainable development activities by civil society groups, businesses, governments and universities.
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