UN / HAITI SEISMOLOGY

18-Apr-2011 00:02:43
Eric Calais, UN Development Programme's (UNDP) earthquake expert in Haiti, said that if plans are properly implemented, the country has the opportunity of being "the champion of earthquake safe reconstruction" and could be a model for other developing nations. UNTV / FILE
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STORY: UN / HAITI SEISMOLOGY
SOURCE: UNTV/ WORLD BANK
TRT: 2.43
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH/ NATS

DATELINE: 18 APRIL 2011, NEW YORK CITY/ FILE
SHOTLIST
FILE – RECENT, NEW YORK CITY

1. Wide shot, exterior UN building

18 APRIL 2011, NEW YORK CITY

2. Wide shot, dais
3. Wide shot, audience
4. SOUNDBITE (English) Eric Calais, United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) Seismologist in Haiti:
“We expect, unfortunately, more earthquakes. Now, the good news though is that we know what to do about it, as scientists and engineers. If one cannot predict when or where these events will happen, one can determine how large they might be and one can put in place mitigation measures.”
5. Med shot, reporter
6. SOUNDBITE (English) Eric Calais, United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) Seismologist in Haiti:
“As you all know there’s been a number of criticisms about the lack of progress rebuilding Port-au-Prince and Haiti as a whole and clearly if one visits Haiti, Port-au-Prince today, fifteen months after the earthquake, it doesn’t look like a city bustling with reconstruction projects, with cranes all over the place, bulldozers and so on and so forth.”
7. Med shot, dais
8. SOUNDBITE (English) Eric Calais, United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) Seismologist in Haiti:
“One cannot rebuild a city susceptible to earthquakes without knowing the type of ground one is building on. So this is what this set of maps is achieving and it is really a milestone because thanks to this project Haiti will be able to rebuild its capital and the metropolitan area in a much more earthquake resilient way.”
9. Med shot, reporter
10. SOUNDBITE (English) Eric Calais, United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) Seismologist in Haiti:
“The technical solutions are known, there’s nothing to invent, it is prevention, prevention, prevention, and we know what to do. The difficulty is implementing these measures on the ground. Port-au-Prince has the opportunity of rebuilding in a way that will not only be economically and socially viable, but also in a way that, such a way that it will not collapse, it would be the fourth time if it did, in the next earthquake. And, truly Haiti has the opportunity here of being the champion of earthquake-safe reconstruction and could be a model in many ways for other developing nations.”

FILE – WORLD BANK - NOVEMBER 2010, PORT-AU-PRINCE, HAITI

11. Pan left rubble
12. Med shot, home owner talking to engineer
13. Med shot, engineers inspecting house
14. Med shot, engineer, spray painting green tag
15. Med shot, engineer analyzing map data
16. Pan left, damaged homes

FILE – WORLD BANK - 24 JUNE 2010, PORT-AU-PRINCE, HAITI

17. Close up, cracks on the road caused by earthquake
18. Various shots, UN trucks working on the road
19. Various shots, Haitian workers fixing the road and sealing cracks
STORYLINE
Fifteen months after the 12 January 2010 earthquake devastated Port-au-Prince, the top United Nations (UN) earthquake expert in Haiti briefed journalists in New York on best practices to reduce risks from future seismic events.

Eric Calais, a geophysicist working with the UN Development Programme (UNDP) in Haiti explained that the island sits on the Enriquillo-Plantain Garden fault line and more earthquakes are “unfortunately” expected in the future.

He said that “the good news” is that although “one cannot predict when or where these events will happen”, scientists and engineers posses the knowledge to put in place mitigation measures.

Calais acknowledged that rebuilding has been lagging and Port-au-Prince “doesn’t look like a city bustling with reconstruction projects, with cranes all over the place, bulldozers and so on and so forth.”

He pointed out that “one cannot rebuild a city susceptible to earthquakes without knowing the type of ground one is building on” and said that seismic microzonation maps have been elaborated for that purpose.

The UNDP seismologist called this a “milestone” as it will allow Haiti “to rebuild its capital and the metropolitan area in a much more earthquake resilient way.”

He emphasised that the technical solutions are well known, and “there’s nothing to invent, it is prevention, prevention, prevention, and we know what to do.”

He added that if plans are properly implemented, the country has the opportunity of being "the champion of earthquake safe reconstruction" and could be a model for other developing nations.

With a magnitude of 7.0 on the Richter scale, the earthquake killed over 200,000 people, injured more than 300,000 and displaced 2.3 million people, nearly one quarter of the country’s population. It levelled Haiti’s capital, delivered a severe blow to the economy and infrastructure, and impeded nation-building efforts in the country.

In addition, 102 UN staff members perished, constituting the highest loss of life from a single event in UN history.
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