TANZANIA / SCHOOLS UNDER TREES

11-Jan-2018 00:01:33
Throughout the refugee camps in Tanzania, children attend classes in the open, due to a shortfall of funds. When it rains, or is too windy, school is cancelled. UNHCR
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STORY: TANZANIA / SCHOOLS UNDER TREES
TRT: 1:33
SOURCE: UNHCR
RESTRICTIONS: PLEASE CREDIT UNHCR ON SCREEN
LANGUAGE: KIRUNDI /KISWAHILI /ENGLISH /NATS

DATELINE: NOVEMBER 2017, NYARUGUSU CAMP / NDUTA CAMP, TANZANIA
SHOTLIST
NOVEMBER 2017, NDUTA CAMP, TANZANIA

1. Tilt down, treetops to children in class
2. Various shots, children in class singing
3. SOUNDBITE (Kirundi) Hafash Imana Euphrasie, Burundian refugee and primary school student:
“When it rains or if it is windy, branches can fall off the trees and we have to stop the class, so the teacher can take the injured students to the health clinic.”
4. Various shots, Hafash in class
5. SOUNDBITE (Kirundi) Hafash Imana Euphrasie, Burundian refugee and primary school student:
“When I finish all my studies I want to become a teacher, so I can help other children.”
6. Wide shot, children in class
7. Med shot, children in class
8. SOUNDBITE (English) James Onynango, Education Officer, UNHCR:
“We need more money. Construction of the classroom pretty much translates to we need money to put the classrooms there.”

NOVEMBER 2017, NYARUGUSU CAMP / NDUTA CAMP, TANZANIA

9. Various shots, secondary school class in tented classroom
10. SOUNDBITE (Kiswahili) Ndayininahaze Marie Goreth, Burundian refugee and secondary school student:
“Children leave school because their parents can not support them, so they decide to leave school and try to earn money to make a living.”
11. Tracking shot, child carrying firewood
STORYLINE
Throughout the refugee camps in Tanzania, children attend classes in the open, due to a shortfall of funds. When it rains, or is too windy, school is cancelled.

The poor conditions mean that thousands of students have dropped out, with only 75% of primary aged school children attending classes.

SOUNDBITE (Kiswahili) Hafash Imana Euphrasie, Burundian refugee and primary school student:
“When it rains or if it is windy, branches can fall off the trees and we have to stop the class, so the teacher can take the injured students to the health clinic.”

Furaha (“joy”) school is one of nine primary schools in Tanzania’s Nduta camp, where a quarter of children aged between six and 14 do not attend school. Little Hafash, however, has high hopes for his future.

SOUNDBITE (Kiswahili) Hafash Imana Euphrasie, Burundian refugee and primary school student:
“When I finish all my studies I want to become a teacher, so I can help other children.”

Fifty-five per cent of the camp population are under the age of 17 and there is just one secondary school with an enrolment rate of just eight per cent. Empty stomachs, an often-exhausting trek to school and no diplomas mean that many teenagers opt out.

James Onynango an education officer at the UN refugee agency (UNHCR) said the situation is “unacceptable.”

SOUNDBITE (English) James Onynango, Education Officer, UNHCR:
“We need more money. Construction of the classroom pretty much translates to we need money to put the classrooms there.”

Enrolment in Nyarugusu camp is higher, topping 80 per cent at primary level, although several schools there still lack permanent buildings and learning materials. Many children learn in flimsy tents that collapse in the wind and bake in the midday sun.

Other circumstances also contribute to students dropping out, such as poverty and early pregnancy among schoolgirls.

SOUNDBITE (Kiswahili) Ndayininahaze Marie Goreth, Burundian refugee and secondary school student:
“Children leave school because their parents cannot support them, so they decide to leave school and try to earn money to make a living.”

A huge funding shortfall means that UNHCR and its partners have been able to build only 137 classrooms in Tanzania’s three refugee camps between 2016 and April this year. More than 70 per cent of students in the Nduta, Nyarugusu and Mtendeli refugee camps have to study outdoors, with just 193 permanent classrooms for about 9,600 children. A high student-teacher ratio adds to the difficulties.

About 638 additional classrooms need to be built across all three camps, but funding is a serious problem. The Regional Refugee Response Plan to assist Burundian refugees in Tanzania is grossly underfunded, with just 25 per cent of funding received.

The challenges faced by students in Nduta and Nyarugusu camps are unfortunately all too common for child refugees worldwide. While globally, 91 per cent of children attend primary school, for refugees, that figure is far lower at only 61 per cent – and in low-income countries it is less than 50 per cent, according to a recent UNHCR report called “Left Behind: Refugee Education in Crisis.”

As refugee children get older, the obstacles increase: only 23 per cent of refugee adolescents are enrolled in secondary school, compared to 84 per cent globally. In low-income countries, a mere 9 per cent of refugees are able to go to secondary school, the study found.
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