GENEVA / WORLD AIDS DAY

01-Dec-2017 00:01:53
On World Aids Day today, UNAIDS released a new report called “Blind spot” that shows the difficulties in reaching men with HIV services. UNAIDS warns that men are less likely to access HIV treatment and more likely to die of AIDS-related illnesses. UNTV CH
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STORY: GENEVA / WORLD AIDS DAY
TRT: 1:53
SOURCE: UNTV CH
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 1 DECEMBER 2017 GENEVA, SWITZERLAND
SHOTLIST
1. Wide shot, exterior, Palais des Nations
2. Wide shot, Press Room
3. SOUNDBITE (English) Peter Ghys, Chief Strategy Officer, UNAIDS:
“Men compared to women are just less likely to take up services and so we see that in the proportion of men that are taking a test for HIV and also the proportion of men living with HIV that actually know that they are infected they are just less aware of their status than women are. We estimate about 20 % less likely to know their status compared to women”.
4. Med shot, journalists
5. SOUNDBITE (English) Peter Ghys, Chief Strategy Officer, UNAIDS:
“As it comes to the coverage of treatment, again we see there is a discrepancy where men are having or are on treatment only 7 % of men living with HIV while that proportion is about 60 % for women. Again men are doing less well than women are”.
6. Med shot, journalists
7. SOUNDBITE (English) Peter Ghys, Chief Strategy Officer, UNAIDS:
“Once people are on treatment we find that men are actually less likely to be fully observant or adherent to their treatment and so it results actually in higher morality of men living with HIV than women living with HIV, and so about 58 % of all the Aids related deaths that were observed in 2016 are occurring among men, although there are more women living with HIV”.
8. Med shot, journalists
9. SOUNDBITE (English) Peter Ghys, Chief Strategy Officer, UNAIDS:
“There is also recently use of technology where you can have applications on your smartphone that encourage you to take an HIV test but also show you where is the nearest place where you can have such a test”.
10. Wide shot, press briefing room
STORYLINE
On World Aids Day today, UNAIDS released a new report called “Blind spot” that shows the difficulties in reaching men with HIV services. UNAIDS warns that men are less likely to access HIV treatment and more likely to die of AIDS-related illnesses.

Talking to the media in Geneva Friday (1 Dec), Peter Ghys, Chief Strategy Officer of UNAIDS said that “men compared to women are just less likely to take up services and so we see that in the proportion of men that are taking a test for HIV and also the proportion of men living with HIV that actually know that they are infected they are just less aware of their status than women are. We estimate about 20 % are less likely to know their status compared to women”.

According to the “Blind spot” globally less than half of men living with HIV are on treatment, compared to 60 % of women.

Ghys said that “as it comes to the coverage of treatment, again we see there is a discrepancy where men are having or are on treatment. Only 7 % of men living with HIV while that proportion is about 60 % for women. Again men are doing less well than women are”.

The report reveals that in sub-Saharan Africa, men and boys living with HIV are 20% less likely than women and girls living with HIV to know their HIV status, and 27 % less likely to be accessing treatment.

UNAIDS Strategic Officer Ghys said that “once people are on treatment we find that men are actually less likely to be fully observant or adherent to their treatment and so it results actually in higher morality of men living with HIV than women living with HIV, and so about 58 % of all the Aids related deaths that were observed in 2016 are occurring among men, although there are more women living with HIV”.

The “Blind spot” also shows that HIV prevalence is consistently higher among men within key populations. Outside of eastern and southern Africa, 60 % of all new HIV infections among adults are among men. The report outlines the particular difficulties men in key populations such as gay communities, detainees or drug users face in accessing HIV services, including discrimination, harassment and denial of health services.

The report highlights that men who have sex with men are 24 times more likely to acquire HIV than men in the general population and in over two dozen countries HIV prevalence among men who have sex with men is 15 % higher.

The report urges HIV programmes to boost men’s use of health services and to make services more easily available to men. Ghys said that “there is also recently use of technology where you can have applications on your smart phone that encourage you to take an HIV test but also show you where is the nearest place where you can have such a test”.

As of June 2016 UNAIDS estimates that 36,7 million people globally were living with HIV and that 1 million people died from AIDS-related illnesses. Around 21 million people were accessing anti-retroviral therapy.
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