GENEVA / GLOBAL HUMANITARIAN APPEAL

01-Dec-2017 00:03:23
The United Nations (UN) launched a record annual humanitarian appeal of USD 22.5 billion to donors aiming to reach the needs of 91 million people with assistance in 2018. UNTV CH
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STORY: GENEVA / GLOBAL HUMANITARIAN APPEAL
TRT: 3:23
SOURCE: UNTV CH
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 1 DECEMBER 2017, GENEVA, SWITZERLAND
SHOTLIST
1. Exterior, Palais des Nations with snow
2. Med shot, podium Press Room
3. Close up, Brochure “Global Humanitarian Overview”
4. SOUNDBITE (English) Mark Lowcock, Under-Secretary-General for Humanitarian Affairs and Emergency Relief Coordinator, United Nations:
“Our projection is that in 2018, 136 million people across the planet will be in need of humanitarian assistance. That is about 5 per cent higher than the projection we made this time last year.”
5. Close up, journalist
6. SOUNDBITE (English) Mark Lowcock, Under-Secretary-General for Humanitarian Affairs and Emergency Relief Coordinator, United Nations:
“The big drivers of humanitarian need for 2018 will continue to be conflict and violence, which forces people to flee from their homes, deny some access to adequate food, and robs them of their livelihoods. There will also be, we expect in 2018 the regular occurrence of natural disasters, typhoons and hurricanes and other natural disaster events, some scientists in fact think that 2018 might see a risk of a slightly large number of earthquakes.”
7. Wide shot, journalists
8. SOUNDBITE (English) SOUNDBITE (English) Mark Lowcock, Under-Secretary-General for Humanitarian Affairs and Emergency Relief Coordinator, United Nations:
“In many of these crisis, aid workers put their own lives at risk in order to help others. And this year alone 171 aid workers have been killed, wounded or kidnapped while carrying out their work. And just this week we saw another horrific example of this with 45 people including a number of NGO workers killed in a single incident in Jonglei in South Sudan.”
9. Med shot, cameraman
10. SOUNDBITE (English) SOUNDBITE (English) Mark Lowcock, Under-Secretary-General for Humanitarian Affairs and Emergency Relief Coordinator, United Nations:
“The largest humanitarian crisis that we are concerned about in the world at the moment is the crisis in Yemen. Yemen has a population of 25 million people, 20 million of them need assistance and something like seven or eight million of them are right now, right on the brink of famine. And this you know, we have been calling for a full unwinding of the blockade which has been preventing humanitarian assistance and commercial food and fuel get into Yemen since the measures were put in place after the attack, the missile attack on Riyadh on 6 November.”
11. Wide shot, journalists
12. SOUNDBITE (English) Helle Thorning-Schmidt, CEO of Save the Children International:
“We have the number of hungry children in the world is going up again, not down and we are seeing tremendous suffering in some of the worst places, for example in Yemen, which we just talked about, where we are seeing that children are dying from diseases that were overcome in many places over hundred years ago, we are talking about cholera and in Yemen we have a situation where more than hundred children die every day. I think our figures is 130. So that is a very serious crisis.”
13. Close up, journalist
14. SOUNDBITE (English) Helle Thorning-Schmidt, CEO of Save the Children International:
“We have to be very very grateful to the donors who are stepping up in this very difficult situation. We have never had as much funding as we have right now available to us to help people and that surely is a very very good thing. And we hope that we can continue that in 2018, of course.”
15. Wide shot, journalists
STORYLINE
The United Nations (UN) launched a record annual humanitarian appeal of USD 22.5 billion to donors aiming to reach the needs of 91 million people with assistance in 2018.

Speaking to journalists in Geneva today (01 Dec), Mark Lowcock, UN Under-Secretary General for Humanitarian Affairs and Emergency Relief Coordinator said that “our projection is that in 2018, 136 million people across the planet will be in need of humanitarian assistance. That is about 5 per cent higher than the projection we made this time last year.”

Some 136 million people across the world need humanitarian aid and protection due to protracted conflicts, natural disasters, epidemics and displacement.

Lowcock said “the big drivers of humanitarian need for 2018 will continue to be conflict and violence which forces people to flee from their homes, deny some access to adequate food, and robs them of their livelihoods.”

He added “there will also be, we expect in 2018 the regular occurrence of natural disasters, typhoons and hurricanes and other natural disaster events, some scientists in fact think that 2018 might see a risk of a slightly large number of earthquakes.”

In 2017, humanitarian agencies reached tens of millions of people in need, saving millions of lives, and donors provided record levels of funding to the Humanitarian Response Plans - nearly USD 13 billion by the end of November 2017.

On aid workers, the Lowcock said “in many of these crisis, aid workers put their own lives at risk in order to help others,” adding that in 2017 alone, “171 aid workers have been killed, wounded or kidnapped while carrying out their work. And just this week we saw another horrific example of this with 45 people including a number of NGO workers killed in a single incident in Jonglei in South Sudan.”

The needs will remain at exceptionally high levels in Nigeria, South Sudan, the Syrian region and Yemen said the UN global humanitarian document.

Lowcock also expressed concern over “the largest humanitarian crisis” in Yemen.

He said "Yemen has a population of 25 million people, 20 million of them need assistance,” warning that about seven or eight million of them are right on the brink of famine.

He said “we have been calling for a full unwinding of the blockade which has been preventing humanitarian assistance and commercial food and fuel get into Yemen since the measures were put in place after the attack, the missile attack on Riyadh, on 6 November.”

Helle Thorning-Schmidt, CEO of Save the Children International said that the number of hungry children in the world is going up again, adding that “we are seeing tremendous suffering in some of the worst places, for example in Yemen which we just talked about where we are seeing that children are dying from diseases that were overcome in many places over hundred years ago, we are talking about cholera and in Yemen we have a situation where more than hundred children die every day. I think our figures is 130. So that is a very serious crisis.”

The wars in Syria and Yemen will take up nearly half of the 22.5 billion dollars that the UN plan to spend on food, shelter and other aid for humanitarian crises next year.

Thorning-Schmid said “we have to be very very grateful to the donors who are stepping up in this very difficult situation."

She added "we have never had as much funding as we have right now available to us to help people and that surely is a very very good thing. And we hope that we can continue that in 2018, of course.”
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