GENEVA / LETHAL AUTONOMOUS WEAPONS

13-Nov-2017 00:02:13
The first-ever formal inter-governmental discussion on what machine autonomy means for the laws of armed conflict and the future of international security started Monday at the United Nations in Geneva. UNTV CH
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STORY: GENEVA / LETHAL AUTONOMOUS WEAPONS
TRT: 2:16
SOURCE: UNTV CH
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS
DATELINE: 13 NOVEMBER 2017, GENEVA, SWITZERLAND
SHOTLIST
1. Exterior, Palais des Nations
2. Wide shot, meeting room
3. SOUNDBITE (English) Ambassador Amandeep Gill, Permanent Representative of India to the Conference on Disarmament, Chair of the Group of Governmental Experts on Lethal Autonomous Weapon Systems:
”This is a significant occasion as we embark on the formal consideration of emerging technologies in the field of lethal autonomous weapon systems in the context of the objectives and the purposes of the convention.”
4. Med shot, podium
5. SOUNDBITE (English) Anja Kaspersen, Director Office for Disarmament Affairs:
“It is my hope that this first round of formal deliberations will provide an opportunity for States to further build understanding, exchange views and explore areas of normative convergence. I send my best wishes for a successful meeting.”
6. Med shot, Indian and Iceland delegates
7. SOUNDBITE (English) Ambassador Amandeep Gill, Permanent Representative of India to the Conference on Disarmament, Chair of the Group of Governmental Experts on Lethal Autonomous Weapon Systems:
“The use of technology to wage war is nothing new. Every technological revolution from gun powder to stem ships to nuclear fusion and rocketry has given rise to new challenges for international security - arms control and disarmament. What is perhaps different this time is the prospect of loosing human control, however imperfect and unwise it has been historically over the waging of war to machines.”
8. Close up, delegate
9. SOUNDBITE (English) Ambassador Amandeep Gill, Permanent Representative of India to the Conference on Disarmament, Chair of the Group of Governmental Experts on Lethal Autonomous Weapon Systems:
“It is timely therefore that the CCW, a unique framework convention that strives for a balance between military necessity and the humanitarian imperative, has started a formal and regular consideration of issues related to emerging technologies relevant to laws. The CCW’s flexibility and its deep roots in international humanitarian law make it ideally suited to tackle the legal, military and humanitarian issues are rising out of the potential development proliferation and use of lethal autonomous weapon systems.”
10. Various shots, meeting
STORYLINE
The first-ever formal inter-governmental discussion on what machine autonomy means for the laws of armed conflict and the future of international security started today (13 Nov) at the United Nations in Geneva.

Chaired by Ambassador Amandeep Singh Gill of India, a Group of Governmental Experts (GGE) on Lethal Autonomous Weapons Systems (LAWS) is examining emerging technologies in the area of lethal autonomous weapons systems, also known as the “Inhumane Weapons Convention.”

During his opening speech Ambassador Gill said that "this is a significant occasion as we embark on the formal consideration of emerging technologies in the field of lethal autonomous weapon systems in the context of the objectives and the purposes of the convention”.

A wide array of stakeholders, including many of the 125 High Contracting Parties to the Convention on Certain Conventional Weapons (CCW), as well as representatives of international organizations, non-governmental organizations, academia, industry and civil society are participating in the meeting till 17 November.

Anja Kaspersen, Director Office for Disarmament Affairs at the UN in Geneva said in her introduction that “it is my hope that this first round of formal deliberations will provide an opportunity for States to further build understanding, exchange views and explore areas of normative convergence. I send my best wishes for a successful meeting”.

The meeting will bring together this diverse group to allow for an exchange of views and expertise on this multi-faceted issue. It is expected that the GGE will consider LAWS from various angles, including technological, military, ethical and legal dimensions. New and evolving artificial intelligence (AI) technologies are challenging existing international norms of what is acceptable in warfare, according to Ambassador Amandeep Gill of India.

"The use of technology to wage war is nothing new. Every technological revolution from gun powder to stem ships to nuclear fusion and rocketry has given rise to new challenges for international security - arms control and disarmament", Ambassador Gill said. "What is perhaps different this time is the prospect of loosing human control, however imperfect and unwise it has been historically over the waging of war to machines”, he added.

"It is timely therefore that the CCW, a unique framework convention that strives for a balance between military necessity and the humanitarian imperative, has started a formal and regular consideration of issues related to emerging technologies relevant to laws. The CCW’s flexibility and its deep roots in international humanitarian law make it ideally suited to tackle the legal, military and humanitarian issues are rising out of the potential development proliferation and use of lethal autonomous weapon systems.”

The discussion will build on three informal meetings of experts on the topic, held under the auspices of the CCW in 2014, 2015 and 2016.
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