GENEVA / MICROSOFT

09-Nov-2017 00:03:48
Cybercrime is becoming such a huge threat to society that nothing less than a “Digital Geneva Convention” for the world is needed, the President of tech giant Microsoft said at the UN on Thursday. UNTV CH
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STORY: GENEVA / MICROSOFT
TRT: 03:48
SOURCE: UNTV CH
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 09 NOVEMBER 2017, GENEVA, SWITZERLAND / RECENT
SHOTLIST
RECENT, GENEVA, SWITZERLAND

1. Wide shot, exterior Palais des Nations at night

09 NOVEMBER 2017, GENEVA, SWITZERLAND

2. Wide shot, Brad Smith on stage at UN Geneva
3. SOUNDBITE (English) Brad Smith, Microsoft President and Chief Legal Officer:
“In the world today technology companies are the first responders in cyberspace and just like the medics they work for military on the battlefield. I think that we need to be neutrals, we need to help everyone, we need help everyone who is impacted or injured or hurt and we need to be protected from retaliation by governments when we do help everyone.”
4. Med shot, Brad Smith on stage at UN Geneva
5. SOUNDBITE (English) Brad Smith, Microsoft President and Chief Legal Officer:
“One of the things one needs to do in cyber space is identify who is engaging in cyber-attacks. Well, that is something that the International Atomic Energy Commission does every day every day, every year. It is a model that we can consider, and people can decide should it be part of the United Nations, should it be a non-governmental organisation, how should it work. I think there is lots of room for people to come together and to compare what they think would be best. What I think is interesting it’s the kind of model we can learn from and therefore an example on which we can build.”
6. Wide shot, Brad Smith on stage at UN Geneva
7. SOUNDBITE (English) Brad Smith, Microsoft President and Chief Legal Officer:
“This is the kind of settle project that will unfold over a series of years. I wish it would unfold over weeks or months, but it is bigger than that. I do believe that the tech sector has the opportunity in 2018 to come together and adapt what we call the ‘Tech Sector accord’ that would pledge us to work together and be principled in protecting people. If we can do that in 2018, I think we would create the foundation for a faster momentum by governments. We could see governments taking more steps in 2018, 2019 and beyond. Ultimately, all of this is one of the issues of our generation, of our lives, it is something that to some degree it is likely to occupy our work globally as an international community over the next decade. If you look at the history of arms controlled negotiations - and this really is in some ways an arms control negotiation – they usually take the better part of a decade and we may need to be prepared to work that way every year.”
8. Med shot, focus pool
9. SOUNDBITE (English) Brad Smith, Microsoft President and Chief Legal Officer:
“We believe the world needs to adopt a ‘Digital Geneva Convention’. In effect, to create the rules, the law from the 21century that will ensure that countries, nations, governments don’t use cyber weapons to attack people. We need to have rules in place that will ensure that they don’t attack hospitals, they don’t attack the electrical grid, they don’t attack the electoral processes in our countries. And we are not going to get there unless we build on the law that exists already, recognise where it applies but then fill in the gaps and add to it a ‘Digital Geneva Convention’, we do just that.”
10. Wide shot, Brad Smith on stage at UN Geneva
11. SOUNDBITE (English) Brad Smith, Microsoft President and Chief Legal Officer:
“We are seeing cybercrime unfortunately grow very substantially. We saw it grow on a single day, the 12 May with the WannaCry attack. That single attack affected over 200,000 computers in over 150 countries. But unfortunately, that was just one day, that was the worst day of the year, but it was only one day of the year. Estimates are now saying that cybercrime is costing the global economy 70 billion dollars a year. Companies around the world are being hacked or attacked every day. No one has the precise number, in part because companies don’t always want to admit it, but unfortunately it has become a very common problem.”
12. Med shot, UN dignitaries
13. Wide shot, UN Assembly Hall in Geneva
14. Wide shot, UN Assembly Hall with camera man
STORYLINE
Cybercrime is becoming such a huge threat to society that nothing less than a “Digital Geneva Convention” for the world is needed, the President of tech giant Microsoft said at the UN on Thursday.

Microsoft President and Chief Legal Officer Brad Smith delivered today at the UN Palais in Geneva a keynote address on the current Internet governance challenges at the 2017 edition of the Geneva Lecture Series (GLS).

Brad Smith discussed various aspects of internet governance and the proposed Digital Geneva Convention. According to Smith, the issue has become “a very common problem”, which is why a new international tech accord is needed that takes its inspiration from the four existing Geneva Conventions. Their purpose is to protect soldiers and civilians from war.

The Microsoft executive explained the significance of the so-called “WannaCry” attack in May that had damaged hundreds of thousands of PCs around the world.

That malicious campaign had involved “cyberweapons” created in one State that were used by another.

It had been foiled “almost by coincidence” by a computer scientist in the UK, Smith said, adding that the fact that it had brought down hospital IT systems showed how real the threat to people has become.

“Here was a single attack that impacted over 200,000 computers in over 150 countries around the world. What that shows is we have clearly entered a new era of invisible weapons, of cyber warfare. We need new rules to regulate it.”

Annually, hacking is reckoned to cost global business US$ 70 billion a year, Smith said, and companies around the world “are being attacked every day.”

“We’re calling for the creation of a Digital Geneva Convention to really put in place new rules internationally that would require nation states or governments to refrain from attacking civilians from the private sector, from attacking hospitals, or the electrical grid, for example. We believe that a Digital Geneva Convention is needed because we see the cybersecurity situation in the world getting more challenging and we see more governments and nations engaging in these attacks.”

As part of the proposed “Geneva Digital Convention”, Smith said he wanted the computer industry’s major players to agree to a series of measures.

Likening the computer industry to army medics working on the battlefield, the Microsoft executive said that technology companies should be viewed as “neutral first-responders” to cyberspace threats.

“We need to be neutrals, we need to help everyone, we need to help everyone who is impacted or injured or hurt. And we need to be protected from retaliation from governments when we do help everyone. That in essence is what the world has had for over 150 years in battle on the land or in the air or on the sea. Now we need it for technology companies in cyberspace.”
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