GENEVA / SYRIA EGELAND

09-Nov-2017 00:03:16
The Syrian enclave of eastern Ghouta faces a “complete catastrophe” for the 400,000 civilians that are besieged due to the blockage of aid deliveries, UN humanitarian advisor Jan Egeland told the media today in Geneva. UNTV CH
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STORY: GENEVA / SYRIA EGELAND
TRT: 3:16
SOURCE: UNTV CH
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 09 NOVEMBER 2017 GENEVA, SWITZERLAND
SHOTLIST
1. Exterior, Palais des Nations
2. Wide shot, press briefing room
3. Medium shot, Egeland at podium
4. SOUNDBITE (English) Jan Egeland, Humanitarian Advisor to the Special Envoy for Syria, United Nations:
“This epicenter of suffering has 400, 000 civilians - men, women and children in a dozen besieged towns and villages.”
5. Wide shot, journalists
6. SOUNDBITE (English) Jan Egeland, Humanitarian Advisor to the Special Envoy for Syria, United Nations:
“They range from acutely malnourished children that are in some cases acutely malnourished because their mothers were so weak that they couldn’t breastfeed. To save the lives, you have to have a therapeutic feeding – it’s a real operation to do it, and they need to be evacuated. Then there are severely wounded civilians, children, women, men. What I hope is that, what really really I can not understand is that this people cannot be evacuated and that even children and women are now, you know, meet this bureaucratic wall of inaction.”
7. Close up, journalist
8. SOUNDBITE (English) Jan Egeland, Humanitarian Advisor to the Special Envoy for Syria, United Nations:
“Of course, we can not continue like that if we get only in a fraction of what is needed, it will be a complete catastrophe.”
9. Med shot, journalist
10. SOUNDBITE (English) Jan Egeland, Humanitarian Advisor to the Special Envoy for Syria, United Nations:
”The assessment that was done by our colleagues, they were only there for a few hours, the week before this - a week ago - showed that there are now a growing number of acutely malnourished children. If you are acutely malnourished, you are very close to dying. That is why we need also the medical evacuation.”
11. Med shot, journalists
12. SOUNDBITE (English) Jan Egeland, Humanitarian Advisor to the Special Envoy for Syria, United Nations:
”We now have, thanks to excellent cooperation with, among others our two co-chairs, the Russian Federation and the United States, a detailed plan of how to go from within Syria, from Damascus to the Berm and then a further plan to be able to deliver inside this area that is still opposition controlled. It is urgent that it happens, because the reports of suffering within the Berm is tremendous.”
13. Close up, cameraman
14. SOUNDBITE (English) Jan Egeland, Humanitarian Advisor to the Special Envoy for Syria, United Nations:
”Winter in Syria is as hard as it is in Europe. The difference between Europe and Syria is that people are now sitting after a seven year war – longer than the second world war – they have little if no reserves. They have no heat in the house, they live in the ruin, it will be a horrific winter.”
15. Close up, journalist typing
16. SOUNDBITE (English) Jan Egeland, Humanitarian Advisor to the Special Envoy for Syria, United Nations:
“ I hope our humanity is not an expiry date of the seven years - it is over. These people need our solidarity and our help and our diplomatic efforts until this war is over – hopefully we are going into the last war winter”.
17. Various shots, journalists
STORYLINE
The Syrian enclave of eastern Ghouta faces a “complete catastrophe” for the 400,000 civilians that are besieged due to the blockage of aid deliveries, UN humanitarian advisor Jan Egeland told the media today (8 Nov) in Geneva.

Egeland said “this epicenter of suffering has 400, 000 civilians - men, women and children in a dozen besieged towns and villages.”

The area east of Damascus had been “completely sealed off” since September.

After a regular meeting of the UN humanitarian taskforce on Syria, Egeland reported that medical evacuation is urgently needed, seven people had already died because they were not evacuated, 29 are at imminent risk among which are also 18 children.

Describing the bleak situation, Egeland said “they range from acutely malnourished children that are in some cases acutely malnourished because their mothers were so weak that they couldn’t breastfeed. To save the lives, you have to have a therapeutic feeding – it’s a real operation to do it, and they need to be evacuated. Then there are severely wounded civilians, children, women, men.”

He added, “What really really I cannot understand is that these people cannot be evacuated and that even children and women are now, you know, met this bureaucratic wall of inaction.”

For Egeland it is obvious that “of course, we cannot continue like that if we get only in a fraction of what is needed, it will be a complete catastrophe.”

Beside eastern Ghouta there are also other areas where humanitarian deliveries are badly needed such as Berm near Jordan’s north- eastern border where a partial distribution was possible.

He also said, ”We now have, thanks to excellent cooperation with, among others our two co-chairs, the Russian Federation and the United States, a detailed plan of how to go from within Syria, from Damascus to the Berm and then a further plan to be able to deliver inside this area that is still opposition controlled. It is urgent that it happens, because the reports of suffering within the Berm is tremendous.”

Egeland also warned of a “horrific winter” coming for the people of eastern Ghouta. He said that ”winter in Syria is as hard as it is in Europe. The difference between Europe and Syria is that people are now sitting after a seven year war – longer than the second world war – they have little if no reserves. They have no heat in the house, they live in the ruin, it will be a horrific winter.”
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