BANGLADESH / ROHINGYA MALNUTRITION

08-Nov-2017 00:02:20
A new survey shows that one in four Rohingya children in Bangladesh are suffering from malnutrition. WFP
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STORY: BANGLADESH / ROHINYGA MALNUTRITION
TRT: 02:20
SOURCE: WFP
RESTRICTIONS: PLEASE CREDIT WFP ON SCREEN
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / ROHINGYA / NATS

DATELINE: 3 - 5 NOVEMBER 2017, COX’S BAZAR, BANGLADESH
SHOTLIST
3 NOVEMBER 2017, KUTUPALONG AREA, COX’S BAZAR, BANGLADESH

1. Wide shot, camp
2. Various shots, people walking barefoot in dirty water
3. Various shots, newly arrived refugees

4 NOVEMBER 2017, COX’S BAZAR, BANGLADESH

4. SOUNDBITE (English) Michael Dunford, Emergency Coordinator, World Food Programme (WFP):
“We knew already, before they left Myanmar, that the nutritional status of the population was poor, unfortunately this further deteriorated and continues to deteriorate. We’re seeing the impacts of poor water and sanitation, high incidents of illnesses are forcing this malnutrition rate to levels that we really do not want to see, we’re going to have to invest very heavily both as WFP and as the collective of humanitarian responders to try and overcome this very concerning situation.”

5 NOVEMBER 2017, KUTUPALONG AREA, COX’S BAZAR, BANGLADESH

5. Various shots, babies being tested for malnutrition, MUAC (middle upper arm circumference)

3 NOVEMBER 2017, KUTUPALONG AREA, COX’S BAZAR, BANGLADESH

6. SOUNDBITE (Rohingya) Marium Khatun, Rohingya Displaced:
“My baby is sick, we are both sick, cough and high fever, my baby can’t breathe properly with this cough.”

5 NOVEMBER 2017, KUTUPALONG AREA, COX’S BAZAR, BANGLADESH

7. Various shots, food being prepared for distribution
8. Various shots, women receiving WFP specialized nutritious food
9. Various shots, women waiting at WFP food distribution
STORYLINE
A new survey shows that the malnutrition rates in Kutupalong are alarming. The preliminary findings indicate one in four Rohinyga children are suffering from malnutrition.

The Kutupalong nutrition assessment surveyed 405 households including families who arrived there both before and after violence escalated in northern Rakhine on August 25.

The survey shows a 7.5 percent prevalence of life-threatening severe acute malnutrition – a rate double that seen among Rohingya child refugees in May 2017.

Maungdaw district in Myanmar, where many of the refugees have come from, was among the most vulnerable and chronically food-insecure areas in Myanmar even before the current outbreak of violence, with high rates of malnutrition.

SOUNDBITE (English) Michael Dunford, Emergency Coordinator, World Food Programme (WFP):
“We knew already, before they left Myanmar, that the nutritional status of the population was poor, unfortunately this further deteriorated and continues to deteriorate. We’re seeing the impacts of poor water and sanitation, high incidents of illnesses are forcing this malnutrition rate to levels that we really do not want to see, we’re going to have to invest very heavily both as WFP and as the collective of humanitarian responders to try and overcome this very concerning situation.”

The Government of Bangladesh, international partners and local communities in Cox’s Bazar have responded robustly to the needs of hundreds of thousands of people arriving from Myanmar. WFP has reached more than 680,000 people with rice, lentils and oil.

WFP is providing nutritional support to women and young children, many of whom were already malnourished before arriving in Bangladesh. They receive Super Cereal Plus, a kind of nutritious porridge.

Food alone is not enough to solve the malnutrition problem. 2 out of 3 families interviewed tell WFP they’ve had problems with diarrhoea. Without clean water, toilets and health facilities, the malnutrition issue cannot be resolved.

SOUNDBITE (Rohingya) Marium Khatun, Rohingya Displaced:
“My baby is sick, we are both sick, cough and high fever, my baby can’t breathe properly with this cough.”

WFP urgently needs US$77 million to support one million people in the Cox’s Bazar region of Bangladesh, including the new arrivals and people who were already living in camps near the border and host communities.
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