SOMALIA / WOMENS TRAINING

24-Oct-2017 00:03:32
More than 70 women are training under the Joint Programme on Youth Employment Somalia (YES), implemented by the UN Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) and the Puntland State government. Beneficiaries are identified within disadvantaged communities and trained in the processing and marketing of dried fish, thus adding value to this product. UNSOM
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STORY: SOMALIA / WOMENS TRAINING
TRT: 03:32
SOURCE: UNSOM
RESTRICTIONS: PLEASE CREDIT UNSOM
LANGUAGE: SOMALI / ENGLISH / NATS
DATELINE: 13 OCTOBWER 2017, BOSSASO, SOMALIA
SHOTLIST
1. Wide shot, an IDP (Internally Displaced Persons) camp
2. Med shot, IDP camp
3. Wide shot, women prepare fish for packaging and consumption
4. Med shot, women prepare fish for packaging and consumption
5. Close up, women prepare fish for packaging and consumption
6. SOUNDBITE (Somali) Canab Mumin Farax, Group Member:
“I have acquired knowledge and skills that I previously lacked. I hope it will also transform my life and my family. Previously, I would bring fish from the landing site, clean, cut and cook and would sell in the market. Today, I clean our workstation and the fish, and the work is less tedious than what I used to do before.”
7. Tilt down, a woman prepares fish for packaging and consumption
8. Wide shot, a woman places fish fillets on a drying rack
9. Med shot, a woman places fish fillets on a drying rack
10. Wide shot, women pack dried fish into bags for sale
11. Med shot, women pack dried fish into bags for sale
12. Close up, fish weighed for packing
13. Med shot, women pack dried fish into bags for sale
14. Close up, fish packed in bags for sale
15. SOUNDBITE (Somali) Halima Mohamed Nur, Trainee:
“Now I can say that I have gotten a job from the training. I would also like to share with other people the skills I’ll have acquired from the training.”
16. Wide shot, women cook surplus fish for consumption
17. Close up, women cook surplus fish for consumption
18. Med shot, women cook surplus fish for consumption
19. Close up, women cook surplus fish for consumption
20. SOUNDBITE (Somali) Bint Samatar, Chairperson of the Group:
“We are happy about the job creation in the fisheries. This is what we had never discovered until now. From the training, our members have gained knowledge in processing the fish and marketing it.”
21. Wide shot, Bossaso town
22. Med shot, the women walk into a stall to sell the packaged fish
23. Close up, the women and shop owner sign receipts
24. Tilt down, boat building factory in Bossaso
25. Med shot, boat building factory in Bossaso
26. Wide shot, some of the boats being built in the factory
27. Med shot, some of the boats being built in the factory
28. SOUNDBITE (English) Michael Savins, Head of the Fisheries Infrastructure and Fleet Renewal Unit, Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO)
“The FAO Somalia Fleet Renewal Programme is about reinventing the fleets of Somalia in the artisanal fisheries sector, to provide more cost effective and more economical fishing crafts and with improved fish capture technology, with capability of these vessels to be able to land fish at realistic prices in ports such as Bossaso, that then can facilitate further activities of fish processing.”
29. Med shot, a boat builder builds a boat in the boat factory
30. Wide shot, a boat builder builds a boat in the boat factory
31. Close up, a boat builder builds a boat in the boat factory
32. Med shot, a boat builder builds a boat in the boat factory
33. Wide shot, the boat yard in Bossaso town
34. Wide shot, boat
35. Med shot, a fisherman casts his net to fish
36. Close up, a fisherman casts his net to fish
37. Med shot, a fisherman casts his net to fish
38. Wide shot, fishermen return to the landing site with fish
39. Med shot, a fisherman walks to the mainland with his catch
40. Wide shot, a fishmonger sells her fish to customers
STORYLINE
Canab Mumin Farax fled Mogadishu 16 years ago at the height of the civil war that was triggered by the collapse of the Siad Barre regime. Today she lives with her family in a temporary settlement camp in the Puntland city of Bossaso.

Canab is one of the more than 70 women training under the Joint Programme on Youth Employment Somalia (YES), which, in the case of Bossaso, has been implemented by the UN Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) and the Puntland State government to help develop the fish value production chain in Somalia. Beneficiaries are identified within disadvantaged communities and trained in the processing and marketing of dried fish, thus adding value to this product.

For Canab, this could signal an end to trekking under the scorching sun to sell cooked fish at a market next to the bus station in Bossaso, in order to sustain her family.

Canab said “I have acquired knowledge and skills that I previously lacked. I hope it will also transform my life and my family. Previously, I would bring fish from the landing site, clean, cut and cook the fish and sell in the market. Today, I clean our workstation and the fish. The work is less tedious than what I used to do before.”

Canab is a member of a community group of internally displaced persons who process sun-dried fish at the Ajuuran B camp on the outskirts of Bossaso. The group comprises six women and two men who sell the final product to nearby businesses and inland city markets.

Somalia has the longest coastline in Africa, measuring over 3,000 kilometres. For that reason, fisheries hold a great potential for the country, which can help improve livelihoods for hundreds of residents.

Although the Gulf of Aden port town of Bossaso has a vibrant fishing sector, the many challenges fishermen face there make it difficult to develop this industry into a major contributor to the economy. The FAO project addresses some of these problems in order to help establish a sustainable fishing industry.

Michael Savins, FAO Head of the Fisheries Infrastructure and Fleet Renewal Unit in Bossaso, says the lack of cold storage facilities and the challenges involved in the proper handling of fish often lead to a high level of spoilage.

Savins explains that processing sun-dried fish is a cottage-industry approach to enable fishing communities to reduce spoilage and ensure better utilization of Somalia’s abundant marine resources.

He said, “the FAO Somalia Fleet Renewal Programme is about reinventing the fleets of Somalia in the artisanal fisheries sector, to provide more cost effective and more economical fishing crafts and with improved fish capture technology, with capability of these vessels to be able to land fish at realistic prices in ports such as Bossaso, that then can facilitate further activities of fish processing.”

FAO has distributed tools that include packaging materials, tables, drying racks, knives and cutting boards to facilitate the processing of the fish.

FAO also supports associated women’s groups to market the dried fish products in inland districts such as Carmo, Qardho and Ufeyn, and even as far away as Kenya.
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