GENEVA / ARBOUR MIGRATION

13-Oct-2017 00:02:57
According to the UN's top representative on International Migration, Louise Arbour, migrants have a net positive impact on the global economy and the world's nations must urgently come together create a compact for safe, orderly and regular migration by 2018. UNTV CH
Size
Format
Acquire
N/A
Hi-Res formats
DESCRIPTION
STORY: GENEVA / ARBOUR MIGRATION
TRT: 2:57
SOURCE: UNTV CH
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 13 OCTOBER 2017 GENEVA, SWITZERLAND
SHOTLIST
1. Wide shot, exterior, Palais des Nations
2. Wide shot, press briefing room
3. Close up, camerawoman
4. SOUNDBITE (English) Louise Arbour, Special Representative of the UN Secretary-General for International Migration:
“When people think about migrants the image is immediately of a young man and - in the minds of some - coming in to either steal their jobs or abuse their welfare system. The reality has nothing to do with that. 48% of international migrants are women.
5. Pan right, reporters
6. SOUNDBITE (English) Louise Arbour, Special Representative of the UN Secretary-General for International Migration:
“Migrants overall have a lower rate of unemployment, even though they work usually for lower wages and benefits, but they are for the most part migrant workers. So they do work, they spent over 80% of their income in their country of destination and the 15 or so percent that they sent back home in the form of remittances equals in totality more than 3 times official development aid that developed countries spend using their tax payers money to assist developing countries. So the positive economic impact of migration is enormous”.
7. Med shot, reporters
8. SOUNDBITE (English) Louise Arbour, Special Representative of the UN Secretary-General for International Migration:
“If we could get a global compact that is at its core an agreement to cooperate where everybody’s self-interest is well accommodated and that has a lot of political buy-in, I think we are going to get more tangible results on the ground than I think the aspiration to something that looks like binding but yields very little in reality”.
9. Close up, journalists
10. SOUNDBITE (English) Louise Arbour, Special Representative of the UN Secretary-General for International Migration:
“The reality is law, any form of law, operates by compliance not by cohesion, by voluntary compliance. Otherwise, we would be in total chaos and this is particularly true of international law. We could sit and negotiate for 10 years to try to have a convention on migration, which in the course of the negotiations would be diluted to its lowest possible standard to accommodate everybody, and in the next day most of those trying to water it down would not ratify it in any event. This is the history of I think a lot of negotiations, of so called binding instruments”.
11. Wide shot, podium
12. SOUNDBITE (English) Louise Arbour, Special Representative of the UN Secretary-General for International Migration:
“Migration now has a home in the SDG’s, in the Sustainable Development Goals, in many aspects but very specifically under SDG 10 which speaks about reducing inequalities between and within countries. And I think this is very significant that where the United Nations, for the first time in its history is prepared to talk about migration in a cooperative spirit and very much in the context of the broad development agenda”.
13. Med shot, reporters
STORYLINE
According to the UN's top representative on International Migration, Louise Arbour, migrants have a net positive impact on the global economy and the world's nations must urgently come together create a compact for safe, orderly and regular migration by 2018.

Speaking to reporters in Geneva Friday (13 Oct) , the Special Representative also welcomed a chance for policy-makers to address myths and stereotypes of migrants, saying the public perception of migrants is much worse than it is in fact.

She said "when people think about migrants the image is immediately of a young man and - in the minds of some - coming in to either steal their jobs or abuse their welfare system. The reality has nothing to do with that. 48 per cent of international migrants are women.”

Arbour also said “ migrants overall have a lower rate of unemployment, even though they work usually for lower wages and benefits, but they are for the most part migrant workers. So they do work, they spend over 80 per cent of their income in their country of destination and the 15 or so percent that they sent back home in the form of remittances. This equals in totality more than three times the official development aid that developed countries spend using their tax payers' money to assist developing countries. So the positive economic impact of migration is enormous”.

Asked if the world would not be better served by a legally binding convention rather than a non-binding "compact" the UN's Special Representative for International Migration said that a non-binding agreement could have "more tangible results on the ground."

Louise Arbour said "if we could get a global compact that is at its core an agreement to cooperate where everybody’s self-interest is well accommodated and that has a lot of political buy-in, I think we are going to get more tangible results on the ground than I think the aspiration to something that looks like it is binding, but yields very little in reality”.

Arbour is a former judge for the Supreme Court of Canada, and has served as the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights. She said that any form of law is effective only when there is a willingness to comply.

Arbour is currently chairing the sixth informal thematic session of the Global Compact on Migration in Geneva, which concludes today. The session focused on irregular migration, as well as finding so-called "regular pathways" to migration that include decent work and labour mobility. The Special Representative was especially critical of "irregular migration" being presented as a problem of "illegal migration". She emphasized that many people enter a country in perfectly legal conditions and then find themselves in irregular situations.

Speaking about the relationship of migration to the world's agenda on sustainable development, Arbour said that “migration now has a home in the SDG’s, in the Sustainable Development Goals, in many aspects but very specifically under SDG 10 which speaks about reducing inequalities between and within countries. And I think this is very significant that where the United Nations, for the first time in its history is prepared to talk about migration in a cooperative spirit and very much in the context of the broad development agenda.”
Category
Topical Subjects
Personal Subjects
Source
Alternate Title
unifeed171013a